Data Sheets

Our Data and Plan Sheet series is made up of informative reference articles from the literature. For a modest price, Data Sheets contain information selected from our classic books or the periodical literature reprinted to provide specific information on a particular subject. Plan Sheets are for boat building projects and contain building plans. These items measure  8.5" x 11" and contain between 1 and 4 pages. Most of the Data Sheets and Plan sheets are illustrated.

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Bubbles (7001)

by Charles Bell

LOA 8',  DEPTH 20". BEAM 4', WEIGHT 100 lbs.

Here is a dinghy which should meet the requirements of most yachtsmen who want a light but stable dinghy.

Capable of carrying three adults while being rowed, but one which can be sailed for fun in quiet harbors as well. She weighs 100 lbs., is only eight feet long, 20” deep and four feet wide and she is about as simple as a boat can be to build. BUBBLES can be built using either of two methods. The first is the much talked-about Bubble Mold, a mold method which uses a bubble of air and is explained in the article.

4 page(s)

$3.50
Wendy Third (7002)

by Charles Bell

LOA 10', BEAM 51", DRAFT Approx. 6"

Wendy Third is a further development of her predecessors, Wendy and Wendy Two.

These two class racers were such successful performers that further development of building methods was considered to bring construction of this popular class within the scope of any home builder with ordinary skills as well as for the more expert among us. The lines are the same as before with certain refinements to ease lamination of the sheer and chine pieces.

4 page(s)

$3.50
Fisherman (7003)

by Charles Bell

LOA 12', BEAM 5'

Fisherman was designed with one purpose in mind—fishing.

Although she has a planing type bottom, she is not intended for high-horsepower motors—10 to 15 will do nicely and some of you, undoubtedly, will use a 20. Only 12 feet in length but of good beam, she will be easy to get in and out of the water and will be comfortable to work a line in, in most sheltered lakes and rivers—no rapids, please; leave those to the professional stunt men and the boats designed for them.

4 page(s)

$3.50
Mohawk (7004)

by Charles Bell

16’ long, weighs 65 lbs. and has 240 lbs. of built-in flotation
.

Mohawk is designed especially for light weight and as such must be handled with judgment. You can’t toss a 75-lb. pack into the bottom from the dock, nor can you jump aboard with abandon yourself. She is plenty tough, however, properly handled and will be a joy to carry on those portages. For ordinary use, where no portages are involved, a light slat bottom can be used in the bottom. This consists of about 6 long spruce slats, ¼” x 1½” x full length, held together by a few crossties. This will help protect the bottom and will add another 10 lbs. of weight.

4 page(s)

$3.50
Shorebird (7005)

by Weston Farmer

LOA 14' 3", BEAM 5'

Here’s a flat bottom grain-belt yacht—for those lazy fishing days out for sunfish or yellow perch. As easy building as baiting a hook, she features a built-in live well

Out on the sunfish and crappie waters of the Iowa and Minnesota sand lake country, you’ll see hundreds of board-and-slat skiffs pulled up on shore. There’s nothing fancy about these grain-belt yachts. Their claim to fame is their simplicity and economy. They may not be worthy of floor space at a boat show, and you never see one of their kind there, but for quick building, satisfaction in service and long life, they are just the ticket. Anybody who wants to go fishing badly enough can build one. For sitting in the sun over a crappie hole, you can’t beat ‘em. Shorebird here is typical of the type. You cut out a stem, bolt a couple of plain planks to the stem through temporary cleats, spread the planks with a midship mould, and then horse the planks home to the transom with a Spanish windlass. What you’ll have is not a thing of beauty, nor the most perfect of fiat-bottomed models. Nevertheless, it is a boat that you can row fairly well, which will also take a 2 or 3 hp light outboard. Her bottom rockers according to the sweep of her bent topside planking and her dimensions are dictated by lumber available in standard sizes in any local yard. She is heavy enough to weather any average chop. Just remember that as long as the forefoot of a flat-bottomed boat is loaded a little below the waterline, they act like boats. Get them cocked too high and they slam—all of them

4 page(s)

$3.50
Kodiak Kayak (7007)

by Hi Sibley

LOA 15' 8", BEAM 24"

You don’t have to be an Eskimo to build and enjoy this buoyant little craft. And it’s bound to please a water-minded youngster.

