Booklets

Our Booklets offer substantive narratives excerpted from larger well-known works or stand-alone articles from the periodical literature. Booklets measure 5.5"x 8.5" and contain between 4 and 48 pages and most have a number of plates in addition

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Barracuda (Pub. No. 5200)

by Luther H. Tarbox, Naval Architect

LOA 25' 6", DRAUGHT 36", BEAM 8' 101/2",WEIGHT 7130 LBS.

"Barracuda" was designed to be constructed by the amateur. Anyone possessing a passable knowledge of boats and a fair proficiency with woodworking tools should have little difficulty in building her. She can be used as a sport fisherman, a grand vacation cruiser for two, or a day cruiser for a larger party. Her lines were designed to plane at 16 mph. The bottom sections forward are sharp enough to reduce pounding to a minimum in rough water. Aft, she has a constant deadrise angle, which reduces suction at planing speeds to a minimum and induces a comfortable inboard bank on turns. Her long, straight keel gives good protection to hull, propeller, and rudder and makes her an easy craft to haul out. The shaft has been splayed slightly to port to counteract the propeller’s water-wheel effect, thus insuring that she’ll run a straight course. The fuel tanks and water tank are located so variations in tank contents have practically no effect on the boat’s trim. She was designed for a speed range of 20 to 30 mph when powered with engines of from 95 to 150 hp. The engine weight should not exceed 1,300 lbs. With the engine shown (a Graymarine Six-244 Express), driving a three-blade 16x14-in. propeller through a Graymarine VeeDrive having a 1.36: 1 reduction, she will do 20 to 23 mph. A vee-drive must be used for only the arrangement of engine and shafting shown will give the required longitudinal balance. The arrangement, both on deck and below, is practical. In the large, comfortable self-draining cockpit, the helmsman has good visibility all around. Even at planing speed, he can, see the water over the bow about one boat length forward of the stem.

16 pages, 5 plate(s)

$8.95
Serene--A Tabloid Houseboat (Pub. No. 5201)

by Luther H. Tarbox, Naval Architect

LOA 27' 31/2", BEAM 10' 01/4", DRAUGHT 2' 9", WEIGHT 8532 LBS.

For vacationing afloat or for leisurely cruising, this tabloid power houseboat should appeal to many. Most folks would rate her as a slowpoke with her 9 to 12-mph speed range, but her spacious accommodations provide comfort that the faster boats of her length cannot begin to give. Examine her cabin arrangement and see what a world of room there is below. Just forward of the cockpit is a huge galley. Then comes the deckhouse with convertible berths to sleep four. In the forward cabin are lavatory facilities and storage space galore. The engine compartment, below the deckhouse floor, contains the engine, fuel tanks, a 110-volt lighting plant, and the starting batteries. Each fuel tank has a capacity of 65 gallons. Under the after cockpit, there are a 70-gal. water tank and a 14-gal. fuel-oil tank for the galley range. "Serene" has an outboard rudder with an airfoil section, flat on the starboard side and cambered on the port side. This camber is proportioned for a right-hand propeller and cancels out its tendency to shove the stern to starboard. If the engine you install turns a lefthand wheel, the cambered side of the rudder must be to starboard. Specified power is a Lathrop LH-4 gasoline engine with 2:1 reduction gear, developing 38 hp. at 1,100 shaft rpm. This will drive "Serene" at 10 mph and consume less than four gallons of fuel per hour. Almost any medium-duty marine engine or properly converted automobile engine that develops between 40 and 75 hp. at 1,200 to 2,000 rpm could be substituted.

