Data Sheets

Our Data and Plan Sheet series is made up of informative reference articles from the literature. For a modest price, Data Sheets contain information selected from our classic books or the periodical literature reprinted to provide specific information on a particular subject. Plan Sheets are for boat building projects and contain building plans. These items measure  8.5" x 11" and contain between 1 and 4 pages. Most of the Data Sheets and Plan sheets are illustrated.

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by Clarence E. Werback
Understanding stresses and curvatures of plywood in boat building.
$3.50
by Clarence E. Werback
Understanding stresses and curvatures of plywood in boat building.
$3.50
by Robert M. Steward
The hollow fin keel construction described here was designed for ease of building, lightness and strength.
$3.50
by Robert M. Steward
How to size pipe to build davits.
$3.50
by Charles G. MacGregor
A handy little packet suitable for a small outboard or air-cooled inboard engine.
$3.50
Detailed design information for designing and building centerboards and rudders
$3.50
by Charles G. MacGregor
The American skiff is probably the most popular type of small boat in this country today.
$3.50
by George L. Cary
Plotted curves for weights of average boats without engines or equipment.
$3.50
The results of a year's research ib plywood development for boats.
$3.50
Moulded plywood has greatly affected the production-boat field.
$3.50
Planking with plywood has opened a new field of marine design.
$3.50
by Edson I. Schock
When using sheet plywood for planking, you'll save labor if you plan on this type of hull.
$3.50
More About "Developable" Surfaces (Pub. No. 7047)
Clarence E. Werback/Understanding stresses and curvatures of plywood in boat building.

by Clarence E. Werback

During the past two or three years various articles have appeared discussing the methc of designing "developable" surfaces as applied to hull form.
The intent of this discussion is to acquaint those interested in this design principle with further possibilities of its application and procedure. At the outset we should like to say that so far as we know, C. P. Burgess presented the first paper explaining the principle and method of geometrical projection involved in the development of this type of hull lines. We wish also to acknowledge the great amount of research done by Bruce N. Crandall*, who has possibly expanded the possibilities of this design principle more than any other designer and at the moment is giving the Navy Department the benefit his skill. To those not familiar with the principle let it be said in simple terms that the surfaces of the sides and bottom forms of boats designed on the principle, are segments of either cones or cylinders or combinations of both. Surfaces so developed will be free of compound curvature and hull forms will be such as to permit the application of plywood in full lengths without buckling or the necessity of steaming. In the case of steel hulls the plating can be applied cold without furnacing or working. It can seen at once that a tremendous amount of labor is saved on hulls designed around this principle. In the use of plywood there is no dress down, no seams to caulk and no sanding. Priming, and even finish coats of paint, may be applied on both inner and outer surfaces before the plywood is fastened on. Also, since there are certain stresses built up in the plywood skin because of the curvature induced as it is warped around (which should be kept within minimum bending radius set up the plywood manufacturers), frames can be more widely spaced without affecting the overall strength, of the hull structure.

2 page(s)

$3.50
Developable Surfaces for Plywood Boats (Pub. No. 7051)
Clarence E. Werback/Understanding stresses and curvatures of plywood in boat building.

by Chas. P. Burgess

Laying out a hull so that the true surface of it can be readily determined.

The rapidly growing popularity of plywood and sheet metal for the construction of small boats and yachts makes the problem of designing developable bottom and sides one of timely interest to both professional and amateur yacht designers.    Strangely enough, it appears that very few designers, even among the professionals, know the solution to the problem, and yet it is quite simple, and can provide the amateur with a lot of fun when he knows how the trick is turned. All curved surfaces may be classified as "developable" or "undevelopable." The side of a cylinder is a familiar example of a developable surface, and a sphere an undevelopable one. A sheet of paper may be rolled into any form of developable surface, but it cannot be formed into a sphere or any other undevelopable surface without crinkling or stretching. It is generally supposed that a V-bottom boat with straight lines in all cross-sections is developable; but, a matter of fact, it is not strictly developable unless th angle of deadrise is constant throughout the length, though it may be near enough to true developability to permit forcing plywood into it. A better shape of bottom, and one which is strictly developable, can be designed with slightly convex sections forward, and with the angle of deadrise increasing towards the bow. A widespread and quite erroneous belief is that a developable surface cannot be curved in two direction at right angles to each other, e.g., longitudinally and transversely in a boat.    The fallacy of this belief may be seen at once by imagining two diagonal sections through a cylinder, intersecting one another at right angles. Both of these sections have curved intercepts with the surface of the cylinder. In fact, with the exception of lines parallel to the axis, all lines on the surface of a cylinder are curved; and yet a cylindrical surfae is indubitably developable.

2 page(s)

$3.50
Plywood Instead of Deadwood for Keels (Pub. No. 7063)
Robert M. Steward/The hollow fin keel construction described here was designed for ease of building, lightness and strength.

