Small Craft Plans

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Whizzer--A Hydroglider (Pub. No. 5122)

by Weston Farmer

At last! Here’s the long looked for air-drive speeder which our shoal draft boat bugs have been looking for. Souped-up motorcycle conversions will furnish good speeds if weight is watched.

There are two things which remained unanswered in the general lexicon of published wisdom on things boatwise. One unanswered question is, will a converted motorcycle or auto engine drive a boat with an air prop?” The second unanswered question is “How can I get reasonable speed on a boat that will float on a morning dew?” Whizzer is the answer to all of this. She’s little, and light, and easy to build in the bargain. And inexpensive. Further, she will go reasonably fast with a light converted motorcycle engine which has enough intestines to produce 25 h. p. on a weight of around 85 lbs. About 22-23 m.p.h. And she draws as little water as is reasonable. I’d like to leave that rudder off, so that there would be nothing on the bottom but paint, but I can’t perpetrate anything on the public that won’t work, so I’m telling you that air rudders are lousy-—a bane on the stern end, if you get what I mean. Not only are they affected by every cross wind that blows, but they haven’t any turning power at low speeds. On airplanes they are 0. K. as there is enough wind to make them effective. On a boat to do the same work they have to be as big as a barn. So water rudder we have, with its effectiveness and draft.

4 pages, 2 plate(s)

$6.95
Sea Skeeter--An Ideal Boat for Young Mariners (Pub. No. 5125)

This unique craft is designed for the young skipper who has had no previous experience in marine construction, and who wants an inexpensive, light boat in which to learn the A-B-C’s of navigation. By using a single sheet of galvanized iron for the entire bottom the job of caulking is practically eliminated, for the joint between bottom and side-members is made water-tight when assembled by means of a strip of cloth soaked in white lead. Also, the builder need not worry over a centerboard-well because the centerboard is hinged to the bottom and no opening is required. The mast together with sail and boom can be lifted out of the step instantly and stowed, the only rigging being a single main sheet. Steering is with a paddle which comes in handy during a calm.

4 pages, 1 plate(s)

$6.95
How to Build a Kyack (Pub. No. 5128)

by Sam Rabl

Spring time and reminiscences—dreams of years ago and of how as a pair of high school kids we built our first boat. No glorious Spanish argosy looked half so wonderful to our eyes as did that little hooker built over a frame of barrel hoops and strips of cull lumber secured from a nearby box factory. The covering was the unique part of the job. Somewhere we had seen the plans of a boat built from paper and as we could not afford canvas to cover our frame, we covered it with many layers of newspaper. Each layer was pasted to the one beneath it with a mixture of tar filched from a nearby tar barrel and rosin secured from the scrapings of whisky barrels stored behind a neighboring distillery. With fingers blistered from the molten mixture we proud1y launched our creation and much to the surprise of bystanders and ourselves it floated. We used this craft for two seasons. Our next creation was a pair of twin kyacks, this time covered with brown wrapping paper, each layer set down with varnish. A canvas deck kept out the water and for five years we cruised these little hookers into the far reaches of our beloved home waters in Chesapeake Bay. To those to whom a canoe only means a party on the quiet waters of an inland stream the little boat described in this article will have no appeal, but to the man who likes his cruising on rough water and does not want to wait for his weather the kyack will find its greatest appeal.

6 pages, 2 plate(s)

$6.95
Shingle--An Auto Campers Boat (Pub. No. 5129)

by Arthur C. Klust and Ray F. Kuns

"Shingle” is a light but sturdy little rowboat which can be carried on top of the car on the hunting or fishing trip. The plans given here also show how to adapt the boat for use with an outboard motor.

The neat little tub shown in the photos was designed and built by Ray F. Kuns, an amateur at boat-building, but a veteran sportsman who has felt the need of a companionable small boat to carry along on his wanderings in the wildernesses. The marvelous success of the “Shingle” design is without doubt due to the fact that her builder worked with the idea of efficiency superseding elegance or beauty of line. The completed boat, as built by Mr. Kuns, weighs somewhat under one hundred pounds, and is easily carried on top of a car. She rides nicely, and two men find no difficulty in loading or launching her from this position. If she is hauled on a small trailer, one fellow can handle her alone. According to her designer,“Shingle” fairly eats rough water.