If you don’t happen to have any walrus ribs or deer hide handy, you can make a very good facsimile of an Alaskan kayak with plywood, pine and canvas. Here is a model that’s seaworthy as well as light. The cockpit is just aft of amidships to give more buoyancy forward to ride the surf better

4 page(s)

$3.50
Power Punt (7008)

by Hi Sibley

LOA 10',BEAM 3'

Simplicity of design makes this craft the delight of the novice builder. It’s 16 feet of pure joy for the kiddies

Here is 16 feet of fun for all, and the simple design avoids those problems that beset the builder of a conventional boat. It can be powered by a lawn mower or scooter engine, or any of the small air-cooled jobs from ¾ hp to 2 hp, or more. Obviously it’s no speedboat, but glides over the water at from 4 mph to 10 mph, depending on the size of the motor. And it will carry about as many as you can pile on--kids that is!

3 page(s)

$3.50
Sailing Dinghy of Plyfoam (7010)

by Charles Bell

With brand new lightweight plyfoam, the home builder’s task and tools are minimized.

Would-be home builders with more spirit than skill for that sailing dink, take heart. And take a hard look at a new core material called Plyfoam, a rigid polyvinyl chloride developed by the firm of Potter Instruments Inc., Plainview, N.Y. for use in “sandwich” construction. Marketed in sheets of 1/4” and 1/2” thickness, it’s intended for use with polyester or epoxy plastics, and with a variety of reinforcing materials of which the most commonly used is fiberglass. With this in mind, I’ve designed a sailing dinghy which will weigh about 50 pounds, but which is stronger than a comparable plywood dink. Even, a conventional fiberglass hull would have to be far heavier to be as stiff and sturdy. It will carry heavy loads in a breeze and be quite lively for one or two people to sail. Outside of the form or building jig, the Plyfoam, fiberglass and resin require a minimum of tools—a brush, razor blades and pair of scissors will do the trick.

4 page(s)

$3.50
Fiberglass Top for the Open Outboard, A (7011)

With modern plastic materials—Styrofoam, fiberglass and epoxy—you can make your own lightweight top and, by enclosing the sides with polyethylene or plexiglass and the cockpit with vinyl- or neoprene-impregnated nylon, convert your boat for overnight use.

After a season’s cruising with the family aboard, the average skipper has, no doubt, thought of several improvements he’ll want to make in the boat during the winter layover. One good addition for cruising comfort would be to build a cabin top. A top will convert an open boat into an overnight cruiser, provide shelter during a rainstorm and shade passengers from the hot sun during the summer. The cabin top shown here can be built as a single piece or can have the cockpit extension cover; either way it will add immeasurably to the usefulness of an open runabout and its ultimate trade-in value when you decide to go for a larger boat. The drawings do not give dimensions because your particular boat will determine how large the top must be; each skipper will have to make it fit his own boat. General construction and only those dimensions which are standard for certain items are provided.

2 page(s)

$3.50
Fiberglass Flying Bridge Shelter Top (7012)

Several new developments in plastics and fabric materials are now available to yachtsmen interested in improving or maintaining conventionally constructed boats.

These products include new polysulfide rubber seam compound and adhesives, new urethane, epoxy, vinyl and polysulfide synthetic rubber coatings and foamed urethane plastic boards; all available in the boating market place. Among the many inquiries I receive are always these two questions: “Are these plastics hard to use?” “Can I do the job?” And my answer is this: If you can handle the paint job on a boat, if you can cover the cabin top with canvas, if you can build a hatch cover, then you can handle plastics. The approach may be a little different but the materials handle in much the same way as those you’ve been using. Liquid plastics are like varnish. They look like varnish, they feel like varnish in the brush and they will run like varnish when applied so that you must handle them in the same way. The difference is that they will not cure (or “dry”) unless you add something to the plastic when you are ready to apply it. You sometimes have to add a little thinner to paint in order to use it, so what is really difficult about adding a little catalyst to cure the plastic? The only refinements are: 1. The correct amount of catalyst to add. 2. Plastic will dry in the pot in about 45 minutes, unlike paint which will dry on the surface of the job in a few hours but will only skin over in the pot. With plastic, you have to use the batch into which you have stirred the catalyst within the dry time and you have to wash out the brush in order to save it from becoming a plastic solid reinforced with brush hairs.

