Small Craft Plans

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Motor Canoe, A (Pub. No. 5465)

by M.E. Daniels

This 16-ft. motor canoe can do everything an ordinary canoe can do and a lot more. You can paddle it, row it or sail it--but the real fun comes in powering it with the smallest kicker you can buy anc cruising all day on a gallon of gas. If you're the outdoor type, and not too much taller than 6 ft., you can also sleep aboard. The amble beam, flat bottom and hard chines give her a tip resistance that's hard to belive, and added buoyancy can be gained with the installation of optional sytrofoam stabilizng fins.

6 pages, 2 plate(s)

$6.95
8 foot Sailing Pram (Pub. No. 5467)

by Jack Payne

This little boat is easy to handle and safe for kids of all ages

This little 8-ft. sailboat is designed to be built of easily obtainable materials with minimum woodworking skills and simple  hand operated power tools. The gaff-rig was used to make the sail easy to cut and sew on a home machine. Total materials for the boat we bbuilt including sails, hardware, fiberglass, resin and paint—came to less than $99. Construction time for two men was aapproximately24 hours, but this does not include time spent getting the tools out, coffee breaks, standing back and looking and clean-up. Exterior A.C-grade plywood was used for all parts including ddagger board and rudder. Clear white pine was used for everything else. Other woods can be used if you wish (marine plywood, sspruce white oak, fir chines and clamps, redwood, spruce or 2-ft-diameter aluminum tube for the mast, mahogany for rudder and ddagger board but they will bring the cost up.

4 pages, 2 plate(s)

$6.95
Aquapram--A simple little 8 ft. utility pram (Pub. No. 5473)

by Hal Kelly

A useful little boat that can be built in a single weekend and will give many hours of fun for the family
.

With cars, there’s a concept known as the BTV—the basic transportation vehicle. It’s a fairly self-explanatory idea. All you want is to go from here to there and back, usually not too far, not too expensively and at a pretty low initial cost. We’ve never heard of this concept transferred on a one-to-one basis to boating, but if it were, we’ve got one of the ones. We call her AquaPram and she’s basic transportation on the water. Eight ft. long and 5 ft. 4 in. wide, AquaPram weighs in at a hair over 100 lbs., which makes her just right for cartopping. This means you have no trouble getting her to the water in the first place.     And once there, her virtues begin to show. You can row her. You can put up to a 5-hp motor on her. You can even set her up to take asmall sail if you want. She’s excellent as a tender to a larger boat. Her stability is beyond compare, so there’s no problem of tippiness going from one craft to another. This stability also makes her an excellent swimmer’s or diver’s boat, since she’s almost impossible to turn over crawling in and out of. In fact, as a test, we put four people on her gunwale and she didn’t even ship water. She’s also good as a utility pram for outdoorsmen who might want to use her to shoot or fish from. With her 4-in, draft, she’ll go over all but the shallowest shallows, and is easily pulled up on any beach. She’ll take two men with all their fishing gear and still have room for lunch and beer. But in addition, she has a hidden virtue. She’s unsinkable. AquaPram has her outside sections filled with foam molded in place. Again, as a test, we put three people in her and pulled the plugs. She never even filled to the seats. Not built for speed but for safety and utility, she still hits 7 mph pushed by the 3.6 and carrying three people.

5 pages, 1 plate(s)

$6.95
Build this Plywood Kayak (Pub. No. 5477)

by George Emory

You'll like the simple construction of this tough little lightweight. Fun to paddle or sail, it's designed to be steered by a novel kick-up rudder you control with foot pedals.

Unlike most kayaks, this easy-to-build plywood design has a generous beam and a perfectly flat bottom from stem to stern, both of which increase the stability. Even more novel, though, is the way it’s put together. There’s no tricky toolwork involved. The sides and bottom are 1/4-in. plywood with uncomplicated 90° chines and simple fore-and-aft curves. To keep the weight down, 1/4-in, plywood is also used for the frames, making it necessary to add stiffening cleats to the edges to give them more rigidity and provide the required surface area for mounting the planking. From the sheer down, it’s an ultrasimple plywood hull. For the deck, however, you switch to fiberglass, stretching 71/2-oz. glass cloth over the tops of the frames and saturating it with resin, then feathering the joint where the cloth laps the side planking.

6 pages, 2 plate(s)

$6.95
Build this White-Water Riverboat (Pub. No. 5480)

by Clinton R. Hull

It’s a rugged, beefy craft designed to take the wildest rapids in stride, but tame ehough to slip quietly into any shallow fishing inlet under oars
.

