Small Craft Plans

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Designed for the man who likes to fish.
$7.95
by William D. Jackson, N.A.
Despite its small size the Jolly Roger also makes an excellent yacht dinghy for father.
$7.95
by Murray Ken
Here is the very last thing in simplicity of construction.
$7.95
This 11-inch hull comes out of a single sheet of 3
$8.95
by Robert J. Whittier
It's 131
$7.95
Here is a fisherman's outboard boat that has an exceptionally wide range of usefulness.
$7.95
The skiff type of hull is eminently seaworthy and carries a heavy load safely.
$7.95
This skiff-type hull is a favourite of experienced fishermen.
$7.95
This handy twelve-foot skiff is a refinement of larger, heavier boats.
$7.95
Pedal Cat (Pub. No. 5829)

by William D. Jackson

You can pedal or power this water cruising bicycle.

Pedal Cat is a paddle-wheel driven catamaran which you operate much the same as a bicycle. It will navigate in about 3½ in. of water, is silent, and can be used upon protected waters anywhere. Resort operators will find this water craft a popular addition to a fleet of rentable boats. If you prefer to power it with a small outboard motor, the paddle wheel may be removed and the motor clamped to an engine support board. Simply lock the outboard motor in the dead-ahead position and steer with the handlebar-controlled rudder. The materials needed to build Pedal Cat are exterior fir plywood and pine, fir or hemlock solid stock available at local lumber yards. The paddle-wheel foot cranks, bearings and handle bar are made of ordinary standard pipe and pipe fittings available at local hardware or plumbing stores.  The pontoons measure almost 10 ft. in length. If 4 x 10 ft. plywood panels are available, well and good; if, however, your lumber dealer stocks only 4 x 8 ft. panels, it’s an easy matter to butt join the pieces with reinforcing lap blocks.

18 pages, 2 plate(s)

$8.95
Jump'n-Jack--The Jack-Knife Trailer Boat (Pub. No. 5830)

by Berthel Madsen

LOA 9 FT. 7 IN., BEAM 3 FT. 10 1/2 IN., WEIGHT 120 LBS., SEATING CAPACITY 2 PERSONS.

Fishermen-Campers! Here is your boat and trailer combined into one easy-to-build project.

As a boat, you can use oars or outboard motor up to 51/2 hp. Simply folding it over like a knife changes it into a one-wheel trailer for carrying your fishing or camping gear. But that’s not all—-slipping the wheel into the keel makes it easy to portage the whole unit right down to the water’s edge, using the oars as handles. As a trailer, there’s 40 cu. ft. of storage for fishing and camping gear, food and clothing. Not only is this boat functional, it’s easy to build. There’s no form necessary, and you build the boat in one section, sawing it in two when complete. All in all, it’s an ideal boat to build.

11 pages, 3 plate(s)

$7.95
Glide-Easy (Pub. No. 5832)

by William D. Jackson

LOA 15 FT., BEAM 36 IN., WEIGHT 75 LB., SEATING CAPACITY 2 PERSONS.

A rugged, quickly built canoe.

If you have ever struggled with the oars of a heavy, slow-moving rowboat—and then paddled a swift, high maneuverable canoe—you can appreciate why many true sportsmen prefer canoes. But, too often, the multi-ribbed conventional canoe is not only hard to build but too thin-skinned for hard usage. This design teams up plywood and fiber glass to produce a tough, scrape-proof canoe you can build in one-tenth the time it would take you to turn out a conventional canoe. The use of only one frame offsets the extra weight of using plywàod, so that this canoe is still light enough for comfortable portage. Glide-Easy can be built with a square stem for use with an outboard motor or as a double-ender for paddling.

10 pages, 4 plate(s)

$7.95
Sea Midge--Snug, Small, Three-way Pram (Pub. No. 5833)

by William D. Jackson

LOA 8 FT., BEAM 52 IN., WEIGHT OF HULL 65 LBS., SPARS 10 LBS., SEATING CAPACITY 2 PERSONS.

May be rowed or sailed or adapted for use with outboard motors of from 1 o 3 hp.

Designed with a convex bottom for maximum speed whether powered by sail, outboard motor or oars, Sea Midge is modeled on an Old World boat originally developed as a yacht dinghy for use upon the North Sea. It is an excellent all-around workhorse and is light enough to be carried anywhere. Construction of Sea Midge is simplicity itself.

