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The text content of our publications are not photo-facsimiled; all of our products are newly typeset for excellent readability. All of our illustrations are digitally enhanced for clarity and printing brightness. The books in both our Libraries have a highly useful red-ribbon bookmark bound in. (Once you have read a book with a bookmark, you won't want to do without one again!.) All text blocks, including those for Booklets, are printed on 70 lb. cream-coloured paper for reduced print-through and higher opacity. If the book is from the nineteenth or early twentieth century, its appearance is as close to the original as possible. All of our publications have a consistent design so that they will represent a collectible library.



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by William D. Jackson
You can really go places in this speedy hydroplane. which is designed for the largest outboard motor available. Try your hand abuilding her. She's guaranteed fun
$7.95
by Jess E. Rathbun
This kayak folds like a book
$3.95
by John Atkin
Clam is the latest of over 65 boats having this unusual hull form that have come from the boards of the Atkin family during the past 25 years.
$5.95
by C. G. Davis
This little runabout, named Pop-Gun by one who saw a model of her, is a 2o-footer of such simple construction that anyone can undertake her construction with certainty of success.
$7.95
BUILDING FIRE FLY (Pub. No. 5997)
William D. Jackson/You can really go places in this speedy hydroplane. which is designed for the largest outboard motor available. Try your hand abuilding her. She's guaranteed fun

Booklet

BUILDING FIRE FLY
by William D. Jackson

You can really go places in this speedy hydroplane. which is designed for the largest outboard motor available. Try your hand abuilding her. She's guaranteed fun
Fire Fly is a high speed, stepped, outboard hydroplane. A new but thoroughly proved method of venting the step for top speed, and a new bottom design, make this sporty craft fast, efficient and seaworthy on smooth or rough water. Fire Fly will exact every bit of speed possible from the power utilized. Outboard motors of 15 to 50 horsepower are best adapted to this super speed runabout. With this bull, the Evinrude Big Four (rated conservatively at 50 horsepower), can plane six persons with ease, haul aquaplanes, and attain speeds approaching 60 miles per hour. However, an outboard motor such as the Johnson Twin (developing around 25 horsepower), will give very satisfactory performance. Fire Fly measures 14 feet long with a beam slightly over 5 feet, The completed weight of this hull is close to 275 pounds. Cost of construction will average about seventy-five dollars. The speed of Fire Fly will range between 15 and 60 miles per hour, depending on which power unit is being used.

$7.95
FOLDING KAYAK (Pub. No. 5998)
Jess E. Rathbun/This kayak folds like a book

Booklet

FOLDING KAYAK
by Jess E. Rathbun

This kayak folds like a book
You can carry a fleet of these lightweight craft on top of your car
It's not fast, it's not roomy and you won't find many practical uses for such an outlandish craft. In fact, this center-folding kayak has only one feature to recommend it—it's fun. It's also inexpensive so you can afford to make one for every member of your family. And you can tote a whole fleet on top of your car. Construction is unorthodox. Instead of using screws, nails or other common fasteners, you "tape" the boat together with canvas and contact cement. No metal parts are required. Built according to the specifications included here, the kayak will weigh only about 40 lbs. and will accommodate an average-sized man. However, so long as the correct proportions are maintained, you can shrink the dimensions to turn out a midget version or increase them slightly to gain a little more leg room.

$3.95
BUILD HAPPY CLAM (Pub. No. 5999)
John Atkin/Clam is the latest of over 65 boats having this unusual hull form that have come from the boards of the Atkin family during the past 25 years.

Booklet

BUILD HAPPY CLAM
by John Atkin

Clam is the latest of over 65 boats having this unusual hull form that have come from the boards of the Atkin family during the past 25 years. They have varied in size from the 17-footer shown here to a 305-foot shallow-draft tanker developed during the past war. Each has been seaworthy and successful in attaining high speed with low power.
Among the inherent advantages of this hull form are its shallow draft, great stability, and low center of gravity. Full protection for the propeller is provided by the box keel. Flow of unbroken water to the propeller is made possible by tapering the keel to the propeller post. The relatively wide, flat keel maintains the boat in a level position when beached or trailer-borne. The nearly level shaft angle, which is of value in performance, is not possible to achieve in any other hull form. Edgar Davis of Whitemarsh, Pa., commissioned us to design and build the original Happy Clam. An accounting of material costs and time involved was kept and accurate speed and performance trials were made with the completed boat All of this, I am sure, will be of interest and value to prospective builders and owners of Happy Clam. The principal dimensions of this little hooker are 17 feet over all, 16 feet on her designed water line, 5 feet 6 inches wide, and 11 1/2 inches draft. Her ample freeboard of 28 1/2 inches forward and 19 5/8 inches at her stern assist in making her a dry boat. Her speed came up to full expectations. She was accurately clocked over the official measured mile of Lloyd's Neck in Long Island Sound, making 14.8 mph with a Palmer 5-hp. Baby Husky marine engine turning 2,250 rpm. The Columbian Type E two-bladed propeller is 10 in. in diameter and has a 6-in. pitch.

$5.95
"Pop-Gun"— A Twenty-Foot Runabout (Pub. No. 5905)
C. G. Davis/This little runabout, named Pop-Gun by one who saw a model of her, is a 2o-footer of such simple construction that anyone can undertake her construction with certainty of success.

Booklet

"Pop-Gun"—A Twenty-Foot Runabout
Designed by C. G. Davis

This little runabout, named Pop-Gun by one who saw a model of her, is a 2o-footer of such simple construction that anyone can undertake her construction with certainty of success—that is, anyone who knows enough of the use of tools to build a box. All that is needed is a knowledge of how to use a saw, how to plane the edge of a board straight, and how to nail lumber together. There are very few curved cuts to be made, and nearly every cut is along a straight line that may be snapped with a chalk-line or drawn with a straight edge. In fact, the designing of a boat like this is the hardest part, and that is done. Simplicity in every feature has, of course, been the leading object in designing Pop-Gun, but simplicity is quite possible in a very good little runabout, and Pop-Gun will prove a handy, serviceable, sturdy boat that will carry several people easily, and travel along at about eight miles an hour with a 3-hp. motor.

$7.95
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