Sail Boat Plans

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Build Your Own Fiberglass Sloop (Pub. No. 5470)

by Whittier, Robert J.

This boat utilizes a little-known method of fiberglass boat-building that does not require a mold.


12 pages, 3 plate(s)

$7.95
Aquasail--A 11.5 Ft. Day Sailor (Pub. No. 5471)

by Bob Whittier

This little daysailer with sail and jib is ideal for teaching the beginner the fine points of sailing.

One hesitates to use me word perfect in characterizing a boat—-first out of a natural modesty, second out of the knowledge that one man’s dreamboat is another man’s dog. But in the case of AquaSail, we feel compelled to say it’s perfect. Adapted from an old design, AquaSail floats with just the right jaunty, perky air. Her stability is right on the button with no crankiness to spoil her sunny disposition. And her response is superlative. In just a puff or two of wind she darts forward nicely. Designed first for those who have no experience in either building or handling a sailboat, AquaSail also can satisfy the experienced sailor and builder. Designed for two, she’s large enough to be out of the toy boat class. But with a length of 11½ ft. and a beam of 5 ft. she gives no trouble to the beginner learning to handle a sailboat. Her hull lines are simple and free of troublesome twists, a fact to be appreciated by the inexperienced builder. Yet theyre clean and smart enough not to cause her to bob and drift as some badly designed boats do

5 pages, 2 plate(s)

$6.95
Seafoam--A 16 foot LWL Catamaran (Pub. No. 5472)

by Charles Bell

Weight 700 lbs.; beam 8’; sail area 157 square feet.

Full-length sail battens, rotating, streamlined lightweight mast and a luff spar on the jib which permits reefing or furling the sail from the cockpit. Also features dagger centerboards and spring-loaded kick-up rudders. Seafoam is a sporty boat for those who like the kind of sailing that a sensitive cat of this size affords. It should be remembered, of course, that the so-called superior stability of sailing catamarans has been proven to be a myth. They can be upset and turned upside down in the water more easily than most supporters of catamarans will admit. And once upset, they are next to impossible to right in the water. With this element of danger in mind, Seafoam has safety flotation built into the center section and the hulls are left hollow. Essential safety requirements dictate that large deck plates be provided in each hull, so that in the event of an upset, one hull can be kept tight and the opposite hull can be flooded. When the flooded hull has sunk, the cat can be righted after disconnecting one stay. The flooded hull is pumped out, the mast reset, and the wetter and wiser crew then carries on. If you are a cat fan you know all of this and you will find that Seafoam is fast, maneuverable and quite dry—as cats go.

5 pages, 3 plate(s)

$6.95
Polaris--a 25' 6" Auxiliary Cruiser (Pub. No. 5486)

by S. S. Rabl

Polaris! Somehow or other that name creates visions of a rolling sea, a star above the horizon, a latitude shot. Polaris the north star has been a guiding point for mariners since the time when the first Viking long ship started its voyage across the western ocean. In Polaris, the cruiser, we guide the boatbuilder to the acme in a small auxiliary. Some sailboat men miss a lot of fun exploring shallow coves because their extreme draft does not allow them to enter. At the beginning it was decided to make this boat as shoal draft as possible and still keep her seaworthy, so a centerboard was used to secure the necessary lateral plane. High speed was desired on our craft and to this end her stern lines were flattened to keep her from squatting when a high-powered motor was installed. This to some extent hampers her good sailing qualities when heeled over because the transom corners drag in the water. For the real saiorman who will use only a small motor, we have made the after sections with two separate sets of offsets so that better sailing qualities may be obtained if high speed is not necessary. The fact that emergencies might demand that she be beached at times was the factor that decided on the full framed construction with all frames continuous around the hull.

13 pages, 3 plate(s)

$7.95
Spindrift--A 30 ft. Auxiliary Cruiser (Pub. No. 5487)

by J. A. Emmett

It’s as simple in construction as a rowboat—and this Chesapeake Bay design gives you comfort and seaworthiness that would be hard to duplicate.

