Booklets

Our Booklets offer substantive narratives excerpted from larger well-known works or stand-alone articles from the periodical literature. Booklets measure 5.5"x 8.5" and contain between 4 and 48 pages and most have a number of plates in addition

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Wanderer (Pub. No. 5178)

by D.H. Smith

This 23-footer is an experienced world traveler.

With increased outboard engine horsepowers, it has been practical within recent years to operate some fairly large cruisers and other types of craft with this form of 2-cycle power. Wanderer is a big beamy craft which certainly represents the larger classification of outboard cruising boats. Because of her size and design characteristics, several cabin arrangements are possible within her spacious hull. Within reason, her performance will not be appreciably affected by certain optional interior arrangements as they will not cause significant differences in loading characteristics. She possesses a fairly deep-V entrance and a good clean run of her aft body lines which will give her a good turn of speed with a minimum of pounding. Recommended horsepower is two 35 or 40 horsepower outboard engines in either long or standard shaft versions, depending on the transom height chosen. "Wanderer’s" stability is excellent due to her considerable beam and ample deadrise. With a generous flare in her topsides, she will be a dry boat when running in choppy seas.

4 pages, 3 plate(s)

£5.41
Jet Joe (Pub. No. 5179)

by William D. Jackson, Naval Architect

A Sturdy, High-Speed Utility Racing Hydroplane and/or Ski Boat

Put it in water and—like a certain widely advertised soap—Jet Joe does everything. Not only does it do double duty as a utility and sports boat—hauling passengers, pulling water skiers and the like—but it also qualifies as a closed-course and marathon racer, fulfilling all requirements of the American Power Boat and National Outboard associations for sanctioned racing with stock, two-cylinder outboard motors of the Evinrude Bi~ Twin type.

16 pages, 5 plate(s)

£6.97
Zipp (Pub. No. 5180)

by William D. Jackson, Naval Architect

If you want a fast, sporty, and highly manouverable hydroplane, "Zipp's" your baby. Designed to be used with outboard motors of from 10 to 50 hp, it is a little over 13 ft. long and has a 59½ in. beam. "Zipp" seats 2 passengers in small after-cockpit, and, if you have another intrepid pair of friends who want to come along, you can lift the forward hatch clear and take off as a foursome.

10 pages, 2 plate(s)

£6.19
Voyageur (Pub. No. 5181)

by William D. Jackson, Navel Architect

If you are looking for the ideal family cabin cruiser designed especially for the backyard builder, this is it. It will comfortably carry six adults for day cruising and sleep 4 (two in the cabin and two in the cockpit) for overnight cruises. Because it will float in 3 tin. of water, with the outboard motor swung up, it’s an excellent craft for shallow-water rivers and lakes. Scow-type hull makes it possible to run the bow right up on the beach so passengers may step ashore dry shod. When powered with a 1956, 30 hp Evinrude Big Twin outboard, "Voyageur ' has a top speed of 20 mph with two people aboard. Planing action begins at 12 mph.

16 pages, 5 plate(s)

£6.97
Sun Fish (Pub. No. 5182)

by William D. Jackson, Naval Architect

Novel scow-bow design on this 375-lb., outboard-powered cruiserette permits easy beaching.

"Sun Fish" is an unconventional looking cruiserette which weighs only 375 pounds and is powered by an outboard, It can be transported by trailer easily and has accommodations for two persons for overnight trips. The scow-type bow allows it to be landed on shelving beaches, which means dry feet for the passengers on embarking. As for speed, the "Sun Fish" will do 5 to 35 mph. A 5 hp outboard motor will propel "Sun Fish" about 6 mph while a 10 hp motor will shove the loaded hull with two persons aboard at an 8 mph clip. With speeds of over 16 mph, planing action takes place and speeds of 10 to 35 mph are possible. Construction of "Sun Fish" is simple. No difficult joinery work is necessary.

