Power Boat Plans

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Build a Towboat for Solo Water Skiing (Pub. No. 5451)

by C. Claude Tabor

A control stick replaces the towrope to put you in charge of both the steering and the speed of this midget outboard.

Be independent! If you get a sudden impulse to water ski, why waste time rounding up somebody to pilot the towboat? With this clever rig you can solo. It's a 71/2-foot outboard that features safe maneuverability, a steering mechanism on the transom, and a V bottom for good stability in rough water. I dimensioned the hull so it can be built with standard materials from the local lumber-yard which keeps costs down..

7 pages, 3 plate(s)

$7.95
Build this Miniature 3-Pt. Hydroplane (Pub. No. 5459)

by Hal Admonson

How about an exciting new, easy-to-build boat for the younger set? This sharply-styled 9-ft. 3-pt. suspension miniature hydroplane designed by Hal Adamson is unsinkable because of its Plyfoam and fiberglass construcitonk weighs only 68 lbs., and will do about 25 mph owered by a remote-controlled 6-hp outboard.

8 pages, 2 plate(s)

$7.95
Build the Scottish Schooner (Pub. No. 5460)

by Hal Kelly

The Scots—knowledgeable as they are in the methods of thrift (stretching a penny as far as it will stretch) —have a way of taking an ordinary substance, disguising it cleverly, giving it a fancy name and getting unexpected mileage out of it. Witness Scotch Woodcock, which turns out not to be related to pheasant under glass at all, but is scrambled eggs and fish paste on toast. Thus we have the Scottish Schooner. It’s actually a 15½-ft. runabout, but it is so successfully designed to get the maximum use out of limited space and so economical to operate, it might as well be a schooner. The little craft is also almost 5½ ft. wide and 31½ in. deep. No wonder its payload is rated at six adults plus storage. It’s fine for offshore fishing and will troll for hours for mere pennies. Or you can just put-put around in it. For a power plant you’ll want a small air-cooled engine. A 4-hp Clinton, picked up at a close-out for $55, was used on the original Scottish Schooner. The craft will take a mill that pumps out 40 horses—with no problem—but then it wouldn’t be Scottish. If you use an air-cooled engine of less than 10 hp you’ll have ample power and you won’t need to register the boat.

7 pages, 3 plate(s)

$7.95
Budget Houseboat, A (Pub. No. 5463)

by Hal Kelly

The Budget Houseboat is like a camper that goes on water.

She's 20 ft. long with a 9-ft. beam, containing 300 sq. ft. of usable floor area. This means that while she can accomodate two in outrageous comfort, she can easily take a family of four on an extended vacation and be entirely self-contained. There are two full-size permanent bunks in the forward section of the cabin. The dining table, in the rear section of the cabin, seats four and then drops down to convert into an extra bunk 6 ft. 4 in. long and, 38 in. wide. Cabin headroom is 6 ft. 2 in., and two cots can be stationed to the rear of the cabin area. In the second place, The Budget Houseboat’s storage and work areas are just as much a marvel. She features a large-size enclosed head up front, room for a 4½-cu.-ft. fridge, sink and two-burner stove in the galley, storage and drawer under the sink, and storage under the bunks, dining table, rear cockpit, and in other scattered areas. Part of the storage in the cabin is a 2-ft-wide. hanging closet. The deck area doesn’t end on the cabin level. The Budget Houseboat sports a full flying bridge more than 6x9 ft. in size, with more storage area in it. The bridge has an alternate steering console, two seats and deck area for a couple of lounge chairs, plus the capability of taking a convertible Bimini top. But that’s not all. The Budget Houseboat may sound like a barge from the foregoing, but she handles like a dream. The little home-on-the-water-away-from-home is designed to hang a 30-hp outboard, and with this kind of power she can do 15 mph with four people aboard! Her draft is only 4 in. Piloting from the bridge is the way to go. Back her off to a cruising speed of 8 mph and the motor is just a whisper with gas consumption minimal. It’s quiet enough so you can listen to a radio under way. Two side windows slide open sideways, the front window in the cabin wings up, and there’s a good-size hatch-cover up front that can be opened to let the breeze drift through the boat. And there’s more. Since The Budget Houseboat is trailerable, you never have to worry about the campgrounds being full, on the water or on the roat When you're ready to camp just throw out the anchor and settle down for the night.

