Booklets

Our Booklets offer substantive narratives excerpted from larger well-known works or stand-alone articles from the periodical literature. Booklets measure 5.5"x 8.5" and contain between 4 and 48 pages and most have a number of plates in addition

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Lark Jr. (Pub. No. 5115)

by Robert Bosley

Lark, Jr., is a boy’s boat—a 131/2-foot long cabin cruiser for inland and coastal waters.

Younger boating enthusiasts who yearn to build a boat all their own will find Lark, Jr., ideal for their limited abilities and slim purses. The construction has been made as simple as is consistent with a well-designed boat and planking curves are so simple that no steaming is necessary. The cabin, though small, has room for radio set, cooking utensils, and other equipment needed for a short cruise. Lark, Jr., is seaworthy enough to weather anything a boat of her inches has any business being out in. She’ll make a fine project for any youth, but will be a bit cramped for the grown up six-footer.

10 pages, 3 plate(s)

7.12€
Cockeybird (Pub. No. 5116)

by Weston Farmer

Cockybird’s hull is simple to build, orthodox in construction below the sheer. Right up to that point she’s the same as any of the present day popular runabouts. Her deck is unusually husky for a boat like this, being of 3/4 inch stuff. If any people in the world take things more for granted than kids do I haven’t run across them. There’ll be leaps from six foot docks, there’ll be oil barrels (yes, on occasion) and maybe even rocks, for the crib of the dock, hauled around on her deck. And I don’t want that deck to measure short of expectations. There has been no attempt to make a very light boat in Cockybird. She is small enough so that an added eighth of an inch here, a quarter of an inch there on her scantlings will have no measurable effect in increasing her weight or decreasing her speed. The factor, adequacy, should in every case be considered first in a boat. So her deck is heavy and her clamp, which holds the deck to the hull and drinks up the deck loads, is heavy too. The hull itself leans toward fairish lightness, with enough frames provided for what I feel is a good distribution of stresses.

20 pages, 2 plate(s)

8.01€
How to Build Mayfay (Pub. No. 5117)

by Weston Farmer

Mayfay is designed to do one thing and to do it well; to carry a large outboard, utilize its power efficiently, and to carry at least two people with abbreviated equipment on a cruise of short duration. She is 17 feet plus a few inches over all, by 5ft 6in beam, and has a depth varying from about 41/2 feet amidships to 21 inches at the stern. She will bunk two comfortably, and is best built in the simple raised deck style.

9 pages, 2 plate(s)

7.12€
Katusha--A Classic Inboard Cruiser/Runabout (Pub. No. 5118)

by Weston Farmer

Here’s another design by Weston Farmer who has turned out a most interesting little tabloid cabin cruiser complete with full size bunk, stove, sink and icebox. One of the most successful of these small boats is shown elsewhere in this book. You may also have heard of her before. Her name is "Mayfay". She is an improvement on an older boat which was designed some four or five years ago as a “pot boiler” and which, surprisingly, turned out to be one of the best boats I have ever designed. "Mayfay" ran so beautifully and performed so well that she is remarked by all hands along the waterfront where boatwise men congregate. "For a long time I have wanted to take that perfect planing little hull, enlarge it just as a tailor lets out a vest ever so little so that it is “jest right” for a little more bulk, and put midget apartment accommodations aboard her. And by golly I finally got around to it. The finished job methinks is a sweetheart. So here she is—and her name is Russian "Katusha", which means “Sweetheart” in the Czar’s tonguesky. Consider "Katusha": Her length is 19 feet, with an inch or two over. Her breadth is 6’7”. She will build in any average sized garage. Out of experience with previous tabloids I have come to the conclusion that there is no need denying the crew a real, full-sized bunk. So you’ll find "Katusha" equipped with one".