12 pages, 2 plate(s)

$7.95
Guppy--A 5-ft Sailor (Pub. No. 5130)

Designed by John Burroughs

Here’s five feet of fun for the whole family. It’s a youngster’s sailboat that Dad can build in a week end with two panels of fir plywood and help from the kids. This pudgy little five-footer is an ideal boat to teach the children how to sail in a swimming pool or a lake. Its sturdy construction will take a beating from active pint-size sailors, yet it is so light that they can carry it around. Smaller than the real thing but bigger than a toy, the five-footer will make a hit with all miniature mariners.

8 pages, 3 plate(s)

$7.95
13 Ft. 9 Inch Punt (Pub. No. 5133)

Designed by Frank E. Strickland, Naval Architect

This roomy fishing and duck boat has the flat-bottom stability needed for casting and shooting. Easy to handle with oars, it skims along spryly with a light outboard motor. Shallow draft makes it the ideal swamp boat--lets you get in where the big ones bite. Plenty, of working room for fishing or hunting partner, fishing gear, decoys. Simple to build with rugged exterior fir plywood.

7 pages, 5 plate(s)

$7.95
Plyak (Pub. No. 5141)

by David Jordan
Plan revisions by Edwin Monk

Here is an excellent plan for an 11ft. 3 in. plywood-skinned kayak

To the eskimo, a kayak is more than a boat. To him it’s more like an essential garment. When he’s laced into his whale bone and walrus-hide craft, he’s ready for anything in the way of weather, water or what-have-you. To most of us, however, a kayak is for venturing. It’s perfect for poking around uninhabited islands, exploring the bends of a lazy, winding river or just breaking the peaceful surface of a placid lake at sunset. Since whale bone and walrus-hide are rather hard to come by, this "Plyak” has been designed to give the pleasure of a kayak in a boat made from readily available materials. For anyone who has built a boat before, the Plyak should take about 40 man hours to complete. When launched, the Plyak will be an excellent “one-man” boat with possibly one child to “crew.”

6 pages, 2 plate(s)

$6.95
Alert (Pub. No. 5144)

by Hal Kelly

This row-or-go plan features self-bailing bait bin for fishing forays.

No problem in building the "Alert". This 12-ft. pram is designed as the ideal two-man fishing boat, although she will safely carry six people. The front and rear seats cover watertight compartments for dry storage use. Under the center seat are two bait wells, which may be used to keep your catch in as well as the bait. They are self bailing, if you wish to drain out the water on the way back, lightening the load considerably. She is designed to get the most out of a small outboard, 5 to 10 H.P. motors being ideal. The original used a Mercury Mark 200 which is a little more power than one would need and snapped her along at over 30 M.P.H. She handles very easy with a pair of oars, sliding over the water quietly and easily. With her flat bottom she is almost tip proof, the perfect boat to cast from.

8 pages, 2 plate(s)

$7.95
Thing, The (Pub. No. 5151)

If you’re in or on the water near Marathon, Florida, and happen to spot what appears to be a sea monster bearing down, don’t die of heart failure—it’s probably nothing more than Al Bayles’ "Thing". All who see it say it’s the darndest boat ever built, but they have to admit it performs. "The Thing" has great maneuverability and literally flies across the surface. Under full power of a 10-hp motor, little more than the prop and the keel remain in the water. And 10 hp is all that Al recommends—any more and "The Thing" assumes control!

4 pages, 2 plate(s)

$6.95
Shoveller (Pub. No. 5154)

by Robert M. Steward

This 13-foot 8-inch duck boat is perfect for the man who is both hunter and amateur boat builder.

