Power Boat Plans

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Building Rocket--A 15 Foot Inboard Hydroplane (Pub. No. 5557)

by William D. Jackson, N.A.

The “Rocket” is a boat designed for those who like their boats fast and sporty but still inexpensive to build and operate.  Any motor, with or without reverse gear, will power the “Rocket.” Auto motors that develop more than 35 horsepower, if of light weight, high speed design, will do nicely. Marine motors of similar high speed, light weight design will perform even better.

8 pages, 2 plate(s)

$7.95
Dragonfly--10 Foot Outboard Hydroplane (Pub. No. 5558)

"Dragonfly” is a hydroplane that is adapted to all classes of outboard motors from the 4 hp. rowboat motor to the largest racing engines. Streamlined in design, the constructional features are unique and present such developments as extended motor wells for quick planing action, and a combination of vee and convex bottom for safe and super-efficient high speed operation with low and high powered outboard motors.  Construction is simple. It calls for three transverse frames, and a plywood covered hull, offering a boat that is fast in operation, extremely strong, and light in weight. The removable motor board affords a means of adapting the hull to various motors while easily made plywood stabilizers provide safe turns at high speed.

12 pages, 1 plate(s)

$7.95
Porpoise--A Rough Water Outboard (Pub. No. 5559)

by Sam Rabl

LOA 15' 6", BEAM 5' 6", DRAUGHT 7"

If you are looking for a bang-up seagoing outboard boat that is inexpensive and easy to build—-one which will give you entire satisfaction-—then Porpoise is it! Born among a litter of balsa chips on a drafting board, Porpoise grew to a scale model that was later powered with a little Herkimer Bantam model-airplane motor. From that, she grew to a full-size lady who will take anything the Chesapeake Bay has to throw at her and will beat any other boat powered with an equal engine. The prime object in designing "Porpoise" was to get the most out of the money invested. Good oak is fairly expensive these days and even then one can never be entirely sure of its quality. I have watched the ordinary garden varieties of North Carolina Pine, which may be bought at any lumber yard, and have seen it hold up side-by-side with oak. Take this pine and treat it with Cuprinol and you are money in hand. With its use in mind, all the sizes of the boat were designed for stock one-by-twos and one-by-threes.

12 pages, 5 plate(s)

$8.95
Cruisette--A Cabin Outboard Runabout (Pub. No. 5565)

by William Jackson

The Cub Cruisette is a brand new design in outboard cabin craft. Its lines eresemble motor torpedo boats with new and attractive cabin accomodations which are especialy adapted to the needs of the outboard of rsmall boat entusiast. Besides utilzing outboard motors, this boat may also be powered with air cooled inboards or, if the construction is strengthened, small high power inboard engines may be used for high speeds, since the efficiency of this craft is alsmost constant with high or low power. Generous beam and ample depth provide all the room desired on this boat, and with an economical outboard of low power, you'll be able to go anywhere almost any time at a cost that is surprisingly low.

6 pages, 2 plate(s)

$6.95
Shore Lark--A Speedy 13 Foot Runabout (Pub. No. 5566)

Fast, safe, and seaworthy on almost any waters, this general utility runabout will afford long happy hours of sport and repay its construction many times. Adapted to the use of outboard motors from 1 to 24 hp., the utility runabout will plane safely, at speeds from 5 to 45 mph and easily carry four or five persons depending upon its power. Designed to elminate difficult joiner work, the “Shore Lark” is easy to build and presents a lightweight sturdy hull that one can build for a fraction of the amount he would have to pay for a finished boat of this type.

12 pages, 1 plate(s)

$7.95
Sea Bass (Pub. No. 5568)

by William F. Crosby

"Sea Bass" is a double-cabin power cruiser, 30 feet overall length, 9 feet beam and has a draft of 2 feet 3 inches. She is designed for a Kermath Sea Master, 6 -cylinder engine, although a similar engine with power between 25 and 50 hp. will be suitable.The headroom in Sea Bass runs from 5 feet to 5 feet 8 inches.