12 pages, 2 plate(s)

7.12€
Sez You! (Pub. No. 5119)

by Weston Farmer

The history of this design is an interesting one. Really, the hull of Sez You is an adaptation of a design for which Bruno Beckhard, the outboard motor maestro of Brooklyn, was responsible. Back in the days, not so very long ago either, when the outboard motor was a new and wonderful thing barely capable of making a hydroplane plane, Bruno started experimenting with flat bottom water wagons, v-bottom hydros, and heaven knows what not. Out of it all he evolved a boat which Jerry White, then editor of Rudder and now editor of Motor Boat, published as a how to build article. This original boat which was the combined efforts of White and Beckhard was called Nize Baby. She went like the deuce, and was the same dimensions over all as is Sez You here. But—and there’s the rub—the Sea Sled Company, zealous prosecutors of the patent rights of their company, claimed that the design was an infringement of the Sea Sled patents, and considerable annoyance was caused for all concerned. I reasoned to Clotilde, my pocket data book, that half of the Nize Baby designs remained at present unbuilt due to the misunderstanding caused by this controversy. Knowing that the secret of Nize Baby’s performance was not in the concaved sections but was rather in the longitudinal reverse curve to the bottom which was transversely as flat as a pancake aft of amidships anyway, I figured that a design could be calculated from the old Nize Baby idea which would fulfill the function of Nize Baby, and yet be just straight boat, with a flat bottom and no outside frills to tread on other people’s toes. Then every one could build one, and have sport for fair. So Sez You is the result. And to prove her, we built her and tested her out on the waters of Lake Minnetonka not so long ago. And does she go! Say, mister—like a hot penny on a greasy pan says me!

8 pages, 1 plate(s)

7.12€
Doane's 40-Mile Hydrobout (Pub. No. 5120)

Here are the lines, offsets and specifications for the famous Doane Hydrobout--a one-step uitility hydroplane runabout which has been highly developed by Art Doane.

The advent of the outboard hydroplane had both its good and bad consequences. On the good side it taught us that the placing of a step in a boat could and almost always would increase the speed if the boat was of the planing type. We learned where this step should be placed, and a lot of correlative features concerning steps. On the bad side were noted many spills and a gemeral “greased pig” behavior of hulls. Most of these handling difficulties have been attributed to their proper place: That is to the motor and the placement of weights in an outboard hull, but in some quarters the notion got around that the step caused the chine to dig and that step hulls weren’t as easy to handle or as stable as straight bottom planing boats. That notion is a lot of poppycock, fit to be classed with the mistaken notion that Hoover was the cause of the depression. With a properly designed step bottom the handling is no different from an ordinary runabout, and the speed is, of course, generally about ten miles an hour faster for a given power. The reason for this increase in speed is because the water breaks away from the hull, and air is admitted at a point where atmospheric pressure is beginning to turn into a vacuum tending to further load the boat, depress the stern, and slow her up. The step boat, properly designed, just as an airplane or a motor boat should be (with respect to planing areas, weights, etc.), is drier, softer riding, worlds faster, and as sweet handling as the old-fashioned straight bottom stuff.

12 pages, 2 plate(s)

7.12€
Whizzer--A Hydroglider (Pub. No. 5122)

by Weston Farmer

At last! Here’s the long looked for air-drive speeder which our shoal draft boat bugs have been looking for. Souped-up motorcycle conversions will furnish good speeds if weight is watched.

There are two things which remained unanswered in the general lexicon of published wisdom on things boatwise. One unanswered question is, will a converted motorcycle or auto engine drive a boat with an air prop?” The second unanswered question is “How can I get reasonable speed on a boat that will float on a morning dew?” Whizzer is the answer to all of this. She’s little, and light, and easy to build in the bargain. And inexpensive. Further, she will go reasonably fast with a light converted motorcycle engine which has enough intestines to produce 25 h. p. on a weight of around 85 lbs. About 22-23 m.p.h. And she draws as little water as is reasonable. I’d like to leave that rudder off, so that there would be nothing on the bottom but paint, but I can’t perpetrate anything on the public that won’t work, so I’m telling you that air rudders are lousy-—a bane on the stern end, if you get what I mean. Not only are they affected by every cross wind that blows, but they haven’t any turning power at low speeds. On airplanes they are 0. K. as there is enough wind to make them effective. On a boat to do the same work they have to be as big as a barn. So water rudder we have, with its effectiveness and draft.