Spindrift is a yacht modification of the skipjack type as built by a number of small boatyards on Chesapeake Bay. The photographs show several of these boats of about the same size, each differing somewhat as to details of rig, cabin, rail, and so forth but all having the same main characteristics-—shoal draft, roominess, and the deadrise type hull, invariably crossplanked on the bottom, which means cheap and comparatively easy construction. Two sail plans are shown—-cutter and ketch: the former will be found faster for afternoon sailing and racing, the latter handier for more serious cruising. Both have been drawn up with simplicity of gear in mind; many of the fittings being such that they can be made up of strap brass, or of black iron then sent away for galvanizing. It is not necessary to lay down the complete lines, but it would be well to make the full-sized backbone laydown, Fig. 2. A 32x6-ft. floor built of cheap T, & G. lumber over 2x4-in. supports will more than repay its cost; or an inside floor this size can be used and heavy building paper laid over it if lines cannot be drawn directly on the floor. The advantage of this mold loft work is that with the backbone thus drawn exactly to shape the actual members can be cut out to go together perfectly without tedious fitting

12 pages, 8 plate(s)

$8.95
Build Mercury--A Hudson River Iceboat (Pub. No. 5488)

by J. Julius Fanta

If you're looking for a thrilling iceboat design, you’ll like Mercury, the latest creation of the Hudson River type and a fast, trim racer with a moderate rig. This craft is a departure from the usual “banjo” cockpit model in that the crew sits upright and steers as in a car. A comfortable boat in heavy winds, Mercury is 20 feet long and carries 90 square feet of sail. No jib is necessary, as this sail has proved useless on iceboats. There are two cockpits, one located in front of the other. The T-angle iron runner blades prescribed are designed for sailing in snow as well as on clear ice. The laminated backbone construction, which is relatively simple, makes the hull extremely staunch and checkproof. Mercury is steered by remote control, with the steering quadrant coming back into the fore cockpit. Specifications given here provide not only for a weatherable craft but an attractive one.

8 pages, 4 plate(s)

$7.95
Build Ice-Sprite--A Four-Runner Ice Boat (Pub. No. 5489)

by J. Julius Fanta

The four-runner iceboat is here for those who demand the most up-to-date innovation in this thrilling sport. The four-runner “Ice-Sprite” design has several features embodying greater safety. With four-cornered support, it rears up and hikes less. Moreover, the hull and sail does not tip forward or backward, as do other types. Because the position of the sail is stationary, capsizing is less likely to occur. In straight going, the rear runners track in the cuts of the fore runners. Thus with two tracks instead of three, friction is reduced and more speed is possible. As it weighs only 210 pounds, it sails and rides easily with added comfort from two runner-planks. The cockpit is large enough to accommodate two or three persons. Ice-Sprite will not spin. Designed with even balance, it requires no anti-capsizing skids on the runnerplank ends. The hull is symmetrical so that it can be steered in front equally well by reversing the direction of the runners and stepping the mast reversed on the after deck. The sail area is only 75 square feet.

8 pages, 4 plate(s)

$7.95
Cappy--A 20' Cabin Sloop (Pub. No. 5490)

by J. Julius Fanta and Christ Sommer

Plans and details for Cappy are presented here for the man who has built his first boat and wants to gr aduate to a sportier and somewhat larger craft. However, this will not be too difficult a task for the novice toolsman, if special attention is given to all construction details. Cappy’s grace of line appeals to anyone with an eye for boats. With a well-designed Marconi rig, spreading 220 square feet of sail, this sloop is a noble sailer, capable of giving a good account of herself in rough weather. The rudder is underwater, permitting an outboard motor to be attached to the transom. For stability she has a 39” draft fin keel with an underslung 850-pound iron shoe. A foundry can turn out the casting at low cost and the amateur builder can install it without difficult operations. The six-foot beam provides safe footage on deck alongside the cabin trunk.

10 pages, 5 plate(s)

$7.95
Corky--A Sailing Speedster (Pub. No. 5491)

For a sailing speedster that’s comfortable, roomy and does well in rough weather, this centerboard sloop will fill the bill. Few craft of Corky’s size, 18 feet with a 77¾-inch beam, have fast qualities as well as large cockpit accommodations. Corky is an ideal project for the novice to build, because it entails no complications in construction. All details are designed to simplify and facilitate work. Corky is in a class by herself when it comes to smart sailing and handling. Her 175-square foot sail area in a tall rig accounts for fast going in moderate breezes. The spread is not excessive for stiffer winds. She has a clean transom, so outboard power may be used. Canvas-covered, the deck is of prestwood or plywood, which eliminates tedious planking. V-shaped coaming rails flare aft to keep the cockpit dry.

