Small Craft Plans

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Building a Simple Flat-Bottom Rowboat (Pub. No. 5546)

The average rowboat is not entirely suitable for use with the outboard boat motor. The boat described in this article has been designed for the following: Perfect balance with the weight of the motor on the stern; a substantial stern and parts to carry the weight and hold up against vibration and strain; an easily riding bow that does not ship much water when the going is rough; large substantial seats; a front deck giving a motorboat appearance; light weight; ease of rowing, etc. The use of a motor on such a rowboat permits the builder to get into the motor-boat class to some extent, and a few of the refinements of the latter are embodied in the design. While this particular boat has been designed especially for use with an outboard motor, still the fundamentals of general rowboat practice have been closely followed.

10 pages, 1 plate(s)

$7.95
Building a Car-Top Boat (Pub. No. 5548)

by Edward R. Lucas

If you're a lake fisherman who likes frequent changes of scenery, this light weight car-top boat will permit you to drop a line in any body of water to which your car is able to transport you. Or if a non-fisherman who just likes to spend an occasional day on the water, your radius of enjoyment will be expanded well beyond its present limits. Although an ideal twoperson boat, the semi-V bottom and pram type construction make possible the accommodation of three individuals without swamping.

7 pages, 1 plate(s)

$6.95
Buddy--A 13 Foot Uitlity Boat (Pub. No. 5549)

"Buddy", a general utility boat, was designed to meet the greatest possible variety of purposes and to serve each one well. With an over-all length of 13 feet and a generous beam of 56 inches, the hull seats three or four passengers and performs with stability and seaworthiness in rough or smooth water. Outboard motors from 1 to 6 hp. will propel this craft speedily and economically, while rowing it is easy. For those who love sailing, “Buddy” may be rigged as a sailboat and it will perform comparably with regulation sailing craft.  The construction requires marine plywood, making the boat easy to build, inexpensive, and producing a craft that is light in weight, easily transported and permanently leakproof under all conditions.

16 pages, 1 plate(s)

$8.95
Snuffy An All-Purpose 11 ft Car Top Boat (Pub. No. 5589)

by William Jackson

"Snuffy" comes of a long line of car top boats that had varying characteristics— some were too bulky, others too small. This latest descendant not only presents a hull adapted to wide general usage, but fulfills all requirements for transient travel. It can be carried wherever autos may penetrate, being light in weight; is easy and inexpensive to build, easily rowed or propelled by a small outboard motor of from 1 to 10 h.p. Proportions are small but compact for ample accommodations and the boat is leakproof under all conditions if properly made.

12 pages, 2 plate(s)

$7.95
Gypsy a 15 ft Strip-Built Canoe (Pub. No. 5605)

You don’t have to steam bend any ribs to build this sturdy, light-weight canoe. Construction is modern and simplified using plywood forms.

While canoes have always had a greater appeal than perhaps any other type of boat, especially to those who like to hunt and fish, the thought of having to steam and bend in the fifty some odd ribs necessary in their construction discourages most men from attempting to build one. There are no bent ribs in this fifteen-footer; edge-nailed strip construction is used with plywood bulkhead moulds; the same type construction as is being so successfully used now aboard even large boats to give all the lightness, strength and grace associated with round-bilged boats without the trouble of steam bending

10 pages, 3 plate(s)

$7.95
Showboat a 16.5 ft Bicycle Powered River boat (Pub. No. 5608)

by Douglas Rolfe

This miniature “Showboat” is an ideal camp afloat for those who like to spend vacation days on lake or river. Economical to operate, it permits fun on limited budgets.

For generations the old stern-wheelers have been industriously churning their way up and down the great rivers of America, and even today the river Steamboat is a familiar sight at many of the old Mississippi landings. Showboat brings a small and simplified edition of these famous boats within the practical building scope of anyone interested in lake or river craft, and offers, besides novelty, extraordinary economy and remarkable cabin capacity for so small a craft. The advantages of the design are plentiful. In the first place it requires nothing beyond ordinary carpentering to build and no very special skill at that trade. Then again it provides the maximum of cabin space and yet draws so little water that it can be run into a safe landing wherever a few inches of water are available. On top of all that. unless it is engine operated, it costs nothing in the way of fuel to run. Showboat is powered by the crew and passengers. Two old bike frames, mounted side by side, are coupled quite simply, without a difficult conversion job, to the twin stern wheel so that two ordinary persons can comfortably propel this unique ship anywhere they choose to go. A small motor can of course be substituted for the "exercycles."

10 pages, 5 plate(s)

$7.95
Silas a 15 ft Utility Skiff (Pub. No. 5609)

by J.A. Emmett

The very name implies strength and sterling old-fashioned qualities—all of which this design has. Larger and more strongly built than the usual skiff it is too heavy, of course, for car-top carrying but will make a fine outfit for general use and fishing, when its stiffness, ability, and roominess will be appreciated. "Silas" will row more easily than the average boat her size, and drive nicely , up to 6 or 8 miles an hour, with a 2 to 3½ h.p. outboard. The model and size is well suited to inboard power and with a small air or a water-cooled inboard motor will prove a very able outfit; or she will sail well if fitted with a centerboard. In all she’s a darn useful boat to build and have around whatever way you decide to power her—oars, outboard, inboard, or sail.

