Booklets

Our Booklets offer substantive narratives excerpted from larger well-known works or stand-alone articles from the periodical literature. Booklets measure 5.5"x 8.5" and contain between 4 and 48 pages and most have a number of plates in addition

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Meow--A Plywood Catskiff (Pub. No. 5224)

by Ernest A. Johnson, N. A.

"Meow" is a plywood cat-rigged skiff that can be rowed, sailed, or powered with an outboard motor of 11/2 h.p. It was designed especially for the amateur builder, and has proved to be a fast and dry sailer. Its cost is reasonable as the bottom, sides and deck can all be cut from 2 standard plywood panels of 12x4-ft. x 1/4-in. There are no butts and the only seams are at the keel and chine.

8 pages, 2 plate(s)

$7.95
Hot Foot--A Speedy Outboard V-Bottom Pram (Pub. No. 5225)

by Luther H. Tarbox, Naval Architect

For the chap who desires to build a high-performance, V-bottom outboard having nearly the simplicity of construction of a flat-bottom boat, "Hot Foot" will prove to be just what the doctor ordered. She will plan with moderate power, yet she is rugged enough to take a 25-hp motor. Powered with a hot motor, she could give some of the service outboard racing runabouts a run for their money. While she won't pound too much and will be reasonably dry in choppy water, she was not designed for open-water use. The construction of Hot Foot is fairly rugged. No attempt has been made to secure light weight at the expense of adequate hull strength, so she can be depended upon to give years of satisfaction. This cannot be said of many designs of her type and intended service. She can be planked with either waterproof plywood or conventional wood.

12 pages, 4 plate(s)

$7.95
Building Riptide--A 13-Ft. Outboard Fishing Skiff (Pub. No. 5226)

A 131/2 x 5-foot fishing skiff for outboards.

by Robert J. Whittier

There are many spots along the seacoast where rivers, creeks, and small bays afford good moorings for fishing skiffs. Just outside, the ocean teems with fish. The narrow inlets to the protected waters, however, often develop nasty chops due to the struggle between tide, ground swell, and wind. Even on fair days, it may be a problem to get through such turbulent areas. "Riptide" was designed to cope with such conditions. She’s a practical, roomy boat with a bow that’s 24 in. high. The outboard motor is mounted in a well at the stern. This allows the installation of an outer transom that’s far higher than is ordinarily possible so there’s no danger of swamping in a following sea. Unlike a good many dories and semi-dories one is apt to find on salt water, she is a very steady boat to fish from.

12 pages, 3 plate(s)

$7.95
Merry Maid--A 15-Ft. Plywood Runabout (Pub. No. 5227)

Plywood 15-ft. runabout.

by Charles M. Ungerbuehier, Yacht Designer

"Merry Maid" was designed for the man who desires a roomy little runabout capable of good speed and having rough-water ability. With her graceful, sweeping sheer, she is a saucy little packet. She has completely pleased her original owner and may interest those of you who desire an inexpensive, easily built boat. Powered with a Mercury Super Ten and carrying two passengers, the prototype ran from Seaford, Del., to Nanticoke, Md., and return, a distance of approximately 80 miles, in 4 hours and 15 minutes without ever having had the motor wide open. Under way, "Merry Maid" runs cleanly at either high or low speed, banks beautifully, and has sufficient stability, despite her light weight, to allow a couple of passengers to sit on the side decking without fear of being tossed overboard. The boat is large enough so that passengers sit down in it rather than on it.

8 pages, 2 plate(s)

$7.95
Imp--A 14-Ft. Utility Inboard (Pub. No. 5228)

by Gerald Taylor White

"Imp" has all the earmarks of a good boat. If she were twice her length, the same hull form would still produce a good boat for all-around use. There’s enough deadrise to avoid pounding in any ordinary sea and enough draft to hang on instead of sliding crabwise every time she gets smacked by a beam or quartering sea. To keep her crew dry, "Imp" has more than the usual amount of freeboard. Her nicely flaring sides forward round into a pleasing tumblehome aft, quite like her larger sisters who swing proudly at anchor off the swanky yacht clubs. Of course, "Imp" is not a cruiser—or is she? The canvas weather cloth forward certainly covers ample space to stow all sorts of camping gear and if the after seat is made removable, there’ll be room enough to spread a couple of inflatable mattresses. A second canvas, buttoned to the forward spray shield and over the sheer molding, will provide as snug a bit of cabin as lots of people would want. Powered by a 5-hp aircooled motor, "Imp" will run just about all day on a buck’s worth of gasoline and oil. The small propeller will keep the draft shallow enough so that you can sneak up picturesque waterways where the bigger boats wouldn’t dare to venture. If you do get snared on a sandbank, simply jump overboard and shove ‘er off.