4 pages, 2 plate(s)

6.22€
Tubby--A 12-ft. Sailing Scow (Pub. No. 5123)

by Sam Rabl

Here’s the water baby for you amateur boating fans who want to build and sail your own craft but find that the average job is beyond your means or your ability to construct. "Tubby” is a sailing scow that can be handled safely in any water fit for small boat sailing, white the construction is simplicity itself.

LOA 12', BEAM 4'.

With the recent successes we add to our series of easy to build craft another little packet in the same trend. We have received numerous letters and photos of the completed products from men and boys who had never before attempted the construction of a boat and without exception all of them are very creditable jobs. Numerous letters were received from timid souls who were afraid to tackle the construction of a craft of "Sunray’s" complexion; and as an answer to those letters we are presenting "Tubby", the ultra-simple little boat here shown. A cursory examination of the plans will show the simple scow construction with very few pieces requiring a bend (there are only two), and no complicated centerboard to bother with. The scow type may at a glance seem a boat unsuited for sailing but we only have to point out the Dutch craft famous for their sailing and their ability to set down on the hard at low tide. Tabby isn’t Dutch by any means, but follows a type of craft fast disappearing from the Chesapeake Bay which before the advent of the motor truck carried most of the building stone between Port Deposit and points on the bay. Most of them were large sloop rigged craft.

8 pages, 4 plate(s)

7.12€
Build this Olympic Monotype Sailboat (Pub. No. 5124)

Designed by Edson B. Schock

We are mighty proud to present here plans for one of the sweetest lined little craft we have seen in many a moon. The Monotype class was the official one-design boat in the recent Olympic games, and comes from the board of the most famous of West Coast designers, Mr Edson B. Schock. Here’s a boat to be proud of. The Olympic Monotype, which might be called a centerboard catboat with “V” bottom, is unsurpassed for light to medium weather sailing. The low cost of construction and the fact that it requires a minimum use of the steambox and no elaborate tools, make it an ideal craft for home building; while the comparative safety with which it can be handled makes it ideally suited to the requirements of the younger generation of yachtsmen. Furthermore, the fact that this design has been officially adopted indicates the prestige which it enjoys among those who build and sail good boats. It is modestly hoped that this article will inspire the construction of this type of craft in and around yachting centers to the extent that Monotype clubs might be organized, thus promoting the sport from the competitive angle and making the boats of proportionately greater value.

17 pages, 2 plate(s)

8.01€
Sea Skeeter--An Ideal Boat for Young Mariners (Pub. No. 5125)

This unique craft is designed for the young skipper who has had no previous experience in marine construction, and who wants an inexpensive, light boat in which to learn the A-B-C’s of navigation. By using a single sheet of galvanized iron for the entire bottom the job of caulking is practically eliminated, for the joint between bottom and side-members is made water-tight when assembled by means of a strip of cloth soaked in white lead. Also, the builder need not worry over a centerboard-well because the centerboard is hinged to the bottom and no opening is required. The mast together with sail and boom can be lifted out of the step instantly and stowed, the only rigging being a single main sheet. Steering is with a paddle which comes in handy during a calm.

4 pages, 1 plate(s)

6.22€
Tar Baby--A Midget Dinghy (Pub. No. 5126)

by Walter E. Stewart

Here’s a V-bottom dinghy which you can build in two weeks’ spare time. Seven feet long, she can seat four people and can be used as a sailboat, rowboat, or with an outboard motor. She’s simple to build and no special tools are required.