12 pages, 5 plate(s)

$8.95
Tiny Bear--A Junior Moth built of Plywood (Pub. No. 5495)

by J. Julius Fanta

Here is “Tiny Bear,” a junior Moth class scow-type sailboat that is about the easiest craft to build. Ten feet long and weighing only 70 pounds, it is as fast as it is small and light. It is intended for sailing by youngsters on protected waters, which are undisturbed by sizable waves. Grown-ups, too, will find equal enjoyment in sailing this craft, as there is ample room for two in the cockpit. So simple is the construction that “Tiny Bear” can be built in two or three days with no special tools. The construction is surprisingly simplified and expedited by planking the entire hull with ¼” plywood or Prestwood. The tedious job of fitting narrow planks is alien to this project. Good news is the fact that only one frame is necessary to mould the hull. Making this single mould frame is the logical beginning when building. Use ¾” by 4” rough pine for the frame and size it according to the accompanying sketch. White pine of ¾” stock is suitable for making the transom and bow plate. 8pp., 5 plates.

8 pages, 4 plate(s)

$7.95
Petrel-- A 16' Plywood Sloop (Pub. No. 5514)

by William D. Jackson, N.A.

"Petrel" is a sailboat that fulfills the greatest possible variety  of uses in one model, offering the builder either an open-cockpit racing craft with comfortable accommodations for day sailing or a snug cabin model with accommodations for overnight trips to distant points. Either model is constructed from the same basic design, and either model possesses unusual seaworthiness, stability, trim attractive lines, speed, and ability to handle well on all points of sailing. Marine plywood is used to plank, or more rightly, to cover this paragon of small sailers, offering lightweight, speedy and able performance, and permanent leakproof qualities, not to mention a minimum of labor and expense in construction. The construction of the two models—open cockpit or cabin—is identical up to a certain point. Due to the simplified construction, ordinary carpenter’s tools and only average skill are required to build the boat.

16 pages, 6 plate(s)

$8.95
Gypsy--A 24' Motor Sailer (Pub. No. 5522)

by William D. Jackson, N.A.

"Gypsy" is a proven motor sailer that will outweather the best of the ordinary large or small cruisers. The original design was sailed some 6000 miles in all kinds of weather under all manner of conditions, and been out hundreds of miles from the coast line on the Gulf of Mexico and weathered blows that caused quite large boats to seek shelter. Over a period of six years the original design was tested and improvements made to make this sailer smarter and even more seaworthy. All of the good points of the original design were retained and everything that was learned and tabulated during its period of usage that would make operation and performance better was applied to this new and improved design.

12 pages, 5 plate(s)

$8.95
Dart--A Fast 13' Daysailer (Pub. No. 5525)

Sailing is a word to conjure with. Its adherents range from owners of little gnatsize craft to those of huge schooners. Nowhere on the water is a greater variety of action or repose to be had than in sailing. It ranges from merely moving lazily in light breezes to bowling along with the wind whistling through the rigging and lee rails awash, giving action and thrills akin to flying. “Dart” Is a small two or three person sailing craft, designed for use on protected waters such as bays,  lakes, rivers or wherever sheltered waters are found. Its construction will repay the builder handsomely and provide a fast sailing craft, light in weight, easily transportable and cheap to construct with all difficult. joinery eliminated. It provides thrilling and economical sport.

12 pages, 3 plate(s)

$7.95
Wings--A 13' Sailing Scow (Pub. No. 5526)

Extremely fast, safe, and able on smooth water, the scow or skimming type of sailboat is perhaps the most efficient hull form known, and one readily adaptable to home construction. The 13-foot skimmer “Wings” described and pictured here, is a true scow sailing craft. It has shown an excellent turn of speed, the ability to point closely, and is easily handled with one finger on the tiller. It is especially adapted to sailing wherever sheltered waters abound. Designed to build easily, difficult joinery work has been eliminated. Anyone with the aid of ordinary carpenter’s tools and a few clamps can build this sailboat and it will furnish incomparable sport and compare favorably with other fast hulls.

