Power Boat Plans

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Sea King--African Ski Boat (Pub. No. 5067)

Built for salt-water fishing five to seven miles off-shore, "Sea King" is a prime example of the African ski boat. Originally designed from the lines of the paddle skis used by lifesaving patrols and African anglers who used to paddle out past the breakers to fishing shoals, the ski boats took their name because they ski down, the breakers when coming in. Sea King includes many features designed to take as much risk as possible out of an ocean-going small craft—(1) Flat deck with self-bailing scuppers. (2) Provisions for dual outboards and it carries paddles in case both engines fail simultaneously. Dual outboards also permit using full power getting to and back from the fishing grounds in a hurry and trolling with one motor at reduced speeds. (3) Watertight compartments make the ski boat practically unsinkable and keep it from being swamped in a breaking sea. (4) Wide-beam design adds to stability on the water. For a sea-going boat, Sea King is surprisingly easy to build because there are few difficult joints, fewer places to leak and the plywood deck and planking covers the simple frames with a minimum of work. Bcst of all for fisherinen, the flat deck allows freedom of action that is commonly necessary in playing the big bill-fish that lurk in the ocean several miles offshore. While primarily designed for the ocean or gulf, "Sea King" makes an excellent fishing boat for the great lakes or any of the other inland lakes where the fishing is good. (The picture shows "Sea King" suspended from a unique overhead trailer designed for ease of launching).

12 pages, 3 plate(s)

$7.95
Maximus--Ski tower (Pub. No. 5068)

Outfitted with a 20-hp outboard, it will do 38 mph--perfect for towing water skiers.

No forms are required to build this zippy little wake-maker, just two saw horses to support the frame assemblies. Paper patterns can be dispensed with too (with the exception of sheer plates and stem) by drawing the framing outlines directly on the pieces to be cut.

4 pages, 3 plate(s)

$6.95
Blue Streak (Pub. No. 5069)

Prop riding on her hydro-conic bottom, Blue Streak takes Class “B” outboard motors for a merry spin in stock utility races. With a Mercury Hurricane motor, Blue Streak clocked 39 mph with one person aboard. With the same motor and a Quicksilver lower unit, she topped 46 mph. Johnson, Evinrude, Scott-Atwater, Martin, Champion and the other Class “B” (10 hp or motors of 20 cu. in piston displacement) motors are all adapted to this speedy runabout. On fast turns, upswept sides keep her plastered to the water surface.  Only two frames and a transom with plywood planking make Blue Streak easy to build and also easy on the money. Special designs have eliminated most of the difficult joinery, yet the stressed-skin plywood hull will take choppy water in stride and carry as many as three people.

8 pages, 2 plate(s)

$7.95
Stingaree--A speedy 14 ft Outboard (Pub. No. 5077)

by William D. Jackson

If you’re looking for something that’s flashy and fast in an outboard runabout, "Stingaree"  is the boat for you. You can build it yourself in 60 to 75 spare-time hours for about $75. Its clipped chine and tail-fin design makes it as modern in styling as today’s car. As for planing performance, at wide-open speeds you can see daylight under almost the entire length of the hull—it’s practically air borne—in fact a very small pocket handkerchief will adequately cover the planing area.

14 pages, 22 plate(s)

$9.95
Sea Babe--A Lightweight 15 ft Cabin Cruiser (Pub. No. 5078)

by William D. Jackson

Cruising comfort plus runabout speed are packed into 15-ft. "Sea Babe". For extended cruising along river and lake routes, winding through the many picturesque canal routes, or for short week-end hops that require frequent launching and beaching, you’ll find "Sea Babe" easy to handle and economical to run. With the motor removed, she weighs only 450 lbs., and her 15-ft. hull handles easily on a 2-wheel trailer. And performance! The light weight and the advanced design of the hull bottom practically eliminate power-wasting spray, and boost "Sea Babe’s" speed 2-5 mph over most outboard cruisers powered by identical motors. Trussed keel construction builds in strength without weight. She rides softly and without pounding. With motor attached, she floats in only 2 in. of water.  The low silhouette and sporty lines make you think "Sea Babe" is bigger than her 15-ft. length. In the 7-ft. cockpit, there’s plenty of room for fishing plus two chairs, one for the skipper. The simple framework and plywood planking make her easy to build, so let’s get started.