You can build this fine little V-bottom dinghy in two weeks’ spare time, at home, with a few ordinary tools, and at a cost about one-fourth that which would be charged by a professional builder. "Tar Baby" is first of all seaworthy and safe, she will keep you dry in choppy waters, she rows easily, sails like a witch, and will step along with an outboard motor. She is a lap-strake, V-bottom design seven feet long, and 42 inches beam. She will seat and carry three people comfortably, and four can be crowded in with safety. All frames are straight pieces, require no bending, and the planking can all be bent by hand without steaming. An amateur with average knowledge of tools can build her from the accompanying plans, and when finished she will have all the earmarks of a professional job. "Tar Baby" is normally a yacht or motorboat tender, and in this service will do as well, and look as good as a great many stock boats costing four or five times as much. But she is more than a tender, the addition of a centerboard and sail converts her into a fast and able sailing dinghy which will more than hold her own in the increasingly popular dinghy races.

9 pages, 4 plate(s)

7.12€
Bouncer--A Fish Class Sailboat (Pub. No. 5127)

by Warren H. Miller

This is an improved version of the famous Annisquam "Fish” Class Marconi rigged catboat. Mr. Miller built his boat as pictured here, making even his own sail. All of this fine adventure in boatbuilding is here told with that fine frankness which characterizes the old salt from ‘way Down East in Massachusetts. The popular Fish class racing cat was built by a sole yard, Montgomery of Riverdale, Mass. About three hundred of them have been put out so far (1933), fast, light, seaworthy. The rig is Marconi, a twenty-five-foot mast. It is a picturesque little yard, a construction shed or two on a tiny salt creek flowing into Annisquam River, and maybe a dozen of the dainty little cats, being rigged and finished for shipment, in a row by the launching stage. Mr. Montgomery himself designed the lines of the original "Fish", another case of a native genius like Archie Fenton of Gloucester memory. He has had imitators. But nothing turned out could compete in a race with the true "Fish". As I wanted a boat that would be able in short, choppy seas on lakes and sounds of different behavior than the ocean seas around Annisquam, I took slight liberties with the Fish class forefoot. The true stem has a radius of not less than three feet and sweeps up in a long curve that gives finer entrance lines but less lift forward against short, steep seas. As may be noted by the drawings herewith, a two-foot radius was chosen for the stem, the lines being otherwise about those of the true "Fish."

16 pages, 1 plate(s)

8.01€
How to Build a Kyack (Pub. No. 5128)

by Sam Rabl

Spring time and reminiscences—dreams of years ago and of how as a pair of high school kids we built our first boat. No glorious Spanish argosy looked half so wonderful to our eyes as did that little hooker built over a frame of barrel hoops and strips of cull lumber secured from a nearby box factory. The covering was the unique part of the job. Somewhere we had seen the plans of a boat built from paper and as we could not afford canvas to cover our frame, we covered it with many layers of newspaper. Each layer was pasted to the one beneath it with a mixture of tar filched from a nearby tar barrel and rosin secured from the scrapings of whisky barrels stored behind a neighboring distillery. With fingers blistered from the molten mixture we proud1y launched our creation and much to the surprise of bystanders and ourselves it floated. We used this craft for two seasons. Our next creation was a pair of twin kyacks, this time covered with brown wrapping paper, each layer set down with varnish. A canvas deck kept out the water and for five years we cruised these little hookers into the far reaches of our beloved home waters in Chesapeake Bay. To those to whom a canoe only means a party on the quiet waters of an inland stream the little boat described in this article will have no appeal, but to the man who likes his cruising on rough water and does not want to wait for his weather the kyack will find its greatest appeal.

6 pages, 2 plate(s)

6.22€
Shingle--An Auto Campers Boat (Pub. No. 5129)

by Arthur C. Klust and Ray F. Kuns

"Shingle” is a light but sturdy little rowboat which can be carried on top of the car on the hunting or fishing trip. The plans given here also show how to adapt the boat for use with an outboard motor.