8 pages, 5 plate(s)

$7.95
Titan (Pub. No. 5575)

by Charles Bell

A Full Headroom, Light, “Convertible” Cruiser

Her dimensions are: 19’ 3” over-all length 8’ beam, 6’ 3” in the cabin 12” to 14” draft, depending upon how much built-ins are in the interior arrangement. Weight, including motor, is 2,200 lbs. Titan was designed for the man who wants the lightest and smallest, yet the biggest cruiser he can build that is practical for long hauls on a trailer, so that he can explore the large inland waters and coastal waters far from his ordinary haunts. She is not meant to cross oceans or to fight heavy seas and storms, yet she is a very stable, seaworthy boat if handled properly and if she has some ballast added to her bilges for rough water conditions. Trimmed as designed, she will plane easily and nose into shore like any outboarder because of the fact that she has the Universal motor “C” drive for power. The advantages of the “C” drive are obvious. The drive handles the same as an outboard as to kicking up over obstructions; it places the propeller in a direct line with the line of thrust—thus lessening vibration because all the blades work all the time, unlike a prop which is slanted down at 10 to 12 degrees from the line of thrust or forward motion. And the greatest advantage over the outboard is, of course, fuel economy and more real usable horsepower. Titan has enough flotation in her hull construction to remain afloat if swamped, and if the builder wants more protection he can add 12 cubic feet of Styrofoam—tucked away in her insides—which will give him over 2,200 pounds of positive flotation, not counting the wood in the boat. The large cockpit—six feet four by seven feet six—has enough room on each side of the motor box—in itself only 28” x 34”—to install two full-size pipe berths, so that when the convertible top is in place for the night the boat will sleep four people in comfort. There is room in the cabin for a large double berth forward with a W.C. under, galley sink and stove on one side and ice chest and food lockers on the other.

8 pages, 4 plate(s)

$7.95
Stormy Petrel--A 26 ft Trailerable Cuddy Cruiser (Pub. No. 5590)

by Sam Rabl

"Stormy Petrel" was designed for the man who has already built his first boat. The construction, while in no way complex, requires some knowledge of boatbuilding, and to that end some of the minor details which are usually shown in our other boats are omitted, and the builder may draw on his own experience to supply these.  "Stormy" was designed to take advantage of the light weight of marine plywood planking and thus gain in increased speed. Her hull was modeled to take any motor up to 100 h.p. She will accommodate six people on afternoon cruises and will sleep two comfortably. If the builder desires, the berths may be fitted with hinged backs and she will sleep four in the same manner as some of the small stock cruisers of her length. While designed for plywood planking she may also be planked with ordinary planking in either of the two methods which will be described later.

12 pages, 5 plate(s)

$8.95
Loon, a 16 ft Cruising Garvey (Pub. No. 5591)

by J. A. Emmett

"Loon" is an interesting combination of, old and the new—the garvey type has proven itself through long years on our inland rivers, and the shelter-cabin adds the modern touch. In addition, marine plywood is specified wherever possible in the construction to not only make for easier building but to give a lighter longer-lasting boat.  She will be found most useful in exploring interesting winding rivers with their connected ponds and small lakes, the small cabin permitting week-end sleeping and cooking aboard and making unnecessary the invenience of a riverbank camp. While not a fast type, the flat bottom with the spoon bow drives easily through the water with a motor of from 5 h.p. up.

12 pages, 3 plate(s)

$7.95
Amigo--A 23 ft Raised Deck Cruiser (Pub. No. 5610)

by John G. Hanna

Almost everyone knows nowadays that "amigo" is a Spanish word translated “friend” in the dictionaries. As used in an informal way by our Southern neighbors, however, it often carries the meaning of our “pal” or “chum.” It is in the latter sense I have applied the name to this design.. Its a simple, informal, friendly, dependable little boat in which Pa, Ma, and the kids,. or a bunch of young fellows, can put out for a week-end, or a longer vacation, of real fun and no worries. It distinctly isn’t the boat for the show-offs who want the fastest, and therefore necessarily the lightest possible, crate in which to go tearing about a crowded harbor at 17 miles (always described by the owner as 22½.) And it isn’t the most utterly simplified, angular box that can be knocked together in a hurry. Sailors in any port in the world will admire its truly thoroughbred lines. Yet it is by no means hard or expensive to build. In many ways that 30 years of boat building experience have taught me, I have taken most of the trouble and hard jobs out of the design. Actually, it should not cost more than $30 to $45 more material, and ten days more work, to build Amigo than the 24-foot Dorothy, simplified to the last possible limit, which I designed some years ago.  Knowing the- amateur boat building public as thoroughly as I do, I know right here a lot of you who have been admiring the boat -will turn pale and back up and gasp, “Oh, but it’s a round bilge hull, with steam bent frames—so terribly hard to build! I never could do it!” That is pure essence of bunk. There are (or were, pre-war) about 50,000 boat building shops in this country. I have visited a lot of them. In every case where the builder had experience with both types, he declared the round was much the easiest and quickest and therefore cheapest, to build. And 50,000 boat builders can’t be wrong about their own business!