16 pages, 2 plate(s)

$8.95
12 ft Sailing Skiff (Pub. No. 5531)

A few weeks before the opening of lake and seashore navigation is a good time to decide on the type of craft you will want to use for the season’s cruising.  For the amount of labor and expense involved, few other boats afford as much genuine satisfaction as this 12-ft. sailing skiff, which was completed during vacation at the beach at an outlay of about $25 for materials. Practically every part was made with ordinary tools and the limited facilities of a shore resort. It can easily be duplicated by anyone who has had average experience with tools by following the accompanying diagram

12 pages, 3 plate(s)

$7.95
Chum--A 12' Lapstrake Daysailer (Pub. No. 5533)

Twelve feet of sailing boat—and how she can sail! If you’re looking for a small boat to bang about in, something that will scoot along under the slightest breeze, a craft that will give you sailing, with all the flavor of keen sport together with a fair element of safety—then, build “Chum.” “Chum” is of lap strake construction instead of batten seam, that is, each plank is lapped over the one below it at the seam instead of butting together backed with a batten as described in ‘Roamer,’’ “Flash,” “Crack” and some other boats in this list. A real classic "looker."

28 pages, 1 plate(s)

$9.95
Flying Proa, The (Pub. No. 5540)

Strictly speaking, a sail-boat is a craft propelled by any sort or number of sails. Usually, however, the term sail-boat is restricted to an open pleasure-boat carrying a single sail, and rigged after the fashion called, for some inscrutable reason, the cat rig. When a pleasure-boat is large enough to have a cabin or carries a jib and mainsail, she is usually honored with the name of yacht, and is thus promoted above the rank of sail-boat. . . . The cat-boat is, then, always dangerous when in careless or incompetent hands, and sometimes unavoidably dangerous when managed by the best of sailors.  It is, however, the best and safest sail-boat which civilized boat-builders have produced, and we can not expect any thing safer from them. . . Nevertheless such a boat can be built, and with it two cool-headed girls can outsail the "Sappho" or the "Columbia" without risking any danger more serious than that of an occasional sprinkling of spray.  . . .The Feejee double canoe is not, however, the consummate flower of barbarian boat-building genius. It has been surpassed by the flying proa of the Ladrone Islands--a craft that combines to some extent both the hollow and the solid log ideas, and which merits a brief description here.

16 pages

$7.95
Build a New England Sailing Dory (Pub. No. 5592)

"FLIGHT" is a speedy outboard runabout cruiser whose construction is brought within the scope of the amateur builder by the simple application of marine plywood planking. The benefits of plywood make this cruiser sturdy and useful for rugged cruising, fishing, inland commuting or as a workboat.  Flight is 19’ 6” long, with a 66” beam and very slight hull draft. The cockpit aft is amply large and roomy for fishing activities as well as for several folding-type deck chairs. Additional room inboard is the result of having the motor outboard. A Four-cylinder Elto Quad will drive Flight at a cruising speed of 25-30 miles an hour. A less expensive two-cylinder outboard is perfectly adaptable to Flight to acquire 15-20 miles an hour speeds.

6 pages, 5 plate(s)

$7.95
Coot a 22 ft Sharpie (Pub. No. 5594)

by J. Emmett

"Coot" is meant to be old-fashioned looking: her Bugeye rig with masts sharply raked, the deadeyes and lanyards, the trail boards forward and the rodded windows of her house all combine to give a boat that’s different—one which will attract attention in any anchorage. Her hull is as easily built as the average large flat-bottomed skiff. Plywood used for cabin or hull simplifies building and keeps weight down, and the rig is not only efficient for the type, and fast, but cheap and easy to install. The result is a boat which will go anywhere there is water to float the average outboard driven craft, yet one which will be perfectly seaworthy in really rough going.  The cabin has berths for two at night, settees with sitting-up headroom daytimes, and cooking and hanging space. Outside there is a separate cockpit for whoever is handling the tiller; another for the rest of the party. Here is a graceful, shoal draft, simply constructed cruising auxiliary for two, of the famous Chesapeake Bay sharpie design.

12 pages, 6 plate(s)

$8.95
Snorky a 14 ft Cat-Rigged Scow (Pub. No. 5595)

In "Snorky" we are offering one of the simplest of sailing boats. She is very easy to build and will hold her own in speed along with boats having much more complicated hulls. The tools necessary to build this boat are few. The usual tools found around the house will suffice. A saw, plane, hammer, and screw driver makes a complete outfit.

8 pages, 4 plate(s)

$7.95
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