5 pages, 4 plate(s)

$7.95
Rob Roy--A Combination Canoe-Kayak (Pub. No. 5836)

by Weston Farmer

She’s a combination boat with two sheer heights. You’ll use her as a one- or two-man canoe, a one-man rowboat, or even as a large kayak.

LOA 15 ft., BEAM 42 IN., DRAFT 41/2 IN.

An ardent canoeist and black fly devotee dropped into my Powder Island boat shop up on Nipigon Bay, Canada, last  summer. “I gotta have a boat that doesn’t exist,” sez he. “It’s got to be as good as a canoe, but lighter. I may want to paddle her as a kayak, the better for shooting come fall. If I’m alone and toting a good camp load, rowing will cover more miles in a day than paddling. She’ll have to be light because I may want to strap her to the pontoons of my Beaver and fly inland. I’ll want her to be stiff, too.” He allowed as how he was going to hang around my boat and stoke at my galley stove until I designed him a special sort of craft for cartop and camp use. So it didn’t take me long to galvanize the idea of Rob Roy. She is named for the famed Scottish canoe of several generations ago in which Robert Louis Stevenson crossed Europe on its canals and lakes, and about which he wrote so charmingly in The Adventures of Rob Roy*. This Rob Roy in no way resembles Stevenson's boat, except that she is small, slim, and light. Our current Rob Roy fills my friend’s variety of needs to a T, and is built of plywood which Stevenson never heard of. Her main function will be as a canoe; she’ll serve as a kayak; she’ll row easier than a St. Lawrence skiff, though she is really none of these. You will note from the arrangement plan that Rob Roy is a double-ender. And, if you want to use her as a canoe as most people will, she is fitted with cane canoe seats. Placed as shown, these seats will properly balance two persons for team paddling on long treks. Between paddiers you can accommodate a goodly load—up to 400 pounds of tent, gun, food and gear. She’ll be tender when light, of course—all light craft with dead rise are—but load her down, and she stiffens surprisingly and is much stiffer than a canoe. Yet she moves easily under paddle. Her steeved-up bow will not dump seas inboard as a canoe’s bow does. When camping alone you sit on the bow thwart or seat, the narrow end of the craft is astern, and your load forward. Balanced thus, normal oneman canoe action prevails. But I like my friend’s idea of rowing when single-handing it. It’s less tiring faster going safer So I have shown permanent rowlocks. Seven-foot silver spruce oars in loose, leathered oarlocks - (the only safe oarlock) will complement your equipment. Kayak cranks will not fare badly on a seat placed as shown, using a double-bladed paddle and facing forward. Fine for marsh crawling, casting and camera work.

*The correct title for Stevenson's fine book is "An Inland Voyage", and it is availble in reprint in The Shellback's Library from The Press at Toad Hall.

13 pages, 2 plate(s)

$7.95
Yo Ho!--A Plywood Cartopper (Pub. No. 5841)

by Weston Farmer

Designed with easy bends in her planking this boat is light enough to be tossed atop your car. Cheap, too.

LOA 13 FT., BEAM 50 IN.

YO HO! is not the best looking boat I have lifted from my drawing board these past 35 years—not by a long shot. But she very successfully incorporates extreme ease of building with very nice water feel. As my good old friend Billy Atkin, dean of American motorboat designers, says, “A good small boat is harder to design than a good large boat.” So I am happy to relate that an unusually good compromise has been doped out in Yo Ho! She has enough rocker to row reasonably well, yet not enough to kill her for planing work. She will putzz along with a 11/2 hp Elgin kicker at 7 miles; can use the Evinrude angle shaft 3 hp motor, and even take 71/2 hp Champions, Johnsons, Scott-Atwaters or Mercuries. A Yo Ho! was built—-see photos—-and the lessons learned are here incorporated for the final release as a perfected design. A boat for ideal cartop carrying should come within the limits set by the usual 52” car carrier spreaders, and should be reasonably flat in sheer to accommodate wide variation in car crowns. The Yo Ho! experimental model, preliminary to this design, was 12’ long by 48” beam, 16” depth. While her water performance fitted the outlined requirements, I felt that her rocker could be flattened a little without interfering with good rowing, that her dead rise could be increased to give a boatier feel, and that a pram type bow with a rounded block stem would take less bending. So our published and final version of Yo Ho! is one foot longer—l3 ft.; her beam is 50” over the sheer guard; and her depth has been increased io 18”. This accounts for the slight difference in modeling between the photo version and the design here. Another difference incorporated was to put the steering wheel on center. This gimmick is useful with 5 hp and over. So is a little water speedometer, shown on the dash. She is simplicity itself to build.
There is no sny in any of her planks--no twisting bends, in landlubber language-—to baffle the neophyte constructor. Anybody who can run a saw, use a plane, and drive screws can do about as good a job as a professional boatbuilder