It's a real thoroughbred, this high-riding river sled. Evolved over a lifetime of white-water experience by famed riverman Glen Wooldridge, it features a fast-rising bow which lifts easily over the largest riffles. This, combined with steeply flaring sides and a long flat after section, gives the boat tremendous lift, excellent maneuverability and unbelievably shallow draft. Glen’s typical power rig is a mid-range outboard equipped with one of those husky jet-drive lower units. Such a setup gives the boat maximum shallow-water capability. I’ve been aboard when he’s skimmed over 4in.-deep riffles without touching bottom. Best of all, it’s very easily built and performs well with any outboard motor.

5 pages, 2 plate(s)

$6.95
Teacup--A Basic-Basic Sailboat (Pub. No. 5483)

by M.M. Matthews

Only 91/2 feet long, this salty little pram is small enough for a 10-year old to handle easily, large enough for dad to enjoy. And it's an easy project even for the first-time boat builder.

Teacup is a design that gets right down to the basics. With almost 5 fet of beam, it's a stable sturdy craft that handles nicely, an ideal learner's boat. While not a hot boat, by any means, Teacup's performance has enough sparkle to make this a fun little day sailer for anyone. Construction is a blend of economy and simplicity. To simplify the two most difficult parts of hull building, Teacup has a pram nose instead of a curved bow and a dagger centerboard rather than the more complicated swing-up board. Even the sail plan is simple. If you've never tried your hand at boat building, Teacup is a perfect choice as a first project. Dimensions were planned to utilize 10-ft. sheets of plywood, available on special order from your lumber dealer. Naturally, 8-ft. sheets may also be used, but this will require butt joints in the planking.

15 pages, 5 plate(s)

$8.95
Build this 14-foot Canoe for Little Money (Pub. No. 5484)

by Roy W. Beeching, Jr.

Of the numerous techniques I know for building a canoe, the one described here is by far the easiest. Two f'rinstances: the canoe has no ribs, and no steam-bending is required. Its principal ingreadient is 1/8-in. marine plywood--two 4x8-ft. panels sawed in half lengthwise. Gunwales, keelson, thwarts and breasthooks are stock lumber (fir or pine.) On completing it you will have a fast, stable, lightweight canoe--perfect for two, perfect for lake or river, and perfect for camping trips.

6 pages, 1 plate(s)

$6.95
Little Giant--A 9 foot Portable Pram (Pub. No. 5493)

by J.B. Temple

Combining the light-weight qualities of a small boat, and the strength of a larger boat, Little Giant was designed to meet exacting specifications. It is small enough to be transported on the top of a car, light enough so that two men can carry it over rough portages, sturdy enough to tow heavy loads safely, and strong enough to bounce off hidden snags. In general Little Giant is nine feet two and a quarter inches long and will rest with ease on a car top. It has a stubby bow which gives the seaworthieness of a boat several feet longer. When properly loaded, its modified vee bottom rises up on the waves like a duck and it will not dunk its nose or push water ahead of it. It has a wide beam of forty-six inches and the splay on the sides makes it seaworthy and comparatively dry in rough waters. It is a wonder with an outboard motor, as the shape of the bottom gives it a tendency to plane and hold its head up even at slow speeds. This boat is very easy and economical to build. The dimensions and bevels given in the accompanying plans are accurate as they have been checked and double checked from finished boats. Therefore, it is not necessary that you go through that bug-bear of boat construction in making full size layouts. If you can work accurately and frame to the dimensions and angles given, the parts will fit.

8 pages, 3 plate(s)

$7.95
Rob Roy Canoe--How to Build It, The (Pub. No. 5494)

by Adrien Niesen

(Excerpted from Practical Boat Building for Amateurs)