12 pages, 4 plate(s)

$7.95
Zenith, A Hand 25-foot Cruiser (Pub. No. 5468)

Designed by Wm. H. Hand, Jr.

Now, who would like a fine little cruiser? We have had plans for runabouts in all sizes from 15 feet up and also a cruiser in the larger sizes. Here are some plans for a crackerjack little cruiser of only 25 feet length. Imagine the joys of sailing about on a handy little boat like this fitted with a 20 h. p. Kermath motor neatly tucked away under the bridge. Just think of the many happy days to be spent on this little boat in cruising about from one picturesque harbor to the next. Or what could be more fun than going in all the club motor boat races and winning the prizes. The busy little motor with which this boat is to be equipped is capable of pushing it along on a merry clip. One that you need not be ashamed of. You will never be the last boat back with this outfit. The hull is light and strong and the design is perfect. Only a designer of the skill and experience of Wm. H. Hand, Jr., is able to turn out a boat with such a multitude of desirable features as this one possesses. There are comfortable berths, a capacious galley, and pantry where the meals can be prepared in comfort. A roomy toilet and numerous other items! Under the cockpit floor are the gasoline tanks and a large flush hatch makes this lazarette space easily accessible for the stowage of baggage and luggage.

12 pages, 5 plate(s)

$8.95
Build the Stiletto (Pub. No. 5474)

by Art Mikesell

With sleek SK streamlining and a super-speed bottom, it’s 16 feet of high-performance ski-boat that you can build.

Here's one of he best high-speed runabouts PM has ever presented as a boat-building project. It’s designed strictly for speed, with a minimum of compromise. That broad flat bottom is built for quick getaway and maximum go, a combination which makes this a top ski boat. On the other hand, if you want to fish, run a rough chop or carry more than four people, better shop around for something a little more tame. Stiletto is a frisky thoroughbred, not a workhorse. Construction follows stock boat-building rules. All lumber over 1 in. should be “four quarters” stock finished as full as possible, which usually means from ¾ in.to 7/8 in. All lumber thicknesses under 1 in. should be considered net. Use oak, mahogany or spruce if available. Otherwise, substitute any species commonly used in boat construction in your area. All plywood must be at least exterior grade, and preferably marine grade. All joints should be glued with a hardsetting glue of the resorcinol or plastic-resin type. Fastenings should be hot-dipped galvanized or bronze.

10 pages, 3 plate(s)

$7.95
Sixteen Foot Half-Cabin Cruiser, A (Pub. No. 5482)

This sixteen foot V-bottom cruiserette has been a popular choice of the amateur builder in Australia, New Zealand and the Pacific Island for some time and here we present the layout and building instructions in detail.

Sixteen feet long, six feet beam and one foot nine inches draft, this is the ideal boat for the amateur builder and enthusiast who wants a small family cruiser. The choice of power plant would depend on the speed required by the owner, say from ten horse power for the modest yachtsman to the 250 cubic inch motor if more speed is required.

8 pages, 2 plate(s)

$7.95
Flight a 19 ft Plywood Outboard Cruiser (Pub. No. 5492)

by John Long

This fast-sailing catamaran is very light, easy to build, and will furnish many hours of pleasure to its owner. Plywood is used in the construction of the hulls, thus keeping weight and cost at a minimum.

12 pages, 4 plate(s)

$7.95
Scram II--A Flashing 15.5' Runabout (Pub. No. 5498)

by Ernest A. Johnson, N.A.

A revised and up-to-the-minute ver sion of the famous speedboat.

SCRAM II is a boat that is “tops” in beauty and speed. As you settle in the front cockpit, press the starter button and hear the powerful motor roar into life, you will be proud of owning her. When you cast off the lines and nose her out to open water where you really open her up, you will thrill at her speed and grace. Scram II can hardly be told from a Chris-Craft 15½-footer or any other factory built job, but it will cost you much less.

6 pages, 3 plate(s)

$7.95
Buzzer II--a Fourteen-foot Outboard Speedster (Pub. No. 5499)

by Ernest A. Johnson, N.A.

Here is a worthy successor to the famous “Buzzer” that scored a great hit.

“Buzzer II” preserves the best features of her predecessor, but is pointed up all along the line, and her construction has been simplified as well. “Buzzer,” proved so successful that we have decided to give you a boat of the same size and general lines as “Buzzer,” but with certain changes in the construction so that it will be easier to build. Buzzer II will have a top speed of about 35 miles an hour, which will vary somewhat with the size of the motor used.