Here is a duck boat,that is reasonably easy to build. The frames are made from the full-size sections developed affer the fore and aft lines have been laid down. The planking and decking thicknesses, 1/2 inch on the sides and 1/4 inch elsewhere, must be deducted from the sections in order to have the frames of correct size, because the lines for small boats are drawn to the outside of the planking. Bevels on the side and bottom frames are picked up from full-size lines and sawed or planed on the frame material edges. To keep weight at a minimum the frames, cockpit sides, the side frame and deck beam have been simply designed, each to be cut from a single piece. Intermediate bottom frames, between regular frames to support the floor boards, can be fitted after the bottom is planked.

4 pages, 1 plate(s)

$6.95
Pod (Pub. No. 5159)

by Gordon L. Hansen

This beautiful 15-foot rowing dory slips through the water, lets the fish-hungry angler sneak up on those big ones.

This dory is a natural for the man who likes a bit of exercise and appreciates the simplicity and silence of a well-designed rowboat. A narrow bottom, tapered at both ends, enables her to slice through the water with a minimum of effort and flaring sides make her safe and dry in a chop. "Pod", with a beam of 52 inches, has an overall length of 15 feet, 5 inches and is 11 feet, 6 inches on the waterline. Three pieces of marine plywood make up the sides and bottom and no frames are required. This makes boatbuilding about as simple as it ever gets and the result is a light, clean hull with fewer places for rot to develop. However, for those who feel better with conventional framing, optional frames are included in the drawings.

10 pages, 2 plate(s)

$7.95
Seal (Pub. No. 5162)

There’s adventure in every inch of this 16-foot Eskimo kayak.

Here are the luilding plans for a kayak based on the general lines of the canoes used by the Eskimos. "Seal" is essentially a one-man boat but she may be made longer and the cockpit lengthened out a little so that two persons may be accommodated. This may be accomplished by respacing the frames about three or four inches farther apart than shown.

6 pages, 2 plate(s)

$6.95
Widgett (Pub. No. 5186)

by William D. Jackson, Naval Architect.

Try this beamy utility boat. You’ll like its simplified construction

Building "Widgett" requires only ordinary tools and no steam bending. It may be built in a fraction of the time required for ordinary utility boats. It is beamy and stable on any waters anywhere and, despite its simplified construction, is immensely strong, and durable enough to give you real service. Everything about "Widgett" has been planned so that it can be built in quantity, quickly and cheaply, either for livery service or by boat builders who wish to earn a reasonable profit with a first rate design. However, if your intentions are to build just one boat for personal use, this boat will out-perform most any ordinary boat of its clhss sold on the market today.

6 pages, 1 plate(s)

$6.95
Rapid Robert (Pub. No. 5189)

by Thomas B. Riley

"Rapid Robert" is a type known as a MacKenzie River boat, designed for those wild rivers with fast, rough currents. It is a raked, smooth-bottomed, sturdy rowboat, able to twist and turn on a dime, with a high, buoyant stern that will shoot through rapids which would sink the best of other craft. In fact, you are safer in rapids with "Rapid Robert" than you are in a canoe. This boat also performs satisfactorily as an ordinary rowboat, and, for cruising on more gentle waters, a removable section of the high transom may be slipped out to attach a 1 to 9 hp. outboard motor. You need no forms or molds for this boat. Planking and frames are simply cut, beveled, and assembled, thus giving the correct shape and form. Construction is of waterproof marine plywood; the 14 ft. length sheet is correct for this hull. No nails are used anywhere and all screws should have lead holes drilled before fastening.

12 pages, 1 plate(s)

$7.95
Canvas Kayak (Pub. No. 5191)

by Hi Sibley

This 10-footer not only has Vee-bottorn stability, but also a wider-than average beam.

While this 10-foot kayak is designed primarily for the 6-to-12-year-olds it can be built to accommodate an adult by increasing the distances between the frames and using heavier battens, but retaining the same beam. It is by no means a toy; its construction follows accepted practic

4 pages, 2 plate(s)

$6.95
Fold-Tite--A Portable Duck Boat (Pub. No. 5205)

by Weston Farmer

LOA 11' 0", BEAM 3' 6", WEIGHT 45 LBS, DRAUGHT 141/2".