12 pages, 3 plate(s)

$7.95
Jibe-Cat--A 16 ft Decked Racing Canoe (Pub. No. 5619)

If you're looking for a safe comfortable boat for pleasant afternoon sailing don’t build "Jibe-Cat". But if you’re in search of speed coupled with excitement and thrills and are willing to sacrifice comfort, this racing canoe is guaranteed to give satisfaction. All gear has been made as simple as possible consistent with maximum performance, and most of the fittings can, if necessary, be homemade of odds and ends. The construction is not difficult but since strength must be coupled with lightness, accurate workmanship and careful fitting is necessary if the boat is to look and perform her best. Just do right by the gal and she’ll attract favorable attention in the fastest company.

16 pages, 5 plate(s)

$8.95
Three Trailer Barges (Pub. No. 5622)

Park a house trailer on one of these barges and go to sea! (Well around the marina anyway)

The garvey type hull shown here in three designs and two sizes to suit a large, or small house trailer and in either waterproof plywood or ordinary lumber construction has several interesting possibilities as a houseboat proposition. Easy loading and unloading of the trailer has been kept uppermost in-mind. The barge’s long cut. away bow can be run far enough up on shore to take gangplanks down which the trailer can be backed by hand or car. With the trailer loaded, temporary deck beams forward are dropped in sockets and plywood or T. & G. built panels placed over them to form a spacious forward deck over which an awning can be arranged to suit.

16 pages, 5 plate(s)

$8.95
Tubby--A 17 ft Pontoon Boat (Pub. No. 5623)

by Peter Clarke

"Tubby", although not exactly beautiful to look at, represents a very useful and comfortable way of getting around on lakes and small sheltered coves. She was designed with the idea of producing a very simple-to-build craft that would give the maximum amount of deck space with the minimum expense. In spite of her ungainly appearance, with a four horsepower motor she can whip herself up to a fair and honest five miles an hour, and with over one hundred square feet of useful deck space available, there is ample room for swimming, diving, fishing, or even small parties. On one occasion, with the aid of a piece of tin on the fore deck, a very respectable weinie roast was held while slowly cruising along the lake. And the luxury of having a fishing party with three or four people fishing from deck chair.s was formerly reserved for those fortunate enough to own forty foot cruisers. But Tubby, though admittedly not as pretty, is every bit as much fun to own.

4 pages, 2 plate(s)

$6.95
Imada and How I Made Her, The (Pub. No. 5646)

(A Thames punt)

Reprinted from "The Boy's Own Paper."

by G.H. Bailey

The “Imada” is the name of my punt, with which I drift down the stream of life—which in my case is a very small trout stream, flowing slowly and silently through countless water meadows, eventually finding its way into the river Itchen at a spot just below Winchester.  There are many fellows living near such streams who cannot utilize them because the building of a small boat to them is a matter of great difficulty and expense; and it is for them that I here describe the building of a small flat-bottomed boat, which can be punted, paddled, or oared along, and which only draws an inch and a half of water.  From the instructions given it will be found easy to build; but, of course, great care must be taken in getting the measurements exact, and the seams well caulked to prevent leakage.

8 pages

$6.95
How to Make a Canvas Canoe (Pub. No. 5653)

by E.T. Littlewood

Reprinted from "The Boys Own Book of Boats"

"I propose to give directions for the construction of a canvas canoe, requiring no great expenditure of money, from a week to a fortnight of spare time, a very few tools, and a moderate amount of skill.  I have from time to time made canoes of various kinds, and have been led to adopt the pattern to be hereafter described as being most easily and cheaply constructed, and as possessing the important characters of speed, comfort, safety, and fair durability, and not being too heavy to carry on the shoulder for a quarter of a mile or so if necessary."

12 pages

$7.95
How to Build a Sectional Canoe (Pub. No. 5654)

by George Pontin

Reprinted from "The Boy's Own Paper."

I do not remember having seen a sectional canoe built to pack up and carry away in a very handy and portable state, and I think the accompanying designs will appeal to many readers as just the thing for the next holidays.  If a train journey has to be accomplished at first to get to the water, a canoe of ten or twelve feet long becomes somewhat of a trouble and is liable to get damaged en route as well, but when the twelve-footer can be made to take to pieces and pack up into one parcel of, say, five feet by two feet six, then the advantage of this type of craft becomes apparent.

7 pages, 1 plate(s)

$6.95
How I Rigged the Canoe "Frolic" (Pub. No. 5655)

by Major Battiscombe

Reprinted from "The Boy's Own Paper."