4 pages, 3 plate(s)

$6.95
How Prams are Built--With Plans for an 8 ft. Pram (Pub. No. 5843)

with Plans for "Jennie" an 8-ft. Pram

by Weston Farmer

LOA 8 FT., BEAM 42 IN.

You see prams everywhere. They are numerous as lily pads. Why? They’re duck soup to build, and they’re light, useful, and fun. Here is the dope on them, with plans for a good one. I’ve named her Jennie because she is plump, and plain-—a little wren in the boat family. The pram may seem a new type, but actually they are old, being English in derivation. Until plywood got itself waterproof and gave everybody a cheap hull covering, the only prams you would see were rather heavy. So they were used chiefly abroad, mainly as mooring tenders to pint-sized British singlehanded sailing achts. The first pram design published in this country was the Wee Pup designed, if I recall correctly, by Edson B. Schock, a friend of mine and naval architect, iather of our Edson I. Schock. Her plans appeared at least 40 years ago. I built one taking 80 hours, because those were peaceful days; and Wee Pup was cross-planked, clinker tppsided—-all the befoodilements of old-time boatbuilding, for which there is now little patience.

12 pages, 3 plate(s)

$7.95
Binky--An All-Around Tender (Pub. No. 5845)

by Weston Farmer

Added plesure in gunning or fishing on your next cruise can be yours with this specially designed little craft. She's an excellent beginner's project.

LOA 12 FT. 6 IN., BEAM 461/4 IN., DRAFT 6 IN.

Any naval architect will tell you that a good small boat is much harder to design than a good big boat. The reason is obvious. To be good, a small boat has to meet a greater variety of compromises. She will be used more ways for more reasons than will a larger vessel. This fact has just been brought home to me. An 80-foot steel tug designed for a Canadian pulpwood outfit took less preliminary sketching time than Binky here. This will give you a clue to how much trouble it is to work out something good in the small boat line. Now a dinghy is toughest of all small boats to design. She must be dry in a sea; she must be good under oars. She must be light to tote well. So that, if her parent ship is large enough, she can be hauled aboard and snugged down. Rowing boats do not as a rule tow well. A dinghy must do all these things, and be boss of the situation if a kicker is used. Gunning and fishing and gunk-holing add much to the pleasure of using a larger boat. And the dink, like a good wife, makes a team of your whole outfit. I think this Binky design answers the correct set of prayers. Outwardly she looks like a million other skiff models. Skiff plans appear like dust in the Milky Way. Flat skiffs won’t tow well if they row well. If built of plywood they are rubbery unless lap-seamed. This boat is flat enough to tow well, enough rocker to row well and is helped by the cutaway skeg. There is a little dead rise, which is magic but critical stuff. It works wonders for boat feel only if you know how to use it.

8 pages, 2 plate(s)

$7.95
Auto-Top Size Fisherman's Boat (Pub. No. 5863)

by Bruce N. Crandall

LOA 111/2 FT., BEAM 4 ft. 9 in., DRAFT 6 1/2 in., DISPLACEMENT 575 lbs.

An easy-to-build 111/2-foot, medium-high-speed, soft-riding utility, it's specially designed for low-horsepower outboards and features simple, light construction.