8 pages, 7 plate(s)

$8.95
Build the Crosby 16 (Pub. No. 5202)

by Wm. F. Crosby

This little sailboat was designed with several definite ideas in mind. The first was to have a boat that would be so extremely simple to build that almost anyone could do the job with the minimum amount of work and cost. The second idea was to produce a boat that would be virtually impossible to capsize. The third was to combine a hull and rig that would be capable of sailing faster than most boats of its size. That all three objectives have been achieved was shown pretty conclusively by Crosby 16 No. 1, which was built by a New York amateur. First, he did a thoroughly workmanlike job, encountering no difficulties. Second, the resultant boat was stable. Once she was caught in a heavy puff with a jammed mainsheet. One crew member was down to leeward, another was standing on the forward deck, and the skipper was catapulted to leeward as the little boat was knocked down. Despite the force of the wind and the tremendous upsetting leverage exerted by the crew members, she recovered without capsizing. And third, she was fast. In one free-for-all 20-mile race, dead to windward, she finished second in a fleet of over 20 boats. The boat that beat her was much longer and had a great deal more sail area. The boat that came in third was more than a mile astern at the finish. She has a flat bottom, which allows the entire boat, when reaching across the wind in fairly good breezes, to rise and plane, sometimes for as much as a half a mile at a time. Total sail area is 133 square feet, with 88 square feet in the mainsail and 45 in the overlapping jib. The rigging consists of just a jibstay and two shrouds. You need no other wires or spreaders.

12 pages, 2 plate(s)

$7.95
Simple Simon (Pub. No. 5203)

With a 3-hp. air-cooled inboard engine, this attractive 15-foot plywood utility boat will do 10 mph.

LOA 15' 71/4", BEAM 4' 51/4", DRAUGHT 13".

Designed to be seaworthy,"Simple Simon" is almost perfect for fishing and general use wherever the water kicks up a bit. While an outboard motorboat has many obviously attractive characteristics, it is far from its best in rough seas or choppy waters. You see, its stern must be broad to carry the combined weight of the motor and the operator without squatting. And its transom must be kept low--or must be cut down at the center-—so the propeller will operate in solid water. In a following sea, sooner or later a wave will come aboard, drowning the motor and perhaps even swamping the boat. An inboard boat such as "Simple Simon" can operate in a following sea without danger because its transom is higher and narrower than that of an outboard-powered boat and its engine, being located well forward of the stern, is protected. "Simple Simon" seats six in comfort. There’s room under the forward deck for quite a bit of gear. Thanks to her simplified V-bottom construction, her first cost will be low and she’ll be almost as easy to build as a flat-bottom boat. There is no difficult bending to be done. She can be powered with any small aircooled engine. With a 3/4-hp. unit, she’ll do 6 mph; with 11/2-hp., she’ll do 8 mph; and with 3 hp., she’ll do 10 mph. It isn’t advisable to put in much more than 4 hp. as she isn’t designed for speed. The air-cooled engines have three distinct advantages. First, they are simple to install. Second, they have no cooling systems to corrode or rust away. And third, they are economical to operate-—"Simple Simon" will go 64 miles on a gallon of gasoline when run at 6 mph with a 3/4-hp. engine.

12 pages, 4 plate(s)

$7.95
Sandpiper--Auxiliary Schooner for Two (Pub. No. 5204)

by William Garden, Naval Architect

LOA 24' 0", BEAM 8' 0", DRAUGHT 3' 0", SAIL AREA 36 SQ. FT.

In a day of flat-sheered, uninteresting sloops, there seems to be a rapidly increasing trend toward small cruising boats with some character. The schooner presented here should catch the fancy of a boy of any age who has a drop of adventure in his blood. Think how she will look anchored off some remote dune or tidal creek with the setting sun picking out the rake of the spars and the lazy drift of smoke from the galley stack. With her black topsides, white wale strake, white trunk, varnished weatherboards, and tanned sails, she will be every inch a little ship and will catch the eye in any company. The first of this model was built by a boy just finishing high school. The photos show her upon completion, the owner having done all of the work by himself in about one year’s spare time. She has sailed and cruised many thousands of miles and has given her owner an endless amount of pleasure. The type is about the simplest sort of boat to build and, with proper handling, can do any sort of sheltered-water cruising.