5 pages, 3 plate(s)

$6.95
Scud--A Fast 14-Ft. Outboard (Pub. No. 5501)

by A. Mason, Naval Architect

LOA 14' 11/2", BEAM 4' 91/2", WEIGHT 250 LBS, DRAUGHT 2'.

"Scud" will be as much fun to build as to use. Her construction makes maximum use of plywood—which is light, sturdy, and watertight—-yet the hull form is fast and seaworthy. She is as modern looking as any boat in the fleet and suitable for fishing, aquaplaning, or just a fast spin over the water. She was designed to use any outboard motor from 10 to 33 hp. With a 10-hp. motor, she’ll do about 19 m.p.h.; with 22 hp., the speed will go up to 30 m.p.h.; and with 33 hp., she’ll zoom along in the neighborhood of 35 m.p.h. A single, large cockpit is often preferred in a boat generally used for fishing—-it’s slightly more comfortable and much more roomy. If this appeals to you, simply omit the bridge deck.

7 pages, 3 plate(s)

$7.95
Baby Blue--A Fast Outboard (Pub. No. 5505)

by Luther H. Tarbox, Naval Architect

LOA 15'3", BEAM 5' 0", WEIGHT 200 LBS.

If you are as disgusted with the roughwater performance of the average outboard utility boat as the writer is, then you’ll like "Baby Blue", for she is designed expressly for rough-water use. There are many stretches of water where an able outboard hull is a sterling possession: Long Island Sound, Barnegat Bay, the Delaware, the Chesapeake, the big sounds of Carolina and Georgia, the Great Lakes, Puget Sound, Mississippi Sound, and so on. All such waters require outboards such as Baby Blue. A properly designed outboard-powered skiff can be fast in smooth water, but get her out into a good chop and she will just about pound her bottom out. That’s one of the things "Baby Blue" is designed not to do. Why the name "Baby Blue?" Well, Horn Island and Petit Boise Island lie 12 miles out across Mississippi Sound from where the writer lives. On their offshore sides, just beyond the breakers, there are plenty of bluefish to be had for the catching. Since the writer has built a "Baby Blue" for his own use and also has a yen for bluefish, the name is a natural. "Baby Blue" is in no way an experimental design; she is developed from two earlier utilities. The first of these was "Mullet", a 15-foot 200-lb. boat. She rode choppy water like a duck and banked nicely on turns. With two aboard and a 5-hp. Johnson on the stern, she did 14 m.p.h. The second boat, a 15½-footer, had the same bottom as "Mullet", but had 4 in. more freeboard. She was fitted with a motor well just forward of the transom, a live-bait well, a short forward deck, and narrow side decks; so she weighed close to 300 lbs. Both the motor well and the waterscoop for the live-bait well added considerably to the resistance. Like her predecessor, she behaved perfectly.

16 pages, 3 plate(s)

$8.95
Mariner--A Classic 19ft Raised Deck Cabin Cruiser (Pub. No. 5506)

by Edwin Monk.

This boat is a miniature of the boat illustrated, a larger cruiser designed by the author, a good sea boat of trim appearance that met with favorable comment. It is intended as a complete little cruiser for two or three, and contains a large cockpit, berths, galley, and toilet, which, after all, is the nucleus of any yacht. In the small cruiser it is difficult to turn out a nice-appearing hull and still have workable headroom. In this case the large hatch in the galley provides for this where it is most needed, and there is four feet six inches headroom under the trunk beams. Forward there is a man-sized hatch, and the boat may be made fast or anchor handled without climbing on deck. A folding card table will serve as a dining-table in the cockpit, and folding camp-stools are suggested; also a canvas cot will accommodate an extra voyager.

11 pages, 2 plate(s)

$7.95
Flash--A Snappy Classic 14' Runabout (Pub. No. 5536)

Feature for feature, and inch for inch, “Flash” offers more boat per dollar than many other craft. Here is a 14-footer which can be built in a reasonable length of time and, with the possible exception of the engine and equipment, at a nominal cost. She has generous freeboard, trim lines, and her single cockpit offers seating capacity for two or three persons . Powered with a 40 h. p. marine motor of standard make, “Flash” will show a speed of close to 28 miles per hour with the “mill” doing 3100 r.p.m. With a smaller, two cylinder motor of any make, she will make an excellent boat for cruising and fishing trips.