24 pages, 3 plate(s)

$9.95
Riviera--A 17 ft Inboard Runabout (Pub. No. 5079)

by William D. Jackson

You can do more than just wish that you had a sleek, powerful, mahogany-decked runabout like Riviera. By constructing it yourself you can turn out this eye-appealing 38-mph boat that will be the pride of the lake and a treat to ride in, yet spend only 1/5 the price of even modest boats of the same size and power. You can further fit Riviera to your pocketbook by bargain hunting and using just the amount of trim you wish. Although Riviera is up to date in design and is built to provide years of dependable service, the same construction techniques are used that have proven themselves over and over in home-builder boat projects.

24 pages, 7 plate(s)

$9.95
Serviceable Nancy Jane, The (Pub. No. 5082)

For all-around use, this trim 19-ft. inboard runabout is easily adapted to a converted auto engine.

by William D. Jackson

The "Nancy Jane" is an all purpose craft designed to fulfill a great variety of uses in one boat. With a length, beam, and depth generous enough to be usable anywhere, this seaworthy design provides a craft that may be equipped with a marine or converted auto engine from 15 to 100 hp for speedy, stable riding service on open or sheltered waters. For those to whom cruising is the ultimate relaxation "Jane" may be equipped with one of the trim cabin designs shown or utilized as a double cockpit runabout. However the basic design as indicated upon the plans is that of an open cockpit utility runabout which is not only easy to build, requiring the minimum of labor and materials, but for all around use such as fishing, hunting, surf board riding, and short pleasure trips this model would be difficult to surpass.

7 pages, 2 plate(s)

$7.95
Chum--Speedy Inboard Runabout (Pub. No. 5083)

This speedy inboard runabout is designed for a converted Jeep motor

by William D. Jackson

This convex bottom (hydroconic) runabout is 15½ ft. long with a beam of 6 ft. and a maximum draft of 20 in. You can use either a double cockpit or a single cockpit style for utility use. "Chum" was designed for use with a Marined Jeep Engine (such as the Lehman Econ-o-Power, which develops 60-hp at 3400 rpm and will propel "Chum" at over 30 mph). Any 25-100 hp similar engine may also be used to power "Chum", as long as the motor is of light weight, high-speed design.  Plywood of 3/8-in. thickness is used to cover this boat and, with the framework indicated, "Chum" will stand up indefinitely under all conditions of usage.

8 pages, 2 plate(s)

$7.95
Comet--A fast 16 ft Runabout, The (Pub. No. 5090)

The Comet has been designed to be used with the conventional outboard motor. It really does not matter what power plant you put in this trim little craft as all will work equally well. If you desire a boat to travel at moderate speed, a very inexpensive power plant can be used. If, however, you like to travel at 25 or even 35 miles per hour you will find equipment for the purpose comparatively inexpensive and within the reach of most everyone.  By variations in the deck arrangement, the hull can be made to accord with your probable passenger requirements or ideas of style.

11 pages, 3 plate(s)

$7.95
Striper--A Shoal-Draft Utility Boat (Pub. No. 5094)

by A. Mason, Naval Architect

LOA 15' 2", BEAM 5' 91/2", DRAUGHT 131/2".

"Striper" is a shoal-draft launch only 15 feet long that not only has all the safety and seaworthiness of a real fishing boat but also has all the beauty and roominess of a handsome utility runabout. It is nearer the ideal solution of the average small-boat owner than almost any other craft, being a boat your family or youngsters will be proud to use and one on which your friends will always be eager to join you in a fishing excursion. -The hull will permit you to get there in a hurry, yet with the small dependable Universal marine engine shown, she can troll all day long at greater economy and reliability than an equally powered outboard engine. Also, the hull form has been designed to be as nonpounding as possible yet allow maximum use of plywood for sturdiness and practically leakproof construction. Furthermore, "Striper" has a tunnel aft that, besides being slightly unusual in a small boat, allows a substantial saving in draft and much added protection to the propeller that will more than offset the slight loss in speed due to the added resistance of the tunnel and skeg. While a small amount of extra work is involved, the construction has been kept simple: all the sides are flat surfaces without any sharp corners to interfere with the maximum efficient flow of water to the propeller. To avoid any air pocket, the tunnel does not project above the water line.