6 pages, 2 plate(s)

£5.41
Sea Rover (Pub. No. 5183)

by William D. Jackson, Naval Architect

This 3-in-I ocean-going outboard can be built as a sports, utility or cabin model in either a 15 or 17 ft. length.

What's your cruising pleasure? Chances are, this adaptable design has what you want. If a stylish open water sportster is what you have in mind, fine; if you prefer a cabin cruiser, Sea Rover be made in that style, too. Or if you just want to get around with ease, there’s the economy style outboard model of Sea Rover. And that isn’t all. If the 15-foot length of the original version is too snug for you, for a few more dollars you can convert this plan to a 17-footer. If you have trouble getting exterior grade plywood, you can use the lap strake planking instead of plywood covering. And, finally, you even have a choice of motor mountings for rough or smooth waters.

24 pages, 6 plate(s)

£7.74
Screwball (Pub. No. 5184)

by William D. Jackson, Naval Architect

Pram type boats are not new, but this version of the type is. It has all the latest wrinkles: adaptability to plywood construction, easy fabrication, and a convex bottom with non-trip chines affording maneuverability at any speed "Screwball" will ordinarily be driven.  Add to these features the well-known carrying ability and stability of the pram an dyou have a highly useful and adaptable service and utility craft.

8 pages, 3 plate(s)

£6.19
Sea Mate--A Rugged Sea-worthy Skiff (Pub. No. 5185)

by William D. Jackson, Naval Architect

The design for this rugged seaworthy boat was taken from proven sea skiffs used by fishermen for generations. It has been brought up to date so that the backyard boat builder can use newer materials and still retain the durability and seaworthiness of original designs. "Sea Mate" was built with a plywood bottom and lapped plank sides; however, plywood may be used for the sides or board and batten construction may be used for the sides and bottom. This wide choice of building materials will enable you to make a faithful reproduction of this little boat with the materials at hand regardless of what part of the world you live in. It is powered with a Trollabout inboard marine engine. This small air-cooled engine utilizes the same efficient method of propulsion as ocean liners—namely, a 2 to 1 reduction gear that permits the engine to turn at higher efficient speeds while propeller speed is reduced by one-half. Integral gear box has lever controlled setting for forward, neutral and reverse.

16 pages, 3 plate(s)

£6.97
Widgett (Pub. No. 5186)

by William D. Jackson, Naval Architect.

Try this beamy utility boat. You’ll like its simplified construction

Building "Widgett" requires only ordinary tools and no steam bending. It may be built in a fraction of the time required for ordinary utility boats. It is beamy and stable on any waters anywhere and, despite its simplified construction, is immensely strong, and durable enough to give you real service. Everything about "Widgett" has been planned so that it can be built in quantity, quickly and cheaply, either for livery service or by boat builders who wish to earn a reasonable profit with a first rate design. However, if your intentions are to build just one boat for personal use, this boat will out-perform most any ordinary boat of its clhss sold on the market today.

6 pages, 1 plate(s)

£5.41
Sea Flea (Pub. No. 5187)

by William D. Jackson

Two plywood panels sandwiching a bare minimum of inner framing make up the unusual constructipn of this demon midget sailer. Also out of the ordinary for today’s sailing craft, though the type goes back about 1500 years, is its sailing rig—the lug rig—which is better suited to a small craft such as "Sea Flea" then the more usual Marconi rig. The Marconi rig would require a taller mast with many stays and spreadera; the lug rig utilizes short, easily dismantled spars that can be carried atop an auto as conveniently as the boat itself.