12 pages, 3 plate(s)

$7.95
Fontana (Pub. No. 5230)

by S. S. Rabl, Naval Architect

We who live on the sea coasts have been in the habit of thinking that all worthwhile boating is done in arms of the sea. In the past few years, however, thanks to the several Federally sponsored hydroelectrification projects, many inland manmade lakes, connected with thousands of miles of cruising water, have appeared. In the Tennessee Valley, where one of the projects is located, a new generation of boatmen has come into being. I have passed through this region several times and have seen enough of its advantages to want to spend the rest of my life in its quietude. It is possible to take a small boat in there by trailer and it was to this end that "Fontana" was designed and named in honor of one of the beautiful lakes of the region. Many hotels and motor courts are set close to the water, so it is not necessary to spend one’s vacation cramped in a small cuddy cabin. "Fontana" is therefore an open boat with a sedan top. If caught far from tourists’ quarters, she can be converted to an overnighter by rigging her canvas curtains. For berths, lay two inflated beach mattresses on the flooring. For cooking, use a Coleman stove.

12 pages, 6 plate(s)

$8.95
Whoosh--A Fast Runabout (Pub. No. 5231)

by Charles M. Ungerbuehler, Yacht Designer

If you’ve ever harbored the desire (and who hasn’t?) to own a trim, racy runabout, one that is fairly easy to build and will give years of reliable service and pleasure, then you’ll want to get started on "Whoosh". Performance-wise, this snappy little speedster is everything that her name implies, and is ideally suited for general river and lake use. While "Whoosh" is not primarly intended for rough, deep-water operation, her sea-going qualities have not been sacrificed in the interest of greater speed. The design incorporates a modern constant-section afterbody, which has proved its superiority on countless other craft, and a generous degree of deadrise to keep riding comfort at a maximum consistent with this type. With these design considerations, "Whoosh" will never have to take a back seat to any stock-built runabout of comparable size when the going gets choppy. The arrangement is planned for the utmost in comfort, convenience, and stability. Reached through a hatch, the shelf under the forward deck provides stowage space for anchor, line, and other light gear. A little farther astern is the driver’s seat, which holds two comfortably and has locker space below.

16 pages, 3 plate(s)

$8.95
Caballero (Pub. No. 5232)

by Charles M. Ungerbuehler, Naval Architect

"Caballero" was designed for the amateur builder who desires a roomy, fast, and comfortable cruiser without the attendant high building and upkeep costs usually associated with inboard craft. She is a direct developmertt of an earlier design that has proved successful in the hands of a large number of builders. The cabin provides comfortable quarters for two. Besides the berths, it contains a galley stove, food locker, icebox, watercloset, and adequate storage space. There is not, of course, standing headroom. There is, however, ample sitting headroom. That is all you can expect in a boat of this size; so don’t be persuaded by some misguided amateur adviser to increase the headroom in hope of making a better boat of her. You have the word of the designer that you will not. "Caballero’s" rough-water ability will be excellent. The hull shows a pronounced flare forward and the maximum allowable deadrise consistent with her speed requirements. Her afterbody is of the constantsection type, which will insure comfortable banking on the turns and a smooth, disturbance-free, level ride.

12 pages, 3 plate(s)

$7.95
Carin--A Fast Auxliary Sloop (Pub. No. 5233)

by A. Mason, Naval Architect.