16 pages, 3 plate(s)

$8.95
Seaward--A 30 ft. Power Cruiser (Pub. No. 5611)

by J.J. Fanta

Those who want a comfortable moderate-sized cruiser will want "Seaward". She’s a fast, seaworthy craft, with commodious quarters fulfilling family requirements. The cockpit aft is ideal for a sizable cruising party or deep sea fishing.  Seaward is 30 feet long, huskily built and capable of 15 miles an hour with a 90 horsepower engine turning a triple-bladèd propeller. Protection against wet weather is afforded by the trim cabin, equipped with an inside steering wheel. Headroom is ample for a six-footer throughout the cabin. Complete cruising facilities are housed in the cabin, including sleeping berths for four persons, galley, lavatory and considerable locker space. The engine is readily accessible, its cover being available as an extra table for general utility. A regular table fits forward of it.

14 pages, 6 plate(s)

$8.95
Torpedo--A 13 ft Super Runabout (Pub. No. 5612)

by William Jackson

"Torpedo" could almost be called a diminutive, peace-purposed PT boat, so unusual and outstanding are its appearance, design and performance. Indeed, in proportion to its size and weight it can outspeed and outmaneuver that most renowned of small combat craft to stem from World War II. Any outboard motor of from 10 to 30 h.p. may be used, and with the more powerful engines "Torpedo's" speed becomes breathtaking. Streamlining above water gives a sleek look and cuts down air resistance, while the non-tripping chines and molded bottom are adapted to plywood construction.

12 pages, 2 plate(s)

$7.95
Discoverer (Pub. No. 5656)

by Charles Bell

LOA 22' 6", BEAM 8', DRAFT 16", DISPLACEMENT 3,000 pounds.

This is a modification of the highly successful cruiser, Adventurer, designed a few years ago
.

The lines of Discoverer have been sweetened a trifle and her aspect ratio lengthened. The power plant is a 113 h.p. C-drive inboard motor, located in the stern, and calls for some ballast in order to trim the boat properly without resorting to broadening the stern bearing with the resultant disadvantages. The weight of Discoverer is light so that ballast is needed anyway to give her some authority in the water. Her principal dimensions are: 22’6” over all, 8’ beam, 16” draft, 3,000 lbs. displacement. She has a 113 h.p. 6-cyl. motor, has 6’3” headroom and converts to sleep four. This is a real cruiser with adequate room for four to six people and is not a small tub crammed with facilities which are too small to be used. With the addition of 12 cubic feet of Styrofoam tucked away inside in out-ofthe-way places, the boat has positive flotation, a feature too often overlooked these days. She has the finest construction in her hull with a urethane foam board between fiberglass skins construction, mahogany trim finished with urethane plastic, and a teak deck. The foam plastic is perfect insulation against either heat or cold. The large cockpit is open for daytime cruising or fishing and a nylon cover quickly converts the whole boat into a livable two-cabin luxury liner at night.

8 pages, 5 plate(s)

$6.95
Mehitabel--An 18' Plywood Cruiser (Pub. No. 5669)

by Dave Beach

Reprinted from Rudder

The intense interest in inexpensive outboard powered boats for cruising has led the editors of  THE RUDDER to the realization that a modern boat of this type should be made available to amateur builders. I was commissioned to do the job, with the special request that I attempt to get away from the standard type and try to produce something different. "Mehitabel" is the result. She is 18 feet 8 inches overall, 16 feet 9 inches on the water, 7 feet 6 inches beam, 1 foot 2 inches draft, and should be able to make seventeen miles an hour with a good power plant when not overloaded.  The outboard profile shows a not too common appearance. Well forward, on a lively sheer, is a large runabout type windshield with ample side wings that protect an open cockpit with two comfortable seats and exceptional steering visibility.

8 pages, 4 plate(s)

$7.95
Placida--A 30' Houseboat (Pub. No. 5670)

by Robert M. Steward

For a summer facation on a lake or lazy river, build a 30-ft. pram bow houseboat.

The amount of water within the boundaries of our country is not ordinarily appreciated by the native coast yachtsman until his eyes are opened by an inland trip. Especially on a daylight flight the facts are realized, as innumerable placid lakes and lazy winding rivers slip in and out of view over the edges of the wings. It is only then that we become familiar with the homes of the famous inland racing scows and the majority of the thousands of outboard motors and hulls that have been produced in the past few years. For decades families have lived on these rivers in shanty boats tied to the banks. Others use this type of boat for summering amid serene surroundings as relief from the city, sometimes remaining in one favorite spot on river or lake, sometimes shifting as the spirit moves them. It is felt that the design of the scow houseboat Placida will fill the vacation need of many families.