From the opening paragraphs. "In this chapter it is proposed to show how to build a Rob Roy canoe, giving its dimensions and mentioning its peculiarities.  Every one knows that a canoe is only a modified boat reduced to its smallest dimension, and it is, in fact, very much the same as the skiff just described to build, with the exception that it requires much more careful work, because, as it is small, the parts will not stand the same "dodging" in the event of an error being made. There are many kinds of canoes made, though they are all on the same principle; some of them are intended for sailing purposes, and are, therefore, made so large, and have such a weight of ballast, that they are really boats in every respect, retaining a sort of fancied resemblance to the justly celebrated Rob Roy. The beauty of a canoe is its extreme simplicity and yet efficiency, so that when a great complexity is produced with sliding keels, topmasts, rudders, mizenmasts, etc., all the quality of this kind of boat disappears.  Besides which, the portability of a canoe is, or should be, a leading feature, and not in any way to be despised. Of the different kinds of canoes that have been brought out since the introduction of the Rob Roy, none have really surpassed it for general travel, though in special descriptions of travel there are some which are superior.  For instance, the bluff lines of a Rob Roy make it a rather heavy craft to paddle against the current of a fairly swift stream, and so here a Ringleader has advantages; but the Ringleader is not nearly so handy as the Rob Roy on account of its great length-viz., 17 ft. 6 in., and some have been made as long as 22 ft.  For this reason it is not nearly so quickly turned, but it was claimed to stand rough water better, which, however, has never been really proved.  The Nautilus, which is the other variety which is most adopted, is a decided improvement on the Ringleader, standing very rough water much better and is far more manageable, but it has the same disadvantage as the Rob Roy in being heavier to paddle.  All these varieties have, in their turn, given birth to many others, and there are at least eleven distinct varieties of the original canoe, besides a great number of nondescript arrangements, used for fast cr peculiar work, as racing and sporting.  In a manual like this, where only a few pages can be devoted to one particular craft, it would be impossible to describe all the varieties; but for general work an ordinary Rob Roy is best."

12 pages

$7.95
Junior-- An All Purpose Dinghy (Pub. No. 5513)

by William D. Jackson, N.A.

Junior is a type of boat usually known as a yacht dinghy, but there the comparison ends. Yacht dinghys are notoriously cranky and hard to row, but Junior is of such ample dimensions and so carefully designed that it rows quite easily, carries three and, even four adults, propels well with small outboard motors, and could even be sailed, if fitted out with simple sailing equipment. Last but not least, Junior makes an excellent car top boat for fishing or hunting anywhere, since it is lightweight, leakproof and easily handled afloat or ashore.

12 pages, 1 plate(s)

$7.95
Little Chief-- A 15 Foot Canvas Canoe (Pub. No. 5515)

by William D. Jackson, N.A.

"Little Chief" is a canoe with many virtues, ideally adapted to quick, easy construction. Canoes are not easy to build, but here is one example of the red man’s boat that can be made of ordinary materials and covered with canvas for a fraction of the cost of conventional canoes. It has attractive molded lines and may be built either as a paddling model or, with slight changes, adapted for use with small outboard motors.

8 pages, 1 plate(s)

$7.95
Sea Sled--A Hunting Boat in Masonite, The (Pub. No. 5516)

by C.L. Meehan

Seldom is a boat planned for the ordinary fellow not too handy with tools who is convinced that he could not shape wood into the complicated curves and angles that many designers delight in recommending.  For such men here is a boat that is simple in design. It is plainly not in a class with the usual flat-bottomed tubs so familiar on any body of water. No! This is a real sea sled. Modern! Attractive! And most efficient!  The sea sled or hydroplanetype is the only known water vehicle that, when engine driven, lifts itself clear of the water and rides on a cushion of air. The United States and British Navies have successfully used it for years.  The framework of this boat is covered with tough pressed wood (tempered Masonite, 1/8 inch thick). This remarkable material is proof against weather, acid, insects, termites, mold, decay, etc. It is pliable yet tough and can be bent into curves that are not extremely acute. It comes in 6, 8 and 10 foot lengths, 4 foot in width. Prospective builders may use plywood, instead.

8 pages, 1 plate(s)

$7.95
All-Purpose Portable Boat in Frame and Canvas, An (Pub. No. 5517)

by William D. Jackson, N.A.

Speeds of from five to thirty-five miles an hour, trolling speeds that delight the fisherman to speeds rivaling racing craft, are possible with the water ways companion described here. For these speeds It requires only from one to ten horsepower, and it may be carried atop an auto for sport in any location. It offers a general purpose boat that fulfills every small-craft need. Weighing 125 pounds, the hull is not only easily loaded and transported atop the auto, but, due to its efficient design and seaworthy proportions, it travels farther and faster on less gas and rows with a minimum of effort. The canvas covered hull is permanently leak proof, so that the boat is always ready for instant use. It is especially well adapted to home workshop construction.

12 pages, 2 plate(s)

$7.95
Jitter Bug--A Water Bicycle (Pub. No. 5518)

Built for exercise or sport, “Jitter Bug” is a hybrid creation combining qualities of both the bicycle and boat. Propelled easily with its twin paddles, with speeds up to 10 m.p.h. Jitter Bug will buck strong currents, operate in water depths as low asthree inches, and is easier to handle than any boat. No practice is necessary to operate and due to its unique design, tripping or tipping is impossible regardless of passenger weight, making it safe for children or adults.