12 pages, 4 plate(s)

$7.95
13 ft Outboard Runabout (Pub. No. 5102)

This 13-foot racing runabout answers the demand for a boat that can be raced successfully, yet has features of size, stability, riding comfort, and seaworthiness that make it ideal for general pleasure use. It meets all requirements of the runabout racing class, the rules of which prevent the entry of out-and-out racing boats.  The building of racing runabouts was pioneered several years ago on the Pacific Coast, and the new boat is the result of much experience in designing, racing, and manufacturing them. Several previous designs have set world’s records for runabout classes. The final result of countless refinements and changes. this new racing runabout will hold its own in the stiffest competition to be found anywhere in the country, yet it will carry a load well and ride smoothly. Beveled chines make the craft non-tripping, regardless how sharp a curve is attempted. Simplicity of construction has been stressed;- for instance, no rabbeting is necessary except in the stem.

12 pages, 6 plate(s)

$8.95
15 ft Inboard Motor Boat (Pub. No. 5108)

(60 Miles on a Gallon of Gas)

Setting a new high in economy of operation, this 15-foot boat is designed for fishing and any general use that requires a seaworthy, low-cost, practical inboard motor boat. The remarkable economy in fuel—60 miles to a gallon of gasoline or even more—is made possible through a special design that assures maximum efficiency from the air-cooled marine motors on the market.  Such inherently important factors as seaworthiness and shallow draft have in no way been sacrificed in obtaining this efficiency from the air-cooled marine the fact that an air-cooled motor is not subject to the corrosive action of salt water combine to make the boat ideal for salt-water use. Any desired trolling speed may be had.  The hull is of a simplified V-bottom type, as easy to build as a flat-bottom boat. There is no difficult bending, and most of the planks can be put on in straight pieces with little or no fitting. The small, light motor offers no installation problems. Marine plywood may be used instead of planking, if desired, eliminating the need of battens and substantially reducing the total weight.  The speed obtained with the 3/4-h.p. motor shown in the boat in the photograph was between 6 and 7 rn.p.h. This may be increased to as much as 10 m.p.h. by the use of a 4- or 5-h.p. motor.

16 pages, 2 plate(s)

$8.95
How to Build Mayfay (Pub. No. 5117)

by Weston Farmer

Mayfay is designed to do one thing and to do it well; to carry a large outboard, utilize its power efficiently, and to carry at least two people with abbreviated equipment on a cruise of short duration. She is 17 feet plus a few inches over all, by 5ft 6in beam, and has a depth varying from about 41/2 feet amidships to 21 inches at the stern. She will bunk two comfortably, and is best built in the simple raised deck style.

9 pages, 2 plate(s)

$7.95
Katusha--A Classic Inboard Cruiser/Runabout (Pub. No. 5118)

by Weston Farmer

Here’s another design by Weston Farmer who has turned out a most interesting little tabloid cabin cruiser complete with full size bunk, stove, sink and icebox. One of the most successful of these small boats is shown elsewhere in this book. You may also have heard of her before. Her name is "Mayfay". She is an improvement on an older boat which was designed some four or five years ago as a “pot boiler” and which, surprisingly, turned out to be one of the best boats I have ever designed. "Mayfay" ran so beautifully and performed so well that she is remarked by all hands along the waterfront where boatwise men congregate. "For a long time I have wanted to take that perfect planing little hull, enlarge it just as a tailor lets out a vest ever so little so that it is “jest right” for a little more bulk, and put midget apartment accommodations aboard her. And by golly I finally got around to it. The finished job methinks is a sweetheart. So here she is—and her name is Russian "Katusha", which means “Sweetheart” in the Czar’s tonguesky. Consider "Katusha": Her length is 19 feet, with an inch or two over. Her breadth is 6’7”. She will build in any average sized garage. Out of experience with previous tabloids I have come to the conclusion that there is no need denying the crew a real, full-sized bunk. So you’ll find "Katusha" equipped with one".

12 pages, 2 plate(s)

$7.95
Sez You! (Pub. No. 5119)

by Weston Farmer

The history of this design is an interesting one. Really, the hull of Sez You is an adaptation of a design for which Bruno Beckhard, the outboard motor maestro of Brooklyn, was responsible. Back in the days, not so very long ago either, when the outboard motor was a new and wonderful thing barely capable of making a hydroplane plane, Bruno started experimenting with flat bottom water wagons, v-bottom hydros, and heaven knows what not. Out of it all he evolved a boat which Jerry White, then editor of Rudder and now editor of Motor Boat, published as a how to build article. This original boat which was the combined efforts of White and Beckhard was called Nize Baby. She went like the deuce, and was the same dimensions over all as is Sez You here. But—and there’s the rub—the Sea Sled Company, zealous prosecutors of the patent rights of their company, claimed that the design was an infringement of the Sea Sled patents, and considerable annoyance was caused for all concerned. I reasoned to Clotilde, my pocket data book, that half of the Nize Baby designs remained at present unbuilt due to the misunderstanding caused by this controversy. Knowing that the secret of Nize Baby’s performance was not in the concaved sections but was rather in the longitudinal reverse curve to the bottom which was transversely as flat as a pancake aft of amidships anyway, I figured that a design could be calculated from the old Nize Baby idea which would fulfill the function of Nize Baby, and yet be just straight boat, with a flat bottom and no outside frills to tread on other people’s toes. Then every one could build one, and have sport for fair. So Sez You is the result. And to prove her, we built her and tested her out on the waters of Lake Minnetonka not so long ago. And does she go! Say, mister—like a hot penny on a greasy pan says me!