12 pages, 1 plate(s)

£6.19
Cat's Paw (Pub. No. 5188)

by David M. Swartout

White, sails, two hulls, and cat-quick speed with this 12-ft. catamaran sailer

Old-time, dyed-in-the-wool sailors sometimes look askance at sailing catamarans because of their unorthodox design. But these same sailors are usually looking ahead at them in a race because of the cats’ speed. For their length, catamarans can carry extra large sails aloft due to the wide, stable platform of the two hulls. More sail area to pick up the wind means more push, and any horsepower jockey knows that more push means more speed. But for the individual who just likes to spread white sails against blue water and isn’t worried about winning races, "Cat’s Paw" has other advantages. She’s easy to build because of the straight-sided hulls. The sheer line is flat and that simplifies building the form. Bow and stern are straight, so there’s no cockeyed bevel to fit and fuss with. "Cat’s Paw" is an ideal boat to learn or practice sailing in, because she will forgive so many mistakes. Operators of boys’ camps should consider building a fleet of these catamarans to add sailing to their water activities program. Boys will get a feeling of speed, learn the rudiments of sailing without worrying about capsizing if a gust of wind hits them at the wrong angle or if they mishandle her in a stiff breeze.

28 pages, 4 plate(s)

£7.74
Rapid Robert (Pub. No. 5189)

by Thomas B. Riley

"Rapid Robert" is a type known as a MacKenzie River boat, designed for those wild rivers with fast, rough currents. It is a raked, smooth-bottomed, sturdy rowboat, able to twist and turn on a dime, with a high, buoyant stern that will shoot through rapids which would sink the best of other craft. In fact, you are safer in rapids with "Rapid Robert" than you are in a canoe. This boat also performs satisfactorily as an ordinary rowboat, and, for cruising on more gentle waters, a removable section of the high transom may be slipped out to attach a 1 to 9 hp. outboard motor. You need no forms or molds for this boat. Planking and frames are simply cut, beveled, and assembled, thus giving the correct shape and form. Construction is of waterproof marine plywood; the 14 ft. length sheet is correct for this hull. No nails are used anywhere and all screws should have lead holes drilled before fastening.

12 pages, 1 plate(s)

£6.19
Build a Surf-Sail-Ice Boat (Pub. No. 5190)

by C. T. Allen

Without a doubt you can have a whale of a lot of fun with this little craft, using it as a sailboat, paddleboard, sunbathing raft, aquaplane and, yes, even as an Iceboat, The fact is, my family and I had so much fun with it on the lake last summer that we hated to lay it up for the winter. So that’s why I developed the extra iceboat frame structure shown, which turns this craft into an all-year-around fun boat. "Surf-Sail", as she is called, handles like any sailboat. It tacks nicely, comes about readily and points well into the wind. Of course, she’s no luxury cruiser, so either wear a pair of bathing trunks or expect to get your pants wet when you use it on the lake in the summertime. You’ll find that "Surf-Sail" is easy to build (it took me only 30 hours) and even with the iceboat frame and runners added, it should cost comparatively little, even if you add the iceboat conversion. The conversion unit will be a good investment, however, if you live in a northern clime.

16 pages, 5 plate(s)

£6.97
Canvas Kayak (Pub. No. 5191)

by Hi Sibley

This 10-footer not only has Vee-bottorn stability, but also a wider-than average beam.

While this 10-foot kayak is designed primarily for the 6-to-12-year-olds it can be built to accommodate an adult by increasing the distances between the frames and using heavier battens, but retaining the same beam. It is by no means a toy; its construction follows accepted practic

4 pages, 2 plate(s)

£5.41
Basic Navigation for the Beginner (Pub. No. 5193)

by Elbert Robberson

"Navigation? Who needs it! I've just got a small boat, and I'm just going to splash around the bay. I'll be in sight of land the whole time." Then a squall makes up, or fog drops a curtain all around. Sure, you know where land is--but exactly which directions should you steer to get there? And how about those rocks along the shore? . . . .Anyone operating a boat, no matter what its size, needs to know some navigation--must be able to determine position and plto the course and time toa  desitnation. Fortunately, anyone can do this. With or without the help of a nautical almanac or a sextant, fog or no fog. Here--minus the trapping of astronomy, azimuths and hyperbolic functions--is all thenavigation you need to know.

20 pages

£6.97
Rebuilding Boats (Pub. No. 5195)

by William D. Jackson

Tips for rebuilding and improving 12 to 26 foot ouboard or inboard boats.