If a survey were ever conducted on the subject, it would probably reveal that the majority of small auxiliary cruising sailboats are used primarily for day-sailing. Despite the fact that these craft take relatively few cruises, a surprisingly large percentage of the boating public seems to feel that even a small boat has to incorporate all the gimcracks and conveniences that we have come to regard as necessities ashore. And for equally unfathomable reasons, some will cheerfully sacrifice stability to be able to stand erect under the cabin beams. Unfortunately, elaborate accommodations and full headroom just can’t be properly designed into a small boat and still result in an able, seaworthy craft. "Carin" is as close to an ideal compromise of these factors as you could hope to find. She’s a smart little sailer that will prove a source of satisfaction to even the most discriminating skipper. The plans were developed from an earlier design which has been built in many parts of the world and whose owners have enthusiastically reported speed, seaworthiness, and general ability to outperform many larger and well-known designs. "Carin" is only slightly larger than her prototype and can be expected to yield an even better turn of speed.

12 pages, 6 plate(s)

$8.95
Southwind--A 22-Ft. Dory Sharpie (Pub. No. 5235)

by H. I. Chapelle

Here’s a small, shallow-draft sailing craft which combines sea-worthiness with economy and, with power, will make moderate speeds.

There is sometimes a need for a seaworthy, small sailing boat of very shallow draft. The “Southwind” was designed to fill this need at relatively low cost and with little labor. The old round-sided sailing dories of New England, and the Seabright Skiffs of New Jersey prove that the flat-bottom may be combined with rounded topsides to make a seaworthy small boat. However, these are usually rather narrow on the bottom and thus can carry only a small area of sail, so to make “Southwind” faster in summer weather her bottom was made wider and approaches the sharpie in proportion. She can be built with or without a cuddy, as indicated in the plans.

24 pages, 3 plate(s)

$9.95
Sea Glider (Pub. No. 5236)

by Joseph Adams

"Sea Glider" is basically a scow or, if you prefer, a pram. She’s truly an allpurpose boat. For those who like speed, she’ll skim along the top of the water beautifully with a stock 10-hp motor; for those who~want to troll for fish, she’ll idle down and ride nicely on an even keel. Her V-bottom meets a bow that is narrower than the rest of the boat, giving a nice spoon shape. This not only eliminates the jarring slap common to a scow when bucking heavy seas but makes her buoyant and much drier than any sharp-bowed boat of comparative size

8 pages, 1 plate(s)

$7.95
Kitty-Cat--An Easy-to-Build Catamaran (Pub. No. 5237)

by John Long

Whether you’re looking for something really different or just want a light, fast-sailing boat that’s easy to build and can take a lot of punishment, you’ll want to own "Kitty-Cat". This handsome little catamaran is guaranteed to inspire comments of envy and admiration wherever she makes an appearance, and she leaves mighty little to be desired in the way of snappy performance. The sailing catamaran had its origin in the South Seas. Hundreds of years ago, the islanders astounded the first white visitors with the speed and agility of their unusual craft. Early New England whalers are generally credited with bringing first reports on the fast little twin—hulled native boats to this country. During the past century, many “cats” have been built in all parts of the world. The type has continued to fluorish in Polynesia; today, Hawaii is the acknowledged center of catamaran activity, and the cats are currently enjoying steadily increasing popularity in the United States.

8 pages, 6 plate(s)

$7.95
Water-Wagon--A 20-Ft. Outboard Houseboat (Pub. No. 5238)

"Water Wagon" is the first member of a new family of boats designed to appeal to outdoorsmen everywhere. She combines the best features of a fishing cruiser, house trailer, hunting lodge, family picnic boat, and exploration vessel. As a boat, she is surprisingly seaworthy. Her 51/2-in. draft will enable you to explore behind islands and in coves no other boat can reach. You can go right across sand bars, thus sometimes cutting in half the running time on a trip. Adequate speed is provided by one or two outboard motors. With the remote motor controls now available, one person can handle "Water Wagon"; but she’s fun to run even if you don’t have remote controls—simply use a seagoing bell system and have one person in the bow to act as pilot and another in the stern as engineer. Elimination of bilges allows 6 ft. 6 in. headroom. Two people can sleep in the cabin. Hinged upper berths could be added to accommodate two more. On the house top, two more can bunk down on the utility box and still two more can sleep on folding cots. A well-appointed toilet room and an enclosed shower add luxury to utility. For lovers of the rod and reel who can’t take the sun, the wheel wells can be used as inside fishing wells. Included in the accommodations are a comfortable dinette and a galley that has running water, a gas stove, and a 50-lb. icebox.