This is a general-utility, auto-topsize outboard boat designed for use with the modern economical 5and 6-hp fisherman’s motors. It is a developable-surface, sheet-plywood model, particularly easy for an amateur to build. The construction is simple and light, with relatively few frames, as the boat is soft-riding and not intended for use at high planing speeds, at which it could be subjected to hard pounding. It is light enough to be carried about on an auto-top carrier. An easy-planing and efficient bottom design is necessary to get the most economical operation from small 5- and 6-hp motors. Their gas economy may be quite poor on a hull which they cannot make plane, but they are capable of 30 miles per gallon or even more on a planing hull of the proper size. The type of bottom design used here is efficient and soft-riding at low planing speeds, though less efficient—uses more fuel for the speed, in other words—than many others at higher planing speeds. Compared to other bottom types, it is also quite efficient at semiplaning speeds, which helps make planing easier with small motors. It’s the large planing area and uniform angle of attack that make planing easier and increase efficiency at iow planing speeds. Absence of suction drag at the chines also increases efficiency at semiplaning and low planing speeds. The seating arrangement is designed for most efficient weight distribution at semi-planing and planing speeds up to 18 mph. With 5- and 6— hp motors, good fore-and-aft weight distribution can be attained with only one aboard, sitting in the stern seat steering by the motor handle, provided the fuel tank and all other weights are placed as far forward as possible. About the same weight distribution will result with the driver in the forward seat, steering by a wheel, and all other weights placed far aft. With two people aboard and the same 5- or 6-hp motor, the boat will be in semi-planing condition and therefore will stand more weight forward; thus two can sit in the forward seat with the rest of the weight aft, or one forward and one aft with all other weights far forward. With motors of less than 5 hp, the boat will always be in semi-planing condition, and it will be difficult to get the correct fore-and-aft balance with only one person aboard except by driving from the forward seat with either a steering wheel or an extension handle. With motors of about 8 hp, the boat will plane with two people aboard, and a steering wheel becomes necessary for safe operation. This is an ideal small fishing boat for most protected waterways, not only because of its exceptional efficiency with 5- and 6-hp motors, but also because it is very seaworthy and safe for its size. The freeboard is higher and the beam much greater than that of the average auto-topsize boat, making for much better stability. This same extra width, especially at the transom, makes for very poor efficiency at speeds below 10 mph, when the hull is in pure displacement condition—-for transom drag is considerable at these speeds. For this reason the hull will not be suitable for rowing any great distance, although it will handle quite well with oars while still-fishing. A hull for best efficiency at rowing speed or with a 1- or 2-hp motor should be very long and narrow, with almost no transom. This same inefficiency at slow speeds, however, especially the transom drag, makes the boat ideal for trolling with a 5- or 6-hp motor, as the transom drag acts much like a trolling plate or large bucket dragged behind and enables the driver to easily secure any trolling speed desired.

8 pages, 5 plate(s)

$7.95
Quicksilver (Pub. No. 5878)

by Weston Farmer

LOA 11 ft 5 in., beam 50.5 in.

Although she is easy to build, she will do a lot of things most prams won’t do. Designed to give low-cost thrills, she can handle a 10hp kicker.....;f you’ve got the stuff to go right along with her. With a little power, she’ll be 5 to 10 miles an hour, faster than most prams. She’ll build for lust about $50*

This cute little boat will be very easy to build because she is simply a shaped box. The transoms, frames and topsides are all straight work and only the forward bottom, or foreplane will require some sweat and savvy. Though she is simple she has a design basis that is as involved as an airplane, and I’m here to tell the world she’ll do a lot of things most prams won’t. She is designed to give low-cost thrills with an average service type 5 hp mill. She can handle a 71/2 hp job and with it will plane two people. For those who like their thrlils hairbreadth, she can handle a 10 hp kicker, but you’d better be young and agile and have nerve! Quicksilver will build for about $50 to $55, or a shade more, depending upon location. For this sum you’ll get a boat that will stow atop your car, which all small prams will do. With little power, she’ll be 5 to 10 miles an hour faster than most prams. Because of the step, she’ll balance with two people just like a plain fishing boat (most prams won’t do this) and if you want to install oarlocks and use oars, she’ll make a splendid fisherman’s rig. The drag of step under oars will not be noticeable. At anchor, because of high-steeved chine forward and buoyancy in the forward portion of the hull, she’ll ride drier than most prams. Because of their form, step hydroplanes have certain advantages of loading and trim when used in nonplaning or displacement condition. I have drawn the water lines on the outboard profile showing various load conditions. By placing a blank sheet of paper from line to mating line, you’ll see that her trim under various load conditions doesn’t change much.

* Those are 1955 dollars!--DNG

8 pages, 4 plate(s)

$7.95
Chippewar--A Plywood Canoe (Pub. No. 5883)

by Weston Farmer

LOA 15 ft., Beam about 34 in., weight about 63 lbs in 5/16 in ply and about 76 lbs. in 14 in. ply.