"On the afternoon of one day in the month of September of a year long past, when I was fifteen years old, I had walked down to the house of a man who had always been a great friend to my brothers and myself, and who lived close to the river Wye. In the course of conversation he said:  “I’ve thought of something to do this afternoon; we will launch my two Rob Roy canoes, and, as there is a nice breeze blowing up the river, we will have a sail.”  I nearly jumped for joy at the words; I had never sailed a canoe or anything else in my life, except a toy boat on the Round Pond in Kensington Gardens, and here was the ambition of my existence about tobe fulfilled. . . ."

8 pages, 1 plate(s)

$7.95
How to Build a Simple 14' Fishing Punt (Pub. No. 5661)

by Gordon Meggy

Reprinted from "The Boy's Own Paper

Ask the ordinary boat-builder how much he will charge to build you a fishing punt and he will probably surprise you with the extent of his demands. To remonstrate with him is useless. He enlarges upon the expense of material, the skill and knowledge required and the time occupied, and you will no doubt come to the conclusion that the craft is beyond your pocket.  Yet the building of a fishing punt is no difficult matter to anyone with a taste for amateur carpentering, and the cost will not exceed a few pounds, which will cover every possible item for a good punt 14 ft. long.

12 pages

$7.95
Featherweight--An 8' Duckboat (Pub. No. 5665)

Light enough to carry on a car or even on your shoulders, this boat will enable you to reach hideaways that are inaccessible with heavier craft. It is sturdy enough to push through dense weed growths and light enough to navigate the shallowest waters. Although only 8 ft. 4 in. long, "Featherweight" has a capacity of well over 300 pounds. Its construction of  ¼-in. Waterproof plywood over light pine framing gives it the well-proportioned lines shown in the illustration.

8 pages, 3 plate(s)

$7.95
Reelfoot Boat-A Forward Rowing Boat from Tenn, The (Pub. No. 5678)

by George Laycock

At one time found only in Tennessee, this popular craft is presently utilized in almost every state in the country.

The "Reelfoot Boat"  is an unusual and highly efficient boat that grew out of a need. Reelfoot Lake in northwestern Tennessee is studded with cypress stumps. Because of these stumps, Reelfoot natives and visiting sportsmen need to see where they are rowing. This prompted the invention of a peculiar oar with a double elbow in the middle that enables a fisherman to pull his oars in the customary fashion but go forward instead of backward—a definite aid in missing stumps. But the Reelfoot boat, with or without the bow-facing oars, has a lot to recommend itself to the average guy. It is rugged and easily maneuvered and is easily equipped with a motor.

12 pages, 2 plate(s)

$7.95
Little Fellow--A Midget Inboard Runabout for Kids (Pub. No. 5685)

This midget inboard has an outboard power plant.

by Robert Ruskauff

Got a little fellow who yearns to skipper his own craft? Then take a cue from Bob Brakensiek, a Californian who designed and built a pint-size inboard for his mne-year-old son. He was so successful that other dads went to work and now small salts as young as seven are veterans at the wheel.  Little Fellow is only 78 inches long, has a beam of 36 inches and weighs about 125 pounds. For power, Bob Brakensiek’s original model had a 71/2-hp engine which drove it along at 30 mph. However, it was later decided that a cutdown 5-hp Scott-Atwater outboard would be ample, giving a speed of 25 mp

4 pages, 2 plate(s)

$6.95
Canvasback--A Canvas Kayak (Pub. No. 5688)

by S. Calhoun Smith

Build this kayak in your bedroom with hand tools and C-clamps

This kayak is the answer for young people who want to build an inexpensive boat for summer fun. We turned out several Canvasbacks—and each took only a week of spare time. A shop full of power tools isn’t necessary, either. Ours consisted of a power jig saw and a quarter-inch electric hand drill. But all the work can be done with ordinary hand tools and a few C clamps.  Canvasback will carry one adult but it’s handiest when paddled by a youngster. The boat is stable in the water and, even though it can be turned over, it won’t sink. It’s also light enough to be carried with ease. Building is so simple that the “jig” consists of only two blocks and a few bricks.

8 pages, 3 plate(s)

$7.95
All purpose 11 1/2 ft Boat, An (Pub. No. 5699)

(For Oars, Sail, or Outboard Motor)

Designed for use with oars, sails, or outboard motor, the small all-purpose boat described here will provide exciting sport the year round on virtually any water. Its shallow draft makes it usable on streams and lakes that would bar some other boats of comparable size and utility. Weighing only 100 pounds , it can be transported atop a car or carried on a trailer. Two men can handle it easily, or even one if need be. Due to its simple construction, the boat is strong and sturdy, and will withstand any amount of banging around. It will seat three persons comfortably, and four if necessary. Regardless of how it is powered--sails, oars, or outboard--it will be found entirely seaworthy and stable.

6 pages, 3 plate(s)

$7.95
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