6 pages, 3 plate(s)

$7.95
Mallard--A 14-Ft Duck Boat (Pub. No. 5239)

Light enough for car-top carry, this 14-foot plywood duck boat will keep you dry on hunting trips and also make a good blind.

With a boat like "Mallard" that is especially designed for duck hunting, you’ll get more enjoyment from your gunning and maybe bag an extra bird or two. The boat described in this article is extremely light in weight, just under 100 lbs., so that it rides on top of your car instead of in a trailer behind it. For all this lightness, the boat is strong and rugged, thanks to the sturdy framing and the plywood construction. By using ordinary care in building and under normal service conditions, there shouldn’t be any leaks during the lifetime of the boat. And there’s no need to worry about spray coming aboard, the 11 inch freeboard will keep you bone dry and it is also low enough to permit using the boat as a blind when it’s pulled ashore. An added attraction of this design is that by using the alternate square stern construction shown on the plans, you can attach an outboard motor and use "Mallard" for your fishing or general sports use as well as for hunting.

12 pages, 3 plate(s)

$7.95
Gunning Skiff Ranger, The (Pub. No. 5240)

by H. I. Chapelle

The gunning skiffs are often highly specialized craft, suitable only for hunting purposes. There are some, however, that are more versatile; the famed Barnegat Sneakbox, for example. This style of skiff is not only a very fine hunting boat but also a popular model for pleasure sailing. The Sneakbox, in its best model at least, is not an extremely easy boat to build. Fortunately there are gunning skiffs having much the same qualities as the Sneakbox and that are more easily built. One of these, the subject of this discussion, is the Long Island gunning sharpie. The Long Island gunning sharpie developed away back, so far back in fact that we do not know when it came into use. But the model reached its height of development soon after the Civil War and has remained almost unchanged since then. The sharpie gunning skiff is still used, for it is a very handy boat for setting out decoys and for picking up birds. There are some gunners who use sail nowadays to reach their blinds, for they think the noise of an outboard is objectionable in this. Because of its decked hull, strongly flaring sides and rather light weight, the sharpie gunning skiff is often preferable for pleasure sailing, out of the gunning season, as compared to sailing dinghies and prams of roughly the same dimensions. Because of its design, which gives the skiff many of the same qualities as the old-time wooden, decked “cruising canoe,” the gunning sharpie has been used by some hardy souls for rather long single-handed cruises; just as in the case of the better-known Sneakbox. Rugged and easy-working, this utility craft rows and sails well and needs only a low-powered outboard.

16 pages, 5 plate(s)

$8.95
Mule--A 14-Ft. Sailing Garvey (Pub. No. 5241)

by H. I. Chapelle

We had been sitting around my drafting table talking about small boat designs and Dick, a professional boatbuilder, had been complaining about the lack of plans for a cheap, easily-built boat that would do for both work and pleasure. “These utility boats, now,” he said, “the trouble with the designs I’ve seen is that they are either too expensive to build to be used for the rough work a real utility boat ought to do, or they are too specialized. We call lots of boats utility craft without thinking just what they really are. As I see it, a utility boat ought to be useful for going fishing along the shore or to be used for an afternoon sail. If it is too much trouble to ship a sailing rig or an outboard, then the boat ought to row well enough to be pleasant to use. She ought to be capable of carrying four or five people with at least a reasonable amount of gear, too. The boat should be stable enough to allow you to load and unload without having to do a tight-wire walking act. She ought to be a combination work-boat and pleasue-boat if that is possible, and, man she has GOT to be both cheap and easy to build, as well as being useful in the greatest variety of ways."