The neat little tub shown in the photos was designed and built by Ray F. Kuns, an amateur at boat-building, but a veteran sportsman who has felt the need of a companionable small boat to carry along on his wanderings in the wildernesses. The marvelous success of the “Shingle” design is without doubt due to the fact that her builder worked with the idea of efficiency superseding elegance or beauty of line. The completed boat, as built by Mr. Kuns, weighs somewhat under one hundred pounds, and is easily carried on top of a car. She rides nicely, and two men find no difficulty in loading or launching her from this position. If she is hauled on a small trailer, one fellow can handle her alone. According to her designer,“Shingle” fairly eats rough water.

12 pages, 2 plate(s)

7.12€
Guppy--A 5-ft Sailor (Pub. No. 5130)

Designed by John Burroughs

Here’s five feet of fun for the whole family. It’s a youngster’s sailboat that Dad can build in a week end with two panels of fir plywood and help from the kids. This pudgy little five-footer is an ideal boat to teach the children how to sail in a swimming pool or a lake. Its sturdy construction will take a beating from active pint-size sailors, yet it is so light that they can carry it around. Smaller than the real thing but bigger than a toy, the five-footer will make a hit with all miniature mariners.

8 pages, 3 plate(s)

7.12€
11 Ft 3 Inch Outboard (Pub. No. 5131)

Designed by Edwin Monk, Naval Architect

Here’s the answer for all ‘round boating—a trim little speedster that’s a fishing, family and sports boat. This neat 11-footer combines cartop weight with seaworthy stability usually found only in larger craft. Steps nimbly along equipped with a 5 or 10 hp outboard motor. Easy to launch, easy to maintain. Simple yet efficient design is made-to-order for the amateur to build at low cost with the perfect boat material, exterior fir plywood

12 pages, 6 plate(s)

8.01€
13 Ft. 4 Inch Outboard (Pub. No. 5132)

Designed by Edwin Monk, Naval Architect

A true sportsman’s boat with good looks and top performance—yet designed for the amateur builder working on a modest budget. May be built as a snappy runabout or modified to a general utility boat. Speeds to 35 mph with 5 to 25 hp motors. Generous freeboard provides extra safety and stability in rough water Plenty of comfort and leg room. Smooth-handling maneuverability makes it as popular in crowded waters as in large lakes.

12 pages, 7 plate(s)

8.01€
13 Ft. 9 Inch Punt (Pub. No. 5133)

Designed by Frank E. Strickland, Naval Architect

This roomy fishing and duck boat has the flat-bottom stability needed for casting and shooting. Easy to handle with oars, it skims along spryly with a light outboard motor. Shallow draft makes it the ideal swamp boat--lets you get in where the big ones bite. Plenty, of working room for fishing or hunting partner, fishing gear, decoys. Simple to build with rugged exterior fir plywood.

7 pages, 5 plate(s)

7.12€
15 Ft. Knockabout (Pub. No. 5134)

Designed by Edwin Monk, Naval Architect

Generous freeboard and clean lines distinguish this simple, well-designed Knockabout. Though its performance delights experts, the craft is what its name implies, a safe, stable sailboat for family fun on inland water. Anyone can build it, for the joinery involved is straightforward carpentry. Planking is exterior-type fir plywood, which makes any boat easy to build—and when built, better.

12 pages, 6 plate(s)

8.01€
15-Ft. Outboard (Pub. No. 5135)

Designed by Frank E. Strickland, Naval Architect

A big, open-water boat that will stand the gaff for a lifetime of boating pleasure Takes a 25 hp motor with an ease that will put you at the front of the fleet. Sweeping lines, from clean-cut bow to beamy transom, indicate its exceptional seaworthiness. Ample room to stow all your gear for two weeks’ camping cruise—-and it has the strength and power to carry it gracefully. The average handyman can build this big, all-purpose beauty with little trouble

14 pages, 4 plate(s)

8.01€
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