8 pages, 4 plate(s)

$7.95
Fold-Tite--A Portable Duck Boat (Pub. No. 5205)

by Weston Farmer

LOA 11' 0", BEAM 3' 6", WEIGHT 45 LBS, DRAUGHT 141/2".

"Fold-Tight" is presented in answer to numerous requests for a portable boat that could be carried right on a car. It is an excellent little job for duck hunters and can be strapped to the side or roof of an automobile. Because of its simplicity, it is less difficult to build than most boats. The parts lend themselves to easy home fabrication. The hull itself is just a heavy canvas bag, boat-shaped, that your local awning maker will sew up for you at moderate cost. If money is of prime importance, you could even do the canvas work yourself. Once you have built "Fold-Tight", you can collapse it, load it aboard your car, and take off for your favorite hunting spot. There the boat can be set up quickly for a day’s sport afloat.

8 pages, 2 plate(s)

$7.95
Jitter-Bug--A 17.5' Cabin Sloop (Pub. No. 5206)

by Hi Sibley

Here is a sloop almost made to order for the amateur builder who wants a boat with a cabin, capable of offshore ocean cruising, with more speed than the average and one that will not run into a great deal for material. It is a sturdy vee-bottom design, and the original boat built by Francis W. Straight of Pasadena, has made numerous trips to Catalina Island., 27 miles offshore from the home port.

20 pages, 4 plate(s)

$8.95
Naomi--A 22-Ft. Hooper's Island Skiff (Pub. No. 5208)

by Sam Rabl

Down where Chesapeake Bay begins to get pretty thin as far as its depth is concerned, the boys who catch the delicious soft shell crabs that you get at the high class hash joints—-when you have the money to visit them-—have developed a type of boat that will run in pretty shallow water. The fact that these crabs must be gotten in to the shipping crates in pretty quick time has also made speed imperative in their makeup. The resulting boat is so fast that the boys really go in for racing as a daily diversion and get pretty adept at it. Every once and a while they get so argumentative about the speeds of the various boats that a supervised race has to be staged to settle matters before blows are resorted to. The construction of these boats is so simple that the boys in most cases build their own and many are sold for day sailing to the furriners who visit the Island on vacations. Strange as it may seem the side planks of these boats come from the opposite side of the continent, being of fir, the only lumber at present that is available in lengths long enough to make the sides in one piece. The sailing rig is simpliàity in itself.

8 pages, 7 plate(s)

$7.95
Midge--A 7.5-Ft. Roped Dinghy (Pub. No. 5209)

by Sam Rabl

Any of the boats in this book are big enough to sport a tender of the type described here, and if they are anchored off shore this sort of boat is almost indispensable. It is of the simplest design possible, yet is very seaworthy and will carry three full grown persons if called upon to do so. The little tub will tow on any length of rope, is light enough to be taken aboard by one man—-on one occasion when almost swamped by a terrific rain "Midge" was emptied entirely of water from the stern of the parent boat. It will row with the greatest of ease and can turn on the proverbial dime, and its roped sheer will keep it from marring the high finish of any yacht’s topsides. The construction is the acme of simplicity. No frames are required, the seat acting as a brace amidship, and the two ends frame the rest of the boat. Two simple moulds are made as shown on the plans, and the bow and stern are made from any stock boards available.

8 pages, 2 plate(s)