"Fold-Tight" is presented in answer to numerous requests for a portable boat that could be carried right on a car. It is an excellent little job for duck hunters and can be strapped to the side or roof of an automobile. Because of its simplicity, it is less difficult to build than most boats. The parts lend themselves to easy home fabrication. The hull itself is just a heavy canvas bag, boat-shaped, that your local awning maker will sew up for you at moderate cost. If money is of prime importance, you could even do the canvas work yourself. Once you have built "Fold-Tight", you can collapse it, load it aboard your car, and take off for your favorite hunting spot. There the boat can be set up quickly for a day’s sport afloat.

8 pages, 2 plate(s)

$7.95
Midge--A 7.5-Ft. Roped Dinghy (Pub. No. 5209)

by Sam Rabl

Any of the boats in this book are big enough to sport a tender of the type described here, and if they are anchored off shore this sort of boat is almost indispensable. It is of the simplest design possible, yet is very seaworthy and will carry three full grown persons if called upon to do so. The little tub will tow on any length of rope, is light enough to be taken aboard by one man—-on one occasion when almost swamped by a terrific rain "Midge" was emptied entirely of water from the stern of the parent boat. It will row with the greatest of ease and can turn on the proverbial dime, and its roped sheer will keep it from marring the high finish of any yacht’s topsides. The construction is the acme of simplicity. No frames are required, the seat acting as a brace amidship, and the two ends frame the rest of the boat. Two simple moulds are made as shown on the plans, and the bow and stern are made from any stock boards available.

8 pages, 2 plate(s)

$7.95
Honker--An Outboard Motor Hunting Skiff (Pub. No. 5214)

by J.J. Fanta

Here is a highly serviceable hunting and fishing skiff whose outstanding feature is solid construction, with building simplified. Another feature is the transom projecting above the deck for attaching an outboard motor. The transom is high enough so that the motor may swing un hizh to clear weeds. etc.

11 pages, 2 plate(s)

$7.95
Parosa--A 16-Ft. Plywood Kynoe (Pub. No. 5217)

by Sam Rabl

Every other boat in this book was designed with the thought in mind that its crew would probably be of the masculine gender, but this one had its beginning in a strictly feminine set of requirements. Three girls wanted a boat; their reasons were widely divergent, as would be expected. One wanted a boat that could be rowed so that she could reduce some of her excess avoirdupois. The other, so that she could paddle up the creek among the lily pads where romance seemed to abound. The third, a tomboy, wanted the thrill of sailing her own ship in a spanking breeze. As if these requirements were not enough to roll together into one boat, in addition it had to be light enough to handle by themselves in and out of the water, and with enough beam to be safe under a small amount of sail. The result was a cross between a kyack and a canoe and the word kynoe was coined to describe the hybrid. Waterproof plywood was the answer to the weight problem and made the boat so light that one girl alone could pull it up on the beach and two could carry it. The beam is generous enough to work a pair of oars and still not too wide to paddle. The addition of a small dagger board solves the problem of securing enough lateral resistance to sail, and in every part the construction has been simplified.

4 pages, 3 plate(s)

$6.95
Hot Foot--A Speedy Outboard V-Bottom Pram (Pub. No. 5225)

by Luther H. Tarbox, Naval Architect

For the chap who desires to build a high-performance, V-bottom outboard having nearly the simplicity of construction of a flat-bottom boat, "Hot Foot" will prove to be just what the doctor ordered. She will plan with moderate power, yet she is rugged enough to take a 25-hp motor. Powered with a hot motor, she could give some of the service outboard racing runabouts a run for their money. While she won't pound too much and will be reasonably dry in choppy water, she was not designed for open-water use. The construction of Hot Foot is fairly rugged. No attempt has been made to secure light weight at the expense of adequate hull strength, so she can be depended upon to give years of satisfaction. This cannot be said of many designs of her type and intended service. She can be planked with either waterproof plywood or conventional wood.

12 pages, 4 plate(s)

$7.95
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