10 pages, 3 plate(s)

$7.95
Holiday--A 20' Runabout/Cruiser Combination (Pub. No. 5671)

by William J. Deed, N.A.

Twenty ft. runabout and cruiser combination is made of plywood.

Reprinted from Rudder

Here is a small craft of moderate price offering two boats in one design, an open runabout and a cruiser for week-end or short cruises. We show one layout as an open boat, and a cabin unit of light weight which can be dropped in place to transform the boat into a cruiser. Holiday is 20 feet long, 6 feet 4 inches beam, and 2 feet 1 inch draft. Hull form is vee bottom with developable surfaces on the sides and bottom so flat plywood sheets can be bent in place. To convert the runabout into a week-end cruiser, the seat backs are hinged to let down and form a double berth, while under the seats are found a stove, galley stores, portable icebox, dishes, etc., and possibly a water closet or bucket under one of the seats.

8 pages, 6 plate(s)

$7.95
Blackfish & Tautog--2 Cruisers (Pub. No. 5672)

by Al Mason.

BLACKFISH
This round bottom, 22 ft. express cruiser is inexpensive to build.

"Blackfish" and her cousin "Tautog" were designed to meet the growing demand for a small cruiser of moderate size that would be relatively simple to build and maintain in these days of high costs. However, while there are a number of stock boats of similar size already available on the market, few are of round bottom construction. For those who prefer a round bottom boat "Blackfish" is the answer, while "Tautog" is sure to fit the bill for those who desire the more common vee bottom form. The two designs are alike in many respects but variations in hull design will slightly affect actual details and the amount of room for accommodations. The superstructures of the two boats differ considerably and are a matter of personal choice. Actually arrangement of the main deck, framing and superstructure of "Tautog" and "Blackfish" are interchangeable. Hence if a number of these boats were being built, the main deck and superstructure could be assembled as complete units and installed on either hull as preferred.

TAUTOG

The alternate plan for a faster boat features a vee bottom hull.

In any case where speed is a major consideration, attention should be given to saving weight throughout the hull by using such items as light weight controls, light tubing instead of heavy piping, and eliminating unnecessary hardware. Actually this saving of weight will have a greater effect on increasing speed and lowering costs than a larger engine and its heavier equipment.

31 pages, 10 plate(s)

$9.95
Squid--A 32' Power Boat (Pub. No. 5673)

by Carter and Wittholz

Though inexpensive to build, this handsome 32-ft. power boat proves both seaworthy and comfortable.

A boat the size of "Squid", properly equipped, will be suitable as an offshore sport fisherman. As a general purpose and day boat the large cockpit and cabin facilities will take care of large inshore fishing parties. If "Squid" is used as an out and out cruising boat two upper berths can be added forward as indicated on the arrangement plan, making it possible for four people to cruise for a week in moderate comfort. .

12 pages, 4 plate(s)

$7.95
Inland Clipper--A 31' Houseboat (Pub. No. 5674)

by Al. Mason

Exceptionally livable quarters for four people are provided in this comparatively small cruising houseboat. Length is 31 ft. 10 3/4 in.

The design shown on these pages is quite unusual, especially to those who are accustomed to seeing the staunch seaworthy boats generally found in any harbor along the coast or on the Great Lakes. In fact, the nearest approach to this type is the common scow type houseboat often seen anchored or even ashore on piles at the head end of our harbors, some of which are seldom moved year after year. This new type offers the maximum in comfort, space and accommodations and really is a home afloat.

8 pages, 6 plate(s)

$7.95
15-Ft. High-Speed Outboard Runabout (Pub. No. 5675)

by Bruce Crandall

At last—a hull designed for up-front operation. She’s safer, with plenty of beam, and speeds up to 34 mph

An outboard boat for forward steering must be designed (as are most inboard runabouts) with some fore-and-aft curvature in the planing surface, or must be considerably wider forward or narrower aft than the average outboard design. From a glance at the lines plan of this design it will be obvious that the beam admidship at the chine is much greater than in conventional designs and that the planing surface narrows down somewhat aft.  As outboard boats go, this is a quite large boat for a 15-footer, with 28” depth amidship, enough to make good headroom with a convertible top, and almost 7’ beam, about the greatest of any 15-footer available. The great beam serves the double purpose of making the boat safe at high speed and also large and stable enough for a twin outboard installation. The exceptional flare aft eliminates the possibility of the chine tripping as well as would a conventional beveled chine. This simplifies the construction somewhat. There is plenty of buoyancy and stability to carry up to five persons in perfect safety under ordinary conditions.

16 pages, 3 plate(s)

$8.95
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