$7.95
Pixie--A Plywood Auxiliary Cruiser (Pub. No. 5211)

by Sam Rabl

From the first line of "Pixie’s" design to the final layouts it was kept in mind that she would be built by amateurs and to this end all difficult work that usually appears on other boats was eliminated. The lines of her construction were faired full size on a mold loft floor to insure that you would get the correct full size dimensions, and a boat was built from these measurements to prove them. Stock size timbers were used throughout and they lean a little to the heavy side so that the boat will be able to take it wherever she goes. She was designed to be built with hand tools and while the power tools will save some labor they are not a necessity. Nowhere in her construction is it necessary to steam a piece of wood, and the bending of a large apron timber as is usual in these types of boats is eliminated by the use of cheek pieces on the sides of the keel. Instead of bending a piece of 2x8 as would usually be the case, it is only necessary to bend the 11/8" by 13/4” oak cheeks and then you can fasten them as you go. Moreover she was designed to take advantage of the increased strength of waterproof plywood, and is built on a system of longitudinal framing developed especially for this planking material. Where the usual boat would employ numerous transverse frames and a sawed deck beam to match at each one of them "Pixie", it will be seen, is framed around six simple frames, each one forming a complete belt around the boat and tied by its own particular deck beam.

16 pages, 5 plate(s)

$8.95
Barbara-Q--A 15-Ft. Utility Outboard (Pub. No. 5212)

by Edward F. Waldron

This V bottom boat is designed primarily as a utility type for knockabout work, fishing, camping and carrying a good load. It will handle six persons in comfort and safety. The motor may be anything from 11/2 horsepower, 19 pounds weight to 18 or 25 horsepower, and the larger motors will give the boat a good turn of speed. For general use, however, the seven-horse motor is good sinc eht eboat will then do from 12 to 14 honest miles per hour.

16 pages, 4 plate(s)

$8.95
Pirate Too--A Flattie Cruiser (Pub. No. 5213)

"Pirate Too" is a versatile little craft capable of going places without a lot of fuss. As a week-end cruiser for two people who are willing to inject a little “roughing it” into their pleasure, she has proved to be a boat which can get into places where no other boat can go; a boat that is beachable in the event of a severe storm, and that, with a log found on the beach, may be rolled away from the angry breakers. In this event, instead of riding to anchor her crew are snug and dry in their little tent cabin and can sleep it off until the storm subsides. The advent of waterproof plywood and air-cooled motors broaden the field of this type of cruiser and are utilized to advantage in this particular boat.

12 pages, 3 plate(s)

$7.95
Honker--An Outboard Motor Hunting Skiff (Pub. No. 5214)

by J.J. Fanta

Here is a highly serviceable hunting and fishing skiff whose outstanding feature is solid construction, with building simplified. Another feature is the transom projecting above the deck for attaching an outboard motor. The transom is high enough so that the motor may swing un hizh to clear weeds. etc.

11 pages, 2 plate(s)

$7.95
Slim--A 14-Ft. Outboard Motor Skiff (Pub. No. 5215)

by Robert E. Waldron

Perhaps the most useful of all boats is the skiff. A good skiff makes an excellent all-round craft for service and pleasure. Furthermore, a very fine skiff may be easily built. For enjoyment, a skiff should be reasonably fast with a small motor. Slim is a light and very snappy boat that handles well with a small outboard, and rows nicely, too.

8 pages, 4 plate(s)

$7.95
Sea Rover--A 24-Ft. Auxiliary Cruiser (Pub. No. 5216)

by J. J. Fanta

LOA 24 ft., Beam  6 ft., 11 in., Draft, 48 in., Sail Area 302 sq. ft.

The advantage of this size and type of craft is chiefly roominess and rugged seaworthiness. "Sea Rover’s" construction is all for besting heavy weather. Her 300 square foot sail area is substantial for light wind and weatherable in a blow. A 5 or 10 horsepower engine, which is optional, fits compactly under the cockpit floor behind the companionway ladder. The gas and fresh water tanks are strapped alongside the, cockpit. Forward there is stowage for rope, anchors, etc. Behind this on the port side is a clothes locker, a built-in berth and galley stove. Th starboard side has a berth between the toilet forward and the sink and refrigerator opposite the stove. Space above the berths and fixture is well utilized for lockers and shelves for dishes clothes, spare gear, etc. Turning out "Sea Rover" is entirely within the scope of the amateur builder. If you’ve built smaller craft, the experience will prove handy. Two or three to share the work and cost will find this a fascinating pay-as-you-build project.