Can you get a good buy in a used boat--one which is not quite suited to your needs? Thi smight be a good investment if you plan and make your own alterations. The acquisition of a sound hull eliminates the patient labor necessary to construct a boat, and with little extra material the hull may be adapted to your purposes. Heres' how to get started.

9 pages

£6.19
Make the Rabl Simplified Sextant (Pub. No. 5196)

With this easily constructed instrument you can learn the fundamentals of navigation

by Sam Rabl

When an article on shooting the sun and stars with a sextant appeared in the last edition of How to build 20 Boats, many of our readers became interested in the sextand and its use. The instrument has many uses other than navigation, and while the regular dextant is beyond the capabilities of the home workshop, the one described here will do most of the proefessional sextant's tricks. It is made from very ordinary materials, most of which can be found around the home.

12 pages

£6.19
Restless (Pub. No. 5197)

by Gerald Taylor White

LOA 17' 4", BEAM 4', 91/2" DRAUGHT 61/2", SAIL AREA 100 SQ. FT..

Want speed under sail? Here is your answer, for "Restless" was designed with just that requirement in mind. Her shallow V-bottom, short overhangs, and tall inboard rig are all earmarks of a fastsailing racer. The object of the double cockpit is twofold: first to provide strong cross bracing to take the strain when she is sailing with the crew hiked out to windward, and second to keep the helmsman and sheet tender from getting in each other’s way. As all sheets belay on the deck between the cockpits, it is possible to sail the boat singlehanded without getting a tangle of lines in the cockpit. If you are wise, you’ll put that deck in just as it is shown. When you aren’t racing and want to carry some extra passengers, there is still room for them—-in fact, the deck itself makes an excellent seat for those who don’t mind ducking at the order, “Ready about!”

8 pages, 4 plate(s)

£6.19
Sassy--A Rough Water Runabout (Pub. No. 5198)

by Charles M. Ungerbuehler, Yacht Designer

LOA 21' 2", BEAM 7' 21/2", WEIGHT 3275 LBS.

Some runabout owners want their boats to be as fast as possible; others desire their craft to be comfortable in rough going. For this latter class, "Sassy" has been created. Her construction is on the fairly heavy side and her lines have been worked out to produce an easy-running boat. The drawings show a V-8 Mercury marine conversion. Any good marine engine weighing not over 650 lbs. and developing not over 100 hp. could be used.

8 pages, 4 plate(s)

£6.19
Ishkoodah--An Express Cruiser (Pub. No. 5199)

by Gerald Taylor White

LOA 25' 0", DRAUGHT 24", BEAM 8' 13/4",WEIGHT 5275 LBS.

Here is a high-speed cruiser with hull and superstructure of the ultramodern type. She has the sleek, racy, sparkling style of a runabout plus good cruising accommodations for two. Her streamlined cabin, which adds to rather than detracts from her beauty, contains two extra-wide berths, a watercloset under a seat, a big wardrobe, other lockers for general gear, and a galley that is better than those often found on boats of much greater length. Obviously there isn’t full headroom in the cabin (if the cabin top were raised high enough for headroom, her beauty and speed would be ruined), but you’ll live in her immense cockpit most of the time you’re awake anyway, so who needs headroom? She has a V-bottom hull of the sawed-frame type and thus is as easy to build as it is possible to make a boat. Her afterbody is of the parallel-buttock or inonohedron type; so the water flowing beneath the hull cannot close in and form speed-cutting eddies, but instead is thrown clear without any major change in the flow lines. Power her with an engine ranging from 80 hp. upwards. Almost any of the popular automobile conversions would be ideal. One of these hulls equipped with a hopped-up Ford V-8 turned in a speed of just under 25 m.p.h. Another with an ordinary 100-hp. V-8 turning at only 2,000 r.p.m. did 15 m.p.h. These are not “catalog” figures dreamed up by armchair copywriters, but are actual speeds made in time trials conducted in accordance with the standards of the Society of Small Craft Designers.

13 pages, 5 plate(s)

£6.97
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