18 pages, 2 plate(s)

$8.95
Here's Dolphin (Pub. No. 5550)

This trailer boat, the "Dolphin", is the answer to low-cost travel over protected waters. The hull is light enough to be transported anywhere by trailer and the boat is of a size to be easily handled. It will accommodate two persons for extended trips or a party of four for day cruises and do it comfortably. Construction and operating costs are low. Plywood is used throughout, and the hull is designed to exact the utmost from low power motors. Any engine of 2½ to 8 horsepower will do. One like the U. S. Falcon 21/2 hp. water cooled marine engine will provide very low operating costs with a maximum number of miles per gallon of fuel consumed. This has been proved.

8 pages, 2 plate(s)

$7.95
Crack--An Outboard Runabout (Pub. No. 5551)

Crack! Yes-sir, just that—”of superior excellence,” as Mr. Webster puts it. Here is a double cockpit runabout, which, given a suitable motor, will perform in a smother of spray with whip-like speed. Even with the narrow beam of 52 in. which makes this high speed possible,  “Crack” is dry and seaworthy, the generous flare to the forward sections giving the craft great lifting power in a sea while keeping off the spray.  Looking her over, you will notice that “Crack” is an even 16 ft. long, thereby falling into a class of outboards which need not be numbered. There are two cockpits, each comfortably seating two passengers. Complete remote control is possible with a short-type steerer with gas, choke and starter cables to an electricstarting outboard motor. There is a small hatch immediately forward of the motor well which allows of the installation of a reserve gas tank, storage battery, autopulse or other necessary equipment; otherwise, the hatch gives plenty of stowage space for clothing, fishing tackle and the like. The forward part of the boat is accessible from the forward cockpit and affords a convenient place for storing oars, anchors, and such odds and ends as will not be harmed by the small amount of water which, in every boat, collects in the bilge. Each seat also furnishes another dry, clean locker which can be used to good advantage. Never can there be too much locker space.

20 pages, 6 plate(s)

$9.95
Jazz Baby--12 Foot Multi-Purpose Boat (Pub. No. 5553)

"Jazz Baby" is an accomplished portable outboard runabout performing all its tasks well. Outstanding features of this multi-purpose boat are: easy rowing, trim design, ability to maneuver well with small outboard motors, portability, and surprisingly high speeds with motors of 6 to 15 hp. Built-in beveled chines make this boat unusually safe while a new type bottom assures satisfactory operation at low or high speeds.  Constructed of waterproof marine plywood, the hull is easy to build, light in weight, and permanently leakproof. The boat is seaworthy and stable. It is easily transported anywhere.

12 pages, 1 plate(s)

$7.95
Torpedo--A Fast 131/2 Foot Runabout (Pub. No. 5554)

Fast, safe and comfortable is the “Torpedo”—a distinctive runabout that skims over the water at race-boat speeds and carries four passengers in a capacious hull that will remain leakproof and light in weight during a lifetime of usage.  Marine plywood is used to cover the sides, bottom and deck, and besides dispensing with considerable labor in construction, the use of this material provides a boat that is strong and inexpensive to build and run. If the larger outboard motors from 10 hp. up are used, high speeds with economy of operation will result with lower fuel cost per mile due to the highly efficient planing action of the hull. This runabout, with speeds rivaling any racing hull, is not necessarily confined to such usage. Its commodious accommodations permit it to be used as a day cruising craft afloat, comparable to the auto ashore.

12 pages, 2 plate(s)

$7.95
Victory--A 12-14-16 Foot Runabout (Pub. No. 5555)

All requirements for an outboard runabout are met in the “Victory” sport runabout. Due to a new method of bottom design, the hull is fast, stable, handles well at all speeds with different sized motors, and has trim and attractive lines. Built of waterproof marine plywood, the construction is simplified and produces a lightweight, strong hull suitable for many uses. To meet every possible requirement of readers, the hull is designed so that it can be built in 12-, 14-, or 16-ft. lengths by making a few simple changes in these plans. This boat is a good project for winter work.

16 pages, 1 plate(s)

$8.95
Building Popular Flyer A Racing Hydroplane (Pub. No. 5556)

Speed is the outstanding feature of the  “Popular Flyer,” which was designed and built  along the same lines as the trophy-winning models. Every step in the construction of the boat is clearly shown so that you will have no difficulty in building a similar one. The craft may be built of cypress, mahogany or Washington red cedar.

16 pages, 3 plate(s)

$8.95
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