2 page(s)

$3.50
Building Fiberglass Ruders and Spinnaker Poles (7013)

The use of fiberglass in boat construction is not limited to hulls and superstructures. Interesting new practical applications are being discovered every day.

The problems of wood construction of yacht rudders have always been well known, but fiberglass-reinforced plastic at last offers the solution.

4 page(s)

$3.50
Build a Fiberglass Sink for Your Boat (7014)

The difference between a boat and a yacht is often in her appointments. Why not build a one-piece fiberglass countertop and sink as the show piece of the galley for your boat?

Plan the counter-top and sink combination to fit the space you have in your boat, but remember that the stove can be a pull-out drawer affair, under the counter, which will save room on the Counter-top for drying dishes or mixing salads. The mold is simple to make and should not scare anyone off who can glue boards together and sand and paint same.

2 page(s)

$3.50
How to Build a Fiberglass Icebox (7015)

Now that the techniques of fiberglass construction have reached a stage where it is relatively easy for the average boat owner to build some of his interior accommodations of this versatile material.

It’s high time you gave that old, rusty, landlubber ice-box, chopped up to fit the space, the deep six and build a rust-proof, modern job out of fiberglass. Lay down that belaying pin, mate; it won’t cost a fortune. In fact, the cost will surprise you, it’s so little in comparison to what you’d have to pay for almost any other material. It’s cheap, it’s easy to build with, it’s the most efficient of materials and you can tailor it to fit right into that spot where you’d like to have an icebox. And if that’s not enough, it will look better than a professional job and be as modern as tomorrow, besides. All you need is a little plywood, some pieces of Celotex for insulation, a few yards of fiberglass boat cloth and a quart or two of plastic.

4 page(s)

$3.50
Build Your Own Fiberglass Refrigerator (7016)

Heres a project for the winter months when the boat is in storage—build a refrigerator.

Modern life being what it is, refrigeration is practically indispensable. There are two essential parts to a good refrigerator: the mechanical cooling system and a perfectly insulated box. There are many electrical refrigeration units on the market especially designed for use on boats, which run from either 6 or 12 volt batteries and there are a few which can be switched over to shoreside current when the boat is at her own berth. Several of these units are offered by manufacturers and they are also being shown in boat shows around the country. The refrigerator box you can build yourself and it will be better insulated than most home refrigerators if you use foam plastic insulation as directed in this piece. More important—you can tailor the box to the space allowable in your own galley and the cost will be small compared to buying a commercial refrigerator.

2 page(s)

$3.50
Leakproof Cockpit of Fiberglass, A (7017)

Are you tired of that leaky cockpit? Soggy ropes in a damp lazaret? Water dripping on the quarter berths? If you are, replace the old dog with a fiberglass cockpit.

It will be light and will provide more room below, yet be roomier on deck because it can be molded in one piece and suspended from the deck. A fiberglass cockpit is fairly easy to build and install; if you follow the plan outlined by the accompanying drawings you can channel the water through the built-in gutters into-the scuppers-in the cockpit well.

2 page(s)

$3.50
How to Build a Boat Landing on a Muddy Shore (7018)

Rot-proof fiberglass sandbags and logs of Styrofoam provide a solution.

Many boatmen do their boating in areas where facilities for landing are sometimes no more than a muddy marsh or a crumbling sand bank washed away by the river day by day. Most of these waterways never saw anything more than a canoe until the boat trailer came into general use. Alongside facilities for the new crop of boats are non-existent; they are generally too expensive for an individual to build if he uses conventional means to improve his waterfront area. I became literally bogged down in this problem not long ago when I spent a weekend with a friend at his hidden retreat. He had frontage on a lake, but we had to wade hip-deep in mud to get to the boat he anchored there. After we got aboard, carrying our clothes, we had to take a swim in deep water to clean up. And we bad to repeat this performance when we landed back at camp. Well, this was all right when I was a young lad of 30 or so, but now. . . We decided to try to find a solution. What we came up with was effective and cheap, so I think it fruitful to pass along to you.