8 pages, 1 plate(s)

$7.95
Doane's 40-Mile Hydrobout (Pub. No. 5120)

Here are the lines, offsets and specifications for the famous Doane Hydrobout--a one-step uitility hydroplane runabout which has been highly developed by Art Doane.

The advent of the outboard hydroplane had both its good and bad consequences. On the good side it taught us that the placing of a step in a boat could and almost always would increase the speed if the boat was of the planing type. We learned where this step should be placed, and a lot of correlative features concerning steps. On the bad side were noted many spills and a gemeral “greased pig” behavior of hulls. Most of these handling difficulties have been attributed to their proper place: That is to the motor and the placement of weights in an outboard hull, but in some quarters the notion got around that the step caused the chine to dig and that step hulls weren’t as easy to handle or as stable as straight bottom planing boats. That notion is a lot of poppycock, fit to be classed with the mistaken notion that Hoover was the cause of the depression. With a properly designed step bottom the handling is no different from an ordinary runabout, and the speed is, of course, generally about ten miles an hour faster for a given power. The reason for this increase in speed is because the water breaks away from the hull, and air is admitted at a point where atmospheric pressure is beginning to turn into a vacuum tending to further load the boat, depress the stern, and slow her up. The step boat, properly designed, just as an airplane or a motor boat should be (with respect to planing areas, weights, etc.), is drier, softer riding, worlds faster, and as sweet handling as the old-fashioned straight bottom stuff.

12 pages, 2 plate(s)

$7.95
11 Ft 3 Inch Outboard (Pub. No. 5131)

Designed by Edwin Monk, Naval Architect

Here’s the answer for all ‘round boating—a trim little speedster that’s a fishing, family and sports boat. This neat 11-footer combines cartop weight with seaworthy stability usually found only in larger craft. Steps nimbly along equipped with a 5 or 10 hp outboard motor. Easy to launch, easy to maintain. Simple yet efficient design is made-to-order for the amateur to build at low cost with the perfect boat material, exterior fir plywood

12 pages, 6 plate(s)

$8.95
13 Ft. 4 Inch Outboard (Pub. No. 5132)

Designed by Edwin Monk, Naval Architect

A true sportsman’s boat with good looks and top performance—yet designed for the amateur builder working on a modest budget. May be built as a snappy runabout or modified to a general utility boat. Speeds to 35 mph with 5 to 25 hp motors. Generous freeboard provides extra safety and stability in rough water Plenty of comfort and leg room. Smooth-handling maneuverability makes it as popular in crowded waters as in large lakes.

12 pages, 7 plate(s)

$8.95
15-Ft. Outboard (Pub. No. 5135)

Designed by Frank E. Strickland, Naval Architect

A big, open-water boat that will stand the gaff for a lifetime of boating pleasure Takes a 25 hp motor with an ease that will put you at the front of the fleet. Sweeping lines, from clean-cut bow to beamy transom, indicate its exceptional seaworthiness. Ample room to stow all your gear for two weeks’ camping cruise—-and it has the strength and power to carry it gracefully. The average handyman can build this big, all-purpose beauty with little trouble

14 pages, 4 plate(s)

$8.95
16-Ft. Runabout (Pub. No. 5136)

Designed by David Beach, Naval Architect

This 16’ sportster with its racy, thoroughbred lines is designed for speed and power. Handles 50 hp motor for speeds to 30 mph, yet it can as well be used for trolling. On choppy waters or smooth, this happy craft has a measure of seaworthiness rarely found in outboards. Alternate arrangements permit construction of a rugged, safe boat for all purposes. Not too complex for the first-time boat builder with average woodworking ability . . . pure pleasure for the expert.

8 pages, 6 plate(s)

$7.95
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