24 pages, 4 plate(s)

$9.95
Pollywog (Pub. No. 5242)

by William Garden, Naval Architect

"Pollywog" was designed for young people who love cruising. Lively under sail and roomy on deck and below, she’s a good type to acquire when thoughts of a voyage of exploration begin pushing aside studies and other trifles. While she is but 18 feet long (the size of the usual day-sailer), she has adequate depth and enough outside ballast to enable her to make coastwise passages in safety—and for exploring, the draft of less than three feet is ideal. For auxiliary power, we suggest installing a one-cylinder, four or five-hp marine engine. The layout in the snug cuddy cabin has been kept simple to allow maximum use of the available room. A piece of netting runs along each side for stowing clothes and gear. A couple of air mattresses on the flooring are ideal for sleeping or lounging. Two shelves at the forward end of the cabin take cooking utensils and food. The cockpit is long enough so that it can be converted into an extra sleeping location by rigging a tent oyer the boom.

8 pages, 3 plate(s)

$7.95
Vixen--A 21-Ft. Runabout (Pub. No. 5243)

by George E. Meese

Here’s a craft with an underwater form specially designed to move at almost PT boat speeds, whether the water is smooth or choppy.

Were you ever out boating with some friends when a runabout slipped past causing everyone aboard your boat to remark about its speed? After a few words along that line, one of the supposedly water-wise characters comes up with the sour-grapes remark, “Yeh, but he can only do that on smooth water!” That remark might have been true in the past. However, naval architectural research has developed an underwater form that will give a high smooth-water speed and still allow the boat to be pushed at nearly those same speeds in rough water. "Vixen" was developed from these lines in order to give maximum performance in both smooth and rought water, and still be easy enough to build by the amateur.

16 pages, 5 plate(s)

$8.95
Matey--An 8-Ft. Plywood Dinghy (Pub. No. 5244)

Light in weight but built for hard service; ideal as a tender or an all-purpose boat.

Anchoring a large boat off shore makes a good dinghy a “must” item as far as the average owner is concerned. While it’s true you can pull back and forth in almost any old tub, it’s a lot less work in a boat that’s designed for this work and she’ll also add to the appearance of the larger craft. "Matey" not only fills the bill on both these counts but she’ll also tote a surprising load of passengers and gear. When everyone’s on board, you won’t need any tackle to hoist her up on deck-—she’s light enough so that one man can do the trick. Under way, the little 'dink' tows easily on almost any length of line. Best of all, you don’t have to spend a day or two getting her in shape at fitting-out time. Because of the plywood planking, her hull is practically leakproof and with ordinary care should stay that way for many seasons. In fact, she’s the answer to a boat owner’s prayer. However, if you’re not in that league as yet, "Matey" still has a lot to offer. For one thing, the construction’s a cinch andyou can carry her to the nearest lake dr river on the roof of your car. Once there, it takes only a minute to put her in the water and enjoy a day of fishing or just plain fun afloat. And if you happen to have an outboard, you can hang it on her transom and go places at a good speed.

8 pages, 2 plate(s)

$7.95
Ellenda--A 22.5 Ft Sedan Cruiser (Pub. No. 5245)

by N.S. Glassman

Here’s an economical little cruiser designed for family picnics and fishing parties; it provides comfortable sleeping quarters for two.

Ellenda” is a sedan cruiser of 22 ft. 7 in. over-all length, 20½ ft. on the water line, 7 ft. 9 in. beam on deck, and an all-up weight of 2500 pounds. She was designed for family picnics and fishing parties. The sedan cruiser layout was chosen in preference to a flying-bridge model in order to protect the helmsman from the hot sun and rain squalls of summer and the cold winds of an autumn evening. Comfortable sleeping accommodations have been provided for two six-footers. There is a neat little galley and a marine type toilet. The headroom in the cabin is approximately 5½ ft. “Ellenda” is not a speedboat. The hull form was carefully designed to provide reasonable and economical performance with low power. An engine with not more than 25 horsepower is recommended. With this power, top speed is close to 10 mph. As built, she is powered with a Universal Utility Four Marine Engine, 25 HP at 2500 rpm, turning a three blade propeller of 13-in. diameter and 8-in, pitch. The actual speed on timed trials were 8¼ mph at 1800 rpm and 7¼ mph at 1600 rpm in fresh water. She will do a little better in salt water. Fuel consumption at 1800 rpm is 1½ gallons of gasoline per hour. Thus, the “Ellenda” is an economical little motor cruiser.

18 pages, 4 plate(s)

$8.95
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