12 pages, 2 plate(s)

$7.95
White Duck--A 14' Skiff (Pub. No. 5519)

This universal flat bottom rowboat (let’s call it the “White Duck”)--is one of the most versatile craft that can be built. Its simple, inexpensive construction and substantial design make it a safe boat for sport or recreation anywhere. It is especially well adapted to easy construction and is designed to be built from 14-foot lumber normally available almost anywhere.  Easily rowed or propelled by small outboard motors from 1 to 6 hp., it is seaworthy and stable on any waters and has the capacity of much larger boats.

8 pages, 1 plate(s)

$7.95
Kingfisher--A 9' Pram (Pub. No. 5520)

Originally developed separately by Scandinavian fishermen and Dutchmen hundreds of years ago for use upon rough open waters of the Old World, the pram reflects the qualities of these hardy seafarers, for it is exceptionally practical and useful under all conditions. This modernized version of the pram, which is here called the “Kingfisher,” is perhaps the most versatile craft that may be found. It rows easily, sails well, and propels nicely with small outboard motors. It weighs only 90-100 lbs. and therefore is easily handled and carried atop any auto for sport and adventure limited only by road maps. It is wide beamed and due to the commodious design its capacity is the equal of much larger boats. Casting or still fishing is easily accomplished standing upright in it. This pram will safely seat three persons. All construction details have been simplified to permit easy fabrication and material costs are easily within the reach of everyone.

10 pages, 1 plate(s)

$7.95
Blue Bill--A 13' Kayak/Canoe (Pub. No. 5521)

Combining the features of both kayak and canoe, “Blue Bill” is offered to those out-of-doors men who hunt or the sportsmen who need an ultra lightweight portable boat for use upon any waters. Besides being usable for building a double-end paddling model, a few changes permit the plans to be used for making a canoe that will accommodate outboard motors up to 6 hp. for swift, speedy transportation on any stream or waterway. Weighing only 75 lbs. complete, “Blue Bill” is easily transported atop an auto anywhere. All details of “Blue Bill” have been simplified for easy fabrication and the construction cost is within reach of everyone’s pocketbook.

8 pages, 1 plate(s)

$7.95
Handy Andy--A 10' Folding Boat (Pub. No. 5524)

Outdoor sportsmen encounter numerous waterways or adverse conditions where it is impossible to use the ordinary rigid boat or where its use is restricted, making it more of a liability than a convenience on a trip. The portable folding boat is not meant to dispense completely with the rigid boat, but to supplement its uses and to offer a ready means of water transportation where conventional type boats are excluded. Weighing only 80 lbs., simple and easy to construct, easily rowed or propelled with small outboard motors from 1 to 5 hp., this portable folding boat provides a lifetime of usage, under conditions unapproachable by conventional craft. The hull may be folded or unfolded in one minute’s time. It will stow away inside any auto, airplane, house trailer, or it may be packed under the arm and carried easily.

12 pages, 2 plate(s)

$7.95
Stubby--An Elegant Punt (Pub. No. 5543)

by Edwin Monk

This little boat is similar to one designed by the author for Pacific Motorboat and published in the February, 1930, issue of that magazine. It has proven quite popular and a large number have been built. This boat was 8’ 6” long with a beam of 4’, carried four people nicely and made a light, seaworthy little tender or rowboat. The new design has been simplifled somewhat, and has but one knuckle instead of two, and is a little longer being 9’ by 4’. In ease of construction, this type of boat is excelled only by the simple square-end punt, to which it is in every way superior.

8 pages, 1 plate(s)

$7.95
Saunterer--A 12' Rowboat (Pub. No. 5545)

While not quite so easy to build as a flat-bottom boat, the V-bottom type, like “Saunterer,” (sometimes called skipjacks or deadrise boats) have so many excellent characteristics that any additional work over that required for building a flatbottom craft is well worth while. This is especially true if the boat in question is to be propelled by oars.  “Saunterer” is exactly 1 in. over 12 ft. in length. The length on the water line, that is between stations 0 and 5  is 11ft. 4 in. The beam is 3 ft. 9 in., and the draft is 6 in. The freeboard at the bow is 18 in; and at the stern this height is 14 in. From these bare figures, you can gather that the boat will be dry and buoyant. Boats with low freeboard are quite all right in smooth water, but are unsafe when the wind blows.

12 pages, 3 plate(s)

$7.95
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