2 page(s)

$3.50
Plywood Has Its Place (7020)

Like any other good boathuilding material, plywood must be understood to use it to the best advantage. For many applications, it’s a boon to the boat builder. To use it intelligently in marine service, take some of the practical tips suggested by the author in this informative article

Every once in a while a new product is introduced upon the market which is such a startling improvement over what is already available that at first it almost seems as if the ultimate had been reached. But even though this new material is highly acclaimed and at first appears to be the answer to many problems and is generally admitted to be an improvement, it isn’t long before you will find one group of users praising the new material to the sky while there will also be those who see nothing good about it and will condemn it to the limit. Plywood is not a new product but since there seems to be a sort of “for-and-against” attitude concerning the use of marine plywood, we are wondering if it has been overrated or if it is unpopular with some because it has been put to uses for which it is not fitted. Because marine plywood has so much to offer the amateur boatbuilder, per. haps it would be worth while to consider some of the various applications to which this material is put to see if it has been used properly as well as to consider some of the current objections regarding it.

4 page(s)

$3.50
Designing for Construction in Plywood (7021)

There came recently to our attention an unusual comment on a build-it-yourself boat design which has prompted the writer to give here the results of a year’s sporadic research in plywood development for boats.

The statement in question was to the effect that the bottom lines of a certain boat had not been altered except to adapt it to plywood construction; that is, apparently concave lines of cross section were straightened out from keel to chine and from chine to sheer. We have examined dozens of V-bottom designs for plywood adaptation and have seen but one in which the designer did not labor under the delusion that straight sections would accommodate a plywood bottom without strain. As a matter of fact, there is only one time when such a condition can exist and that is when section lines are parallel, or generating lines of a cylindric surface at right angles to the center plane of the boat. In such a case a deep-bottomed sail boat with easy lines may be developed which will be more or less orthodox, but this is an exception. Although we labored under the straight line section delusion for awhile, we soon disproved it, as you may do, by carving a half model of a stock V-bottomed runabout with the sections straightened out and then attempting to cover it with a plane surface (cardboard). When the carboard was forced to meet all points on chine and keel, it buckled badly; and even on the sides there was sufficient distortion to demonstrate that only a convex section of some nature would meet the conditions necessary for plywood covering. To determine the proper form for the accommodation of plywood covering we turned to the drawing board, and thus was evolved the design for Conendric.

4 page(s)

$3.50
Developing a Plywood Design (7022)

Moulded plywood has greatly affected the production-boat field, it is true. But there has been some over-optimism as to the application of the process to all types of boat construction.

The plywood mould is an expensive item, too costly for the small shops which can pattern and produce a bent plywood boat to compete with the production plants even though their sales are counted in the dozens instead of hundreds. Often the bent plywood boat answers the need of the buyer who wants something a little different from those available in stock boats. It is almost always ideal for the amateur who can turn out an acceptable piece of boatbuilding even when the conventionally planked boat baffles him completely. There is little question but that the field of the bent plywood boat has barely been tapped. Newer and better glues and methods of glueing are being used, both in the manufacture of the plywood itself and by builders in the construction assembly. By cutting darts into boat sides hollows can be worked into them which cannot be pulled into the bent sheet. Where bends are too great for the thickness of plywood desired it can be applied in double or even triple layers, glued together to form a structurally stronger member than the single sheet would have been. And designs are being adapted to the characteristics of bent plywood to produce boats which have their own unique advantages.

4 page(s)

$3.50
Designing a Sailboat to Use Plywood (7023)

Planking with plywood has opened a new field of marine design. It was soon found that adaptation of hulls to the bent plywood sheet evolved new designing methods.

Bent plywood design depends on judgement of the character of curved planes rather than on the conventional buttocks-waterlines-sections cross fairing method of arriving at the finished set of hull lines. Design and lofting of plywood, therefore, entails development methods not commonly used in conventional hull drawings. But when the characteristics of bent plywood are comprehended, the design of plywood hulls is found to be a simple procedure, and requires less drawing and lofting time than the conventional hull lines.

4 page(s)

$3.50
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