Here is the first design ever published for a plywood canoe that has all of the real canoe size and shape.

In these plans you are looking at the first design ever published for a plywood canoe that has real canoe shape and size. Her name is Ckippewa, and she is carefully engineered to a fine grain for those canoe lovers who have the skill to do a nice bit of wood cutting. For some reason, canoe builders are rabid purists—heat, close work does not stump them, and they’ll agonize over every little fastening and refinement. Eighty per cent of all boat design lies in the art of sizing. This is most true of a canoe, because, like a fly rod, or a gun butt, or a golf club, the thing is almost worn, and slight differences in measurements become very noticeable. Chippewa, you’ll find, is sized just right. I’ve taken great pains to make her so. Although her construction will not trouble anyone who is competent with hand tools, I am presuming that she will not be your first boat and that you’ll understand the rudiments of laying down, fairing and, in general, setting up the moulds on which to build her.

8 pages, 5 plate(s)

$7.95
Sea Skiff--A 131/2" Fishing Skiff (Pub. No. 5523)
/Designed for the man who likes to fish.

Designed for the man who likes to fish.

by William D. Jackson,N.A.

The evolution of a boat design is sometimes just as interesting as the boat itself. Certainly that’s true of this "Sea Skiff". A long line of similar skiffs had been designed in years past, and something worthwhile was learned from each. Then, when the United States entered World War II, I joined the Emergency Rescue Boat Company—a service whose chief occupation was the rescue of flyers down at sea and, sometimes, of survivors from some torpedoed ship. Many types of skiffs were used in this service. From these craft, too, valuable lessons were learned, and all that experience has been applied to design of this "Sea Skiff"

7 pages, 2 plate(s)

$7.95
Jolly Roger--A Simple 8 Foot Skiff (Pub. No. 5547)
William D. Jackson, N.A./Despite its small size the Jolly Roger also makes an excellent yacht dinghy for father.

by William D. Jackson, N.A.

"Jolly Roger"—shades of Captain Kidd and Morgan. Here is a small boat for big or little adventurers easily built of flat bottom design for those small tars who thirst for high adventure on a pond where the sunfish lurk. Despite its small size the Jolly Roger also makes an excellent yacht dinghy for father.

8 pages, 1 plate(s)

$7.95
Zinky Dink a 14 ft. Steel Skiff (Pub. No. 5588)
Murray Ken/Here is the very last thing in simplicity of construction.

ZINKY DINK, by Ken Murray
Ease of handling and absolute safety probably top the list of a dozen or more reasons for the steady increase in popularity of the steel boat. Each year finds them in increasing numbers on inland lakes and streams, in use by fishermen and hunters and by just plain citizens who want the enjoyment of easy oaring or extra swiftness of outboard-motoring. It relieves the mind and makes boating more enjoyable to know that built-in air chambers make the steel boat unsinkable.  In the past, plans for construction of a tested steel boat have either been retained as a trade secret by the manufacturers, or, what is more likely, construction has appeared too difficult to be attempted by most amateur builders. Actually, the assembling of a steel job is no more complicated than following the designs of many of the small wood boats.

TINKER--by Bradley Brewer and Douglas Rolfe
The word “simple” is so overdone that it is hardly surprising to find the novice inclined to mistrust any job so labelled. In the case of “Tinker” the word is thoroughly justified. Here is the very last thing in simplicity of construction.  Actually, no special boat-building knowledge or experience is required to duplicate this little craft. Though small, “Tinker” is by no means a toy and will serve not only as an excellent general purpose rowboat but also as a neat little sailing dinghy.

12 pages, 4 plate(s)

$7.95
One-Sheet of Plywood (14-ft) Rowboat, A (Pub. No. 5686)
/This 11-inch hull comes out of a single sheet of 3/8-inch plywood.

Make it from one piece of plywood (14 ft.)

This 11-inch hull comes out of a single sheet of 3/8-inch plywood. We used Weldwood Royal Marine Plywood for the job. It can be put together by almost any workshopper with a minimum amount of tools and time.  It rows smartly and gets a real burst of speed from a 3 to 5-hp outboard, actually planing like a runabout. It won’t tip or trip with its generously flared sides and will take a rough clop. It can be lifted on top of a car by one man. It will carry up to four persons. The editors feel that it’s impossible to get so much water transport anywhere for so little cost.