12 pages, 5 plate(s)

$8.95
Parosa--A 16-Ft. Plywood Kynoe (Pub. No. 5217)

by Sam Rabl

Every other boat in this book was designed with the thought in mind that its crew would probably be of the masculine gender, but this one had its beginning in a strictly feminine set of requirements. Three girls wanted a boat; their reasons were widely divergent, as would be expected. One wanted a boat that could be rowed so that she could reduce some of her excess avoirdupois. The other, so that she could paddle up the creek among the lily pads where romance seemed to abound. The third, a tomboy, wanted the thrill of sailing her own ship in a spanking breeze. As if these requirements were not enough to roll together into one boat, in addition it had to be light enough to handle by themselves in and out of the water, and with enough beam to be safe under a small amount of sail. The result was a cross between a kyack and a canoe and the word kynoe was coined to describe the hybrid. Waterproof plywood was the answer to the weight problem and made the boat so light that one girl alone could pull it up on the beach and two could carry it. The beam is generous enough to work a pair of oars and still not too wide to paddle. The addition of a small dagger board solves the problem of securing enough lateral resistance to sail, and in every part the construction has been simplified.

4 pages, 3 plate(s)

$6.95
Scram III--A 15-Ft. 9" Plywood Speedboat (Pub. No. 5218)

We won't attempt to start this article off by telling you how good a design "Scram" is; the boat has spoken for herself. The advent of waterproof plywood has made the double planked bottom and the seam battened sides no longer necessary. This material can take an ungodly beating so it doesn’t need to be as thick as solid wood—thereby saving on hull weight.

8 pages, 3 plate(s)

$7.95
Installing a Small Air-Cooled Inboard Engine (Pub. No. 5219)

by J.A. Emmett

Little air-cooled engines offer a solution to the power problem of the owner of a small boat who wants the economy, simplicity, and dependability of an inboard engine without its drawbacks in the way of weight and cost. Models from 1/2 to 5 horsepower can now be had from several different manufacturers at reasonable prices; they may drive direct, have a one-way clutch to permit starting the engine at the dock, or be fully equipped with clutch and reverse gear to give maneuvering ability under power. Weights range from under 100 lbs., for the small size up to 200 lbs., for a fully equipped five horse motor. Then there are the new high-speed lightweight models developed along the line of an outboard motor power head but with transmission arranged to run through the bottom of the boat which weigh as little as 42 lbs. for a 21/2 h. p. size.

8 pages

$6.95
Plover--A 15-Ft. Auxiliary Knockabout (Pub. No. 5220)

Here are plans and details for building "Plover", a snappy knockabout sailer that meets the demand for a sturdy, well-built craft for comfortable going. Fifteen feet long, "Plover" is a lot of boat for her size, and yet ideal for single-handed sailing. The five-foot beam makes for a commodious cockpit and the safe pleasure of five or six persons. The sloop rig of 121 square feet handles easily and is very efficient. The entire rig is balanced so that stability is at a maximum. Weighing between 450 and 500 pounds, depending on materials, this sailer is conveniently rowed if necessary, and is light enough to be transported by trailer. A model “B” Briggs and Stratton air-cooled motor is installed to ork the boat in a calm, and in and out of tight harbors or creeks. The little motor is self-contained, needs no batteries to operate and being air-cooled does away with water cooling troubles, a boon where heavy grass or muddy water conditions are encountered.

12 pages, 5 plate(s)

$8.95
Popeye--A 36 Inch Model Racing Sloop (Pub. No. 5221)

by Larry Elsinger

"Popeye" is a model racing sloop of moderate size, requiring no special skill to build except undivided attention in carrying out instructions and following the plans. The “bread and butter” or laminated type of construction was chosen for "Popeye" because of the comparative speed and ease with which a well proportioned boat may be constructed by this method.

8 pages, 4 plate(s)

$7.95
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