16 pages, 2 plate(s)

$8.95
Simple 13 1/2 Ft. Outboard Skiff, A (Pub. No. 5693)
Robert J. Whittier/It's 131/2 feet long, and is ideal for fishing or cruising.

by Robert Whittier

It’s 131/2 feet long, and is ideal for fishing or cruising

Here is a 13½-foot utility skiff which will appeal to fishermen and others who want something suitable for outboard motors in the 3 to 71/2-hp range. This boat’s hull has been designed to run efficiently at moderate speeds with small motors and, while it has the strength to handle greater power, motors larger than this will cause its bow to ride high and the bottom to pound. If you wish to use a large motor it would be best to choose some other design. The details of this boat have been thoroughly worked out and many have been built from these plans. The “boxy” look characteristic of many simplified designs has been avoided, yet if the plans and instructions are followed it should go together with no difficulty. This boat is very stable and is ideal for fishing and general use, or as a children’s boat. it is quite buoyant and, while not intended for open water, will prove quite safe on lakes and bays.

12 pages

$7.95
11' 6" Fisherman's Boat (Pub. No. 5007)
/Here is a fisherman's outboard boat that has an exceptionally wide range of usefulness.

Here is a fisherman's ouitboard boat that has an exceptionally wide range of usefulness. It islight , perfectly adapted for small motors, and handles well with oars--three qualities desired by all fishermen. With a larger motor it becomes a fast runabout and planes nicely. Practically no speed is sacrificed in obtaining its excellent riding quality, and the chop of the waves is cut through with remarkably little bounce. Any motor from 3 to 16 h.p. may be used. With a 9-h.p. motor, speeds up to 25 m.p.h. are easily possible, and 35 m.p.h. with one of 16 h.p. Designed for fishing and all-round use as a family boat, the hull is seaworthy enough for open bodies of water and has plenty of buoyancy for three or four adults. Two men can lift it without difficulty onto a light trailer. Batten-seam construuction prevents leaking no matter how often the boat is dried out.

10 pages, 4 plate(s)

$7.95
Fast 14-ft Skiff (Pub. No. 5014)
/The skiff type of hull is eminently seaworthy and carries a heavy load safely.

(For Oars or Outboard Motor)
For general use, under a wide variety of conditions, it would be difficult to find a better hull than this V-bottomed outboard skiff. Adapted for use on any water--river, lake, and ocean-- the skiff type of hull is eminently seaworthy and carries a heavy load safely. The lapstreak construction of this skiff has many advantages, not the least of which is its light weight, approximately 225 pounds, which makes the completed craft easy to transport by trailer. This bot is stiff, immensely strong and durable. It doesn't require soaking, being always ready for use. The laps formed by the bottom contribute considerably to speedy performance, as well as helping to eliminate excess spray. The V-bottomed skiff is usable with any outboard motor, from one horespower up to and including the most powerful made. The speed will range from five to forty-five miles an hour, depending on the type of motor used. The craft can be rowd easily, despite its ample proportions, and five to seven persons can be safely accomoded in the roomy seats.ned for all-round use, the streamline hollow surfboard carries two persons easily and the other 4 designs provide a variety of other options.

8 pages, 2 plate(s)

$7.95
14-Ft Utility Skiff (Pub. No. 5017)
/This skiff-type hull is a favourite of experienced fishermen.

(For Oars or Outboard Motor)
These are the plans of a well-known East Coast yacht builder who has been onstructing fishing skiffs and other types of utility boats for many years. This 14-foot skiff is a favorite of experienced fishermen and is used extensively on Chesapeake Bay as well as in other parts of the country. These skiffs row easily and drive well with a small outboard motor, and they can be made either of ordinary lumber or of marine-grade plywood. In either case, since the molds remain intact when the hull is removed, more than one skiff can be built on the same form. This is a decided advantage for those who wish to make a number, say for a livery, and it's also handy where two friends, each wanting a skiff, decide to team up and do the job together.

13 pages, 3 plate(s)

$7.95
Skipper-A Simple 12-Foot Skiff (Pub. No. 5033)
/This handy twelve-foot skiff is a refinement of larger, heavier boats.

This handy twelve-foot skiff is a refinement of larger, heavier boats. It is short enough, and sufficiently light in weight, to be carried atop a car or house trailer and, like all flat-bottomed boats, is comparatively easy to huild

14 pages

$7.95
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