by Robert M. Steward

The hollow fin keel construction illustrated in the accompanying drawing was designed for the prevention of aching backs and blistered hands usually accumulated by amateur boat builders when working solid deadwood into shape. There is another, easier way out, and that is to make the deadwood slab-sided, but why muss up the water with such disregard of naval architects' experience and tank testing? The essentials of the hollow fin keel, which is especially adapted to hull construction of the bent keel type, can be explained briefly. It is made possible by the manufacture of the waterproof plywood. These sheets are made of Douglas fir, or Oregon pine, call it what you will. The outline of the fin is laid down on the mold loft, or living room floor, together with the waterlines through the fin and the outline of the ballast keel. After the ballast keel bolts and other deadwood bolts are drawn in the locations of the webs can be decided upon, the number of webs being more or less guessed at. After going through the operation of laying down the hull lines and sections it can be readily seen that a section through the boat can be drawn any place by simply drawing in a station line, picking up the half breadths, transferring them to the body plan, and drawing in the section. So don't skimp on the number of webs, because all one has to do to get one out is to draw a section where a web comes, deduct the thickness of the plywood planking, move the net shape onto a 3/4 or 7/8 inch board and slide it through a band saw. The plywood skin should be screwed to the webs and to pieces of oak forming the leading edge, the bottom of the fin abaft the keel, and the stern post, also to plain fillers on top of the keel and one bolted to the under side of the bent keel. The stern post will have the same cross-section from top to bottom and therefore can be gotten out on a circular saw. The other rabbeted pieces can probably be roughed out pretty well on a saw, too. It goes without saying that all joints and interior surfaces should be painted during assembly. Anyone with enough ingenuity to try this construction can very well work out the missing details himself. And how about filling up the spaces with cement? I am not advocating that all fin keels be built this way from now on, but do think that it might be tried on a small boat.

1 page(s)

$3.50
Chart for Selecting Size of Pipe Davits (Pub. No. 7704)
Robert M. Steward/ How to size pipe to build davits.

by Robert M. Steward

The number of davits required on the various types of small naval vessels is indeed remarkable. We were accustomed to davits on yachts for handling the dinghy and anchors, but a patrol boat or minesweeper has many times the need for them. Formerly forged from solid stock, we now find them predominantly made of steel pipe, generally galvanized, in order to save weight and for ease of manufacture, and we believe they will be used more extensively on yachts when the building of such craft is resumed. The accompanying chart has been utilized countless times for davits on vessels assigned to arduous duty at sea and no trouble from their use has been reported. However, it should be borne in mind that, although the chart includes up to eight inch, caution should be used when the larger sizes are indicated, due to the fact that stresses other than the direct load, such as that developed when a fair lead sheave is attached to the davit, or the eccentric pull on the hauling part of the tackle, complicate the stress analysis and must be taken into account. Therefore it is considered that very important davits, such as those for lifeboats, that are to be kept to the minimum of weight consistent with strength, are beyond the scope of this chart and must be carefully engineered separately. Besides, pipe does not always provide the most advantageous section.

2 page(s)

$3.50
Factotum--A Power Skiff (Pub. No. 7060)
Charles G. MacGregor/A handy little packet suitable for a small outboard or air-cooled inboard engine.

Designed by Charles G. MacGregor

LOA 15 ft. 6 in., BEAM 5 ft., draft 2 ft.

These plans show a 15'6" utility power boat, one of these handy little packets in which a small outboard or air-cooled inboard engine may be installed. This is not a speed boat in any sense of the word, therefore do not expect speeds in excess of 7 miles an hour, and do not use any power plant over 6 hp. It was designed as a utility tender for a large schooner yacht, and as such, is expected to perform a multiplicity of duties.    It is light enough to lift aboard and stow on deck, has good carrying capacity and therefore would be extremely useful around a summer camp.

2 page(s)

$3.50
Notes on Building Center-Boards & Rudders (Pub. No. 7711)
/ Detailed design information for designing and building centerboards and rudders

There are many ways to construct center-boards, trunks and rudders for sailing boats, and the details for any one particular boat are usually to be found on the plans which one is following. However, the principles are much the same in building all these more or less troublesome parts, so a few general comments should be of interest to the amateur boat builder.

3 page(s)

$3.50
Beaver--An All-Purpose Skiff (Pub. No. 7062)
Charles G. MacGregor/The American skiff is probably the most popular type of small boat in this country today.

11'8" All Purpose Sldff By Charles G: MacGregor

LOA 11' 8 in., BEAM 4 ft. 4 in., DRAFT (LEEBOARD DOWN) 1 ft. 6 in.

The American skiff is probably the most popular type of boat in this country today.    Many thousands are in use and they are to be found in almost every corner of the United States and Canada: These vary in construction and form from the simplest with flat bottom and straight vertical sides to the vee-bottom and flared sides or the beautifully built planked up models, now unfortunately seldom seen or built. They are our most numerous utility boat though most of them lack the all-around qualifications because of their absolute simplicity of form and build. A utility or all-purpose boat must serve in a wide variety of duties and perform them with the least amount of effort or power whether that power is delivered by oars, sail or motor. These qualifications are listed below: a; stron, b; light weight, c; low cost, d; low upkeep, e; simple and easy to build; f; easy to row with one or more aboard, g; sail well to windwrd in choppy water; h; have profvision for small outboard engine; j. suitable for small inboard engine.
In addition to all these qualifications it may easily be transported an a trailer, on top of a car or on the deck of a larger boat; be readily towed astern of an auxiliary or power cruiser without too much drag, and many other duties too numerous to mention here.

3 page(s)

$3.50
How Much Does She Weigh (Pub. No. 7857)
George L. Cary/Plotted curves for weights of average boats without engines or equipment.

by George L. Carey

This question is often asked. Only a naval architect can give the proper answer in most cases. In this curve sheet Mr. George L. Cary has plotted curves for weights of average boats without engines or equipment.

1 page(s)

$3.50
Designing for Construction in Plywood (Pub. No. 7021)
/ The results of a year's research ib plywood development for boats.

There came recently to our attention an unusual comment on a build-it-yourself boat design which has prompted the writer to give here the results of a year’s sporadic research in plywood development for boats.

The statement in question was to the effect that the bottom lines of a certain boat had not been altered except to adapt it to plywood construction; that is, apparently concave lines of cross section were straightened out from keel to chine and from chine to sheer. We have examined dozens of V-bottom designs for plywood adaptation and have seen but one in which the designer did not labor under the delusion that straight sections would accommodate a plywood bottom without strain. As a matter of fact, there is only one time when such a condition can exist and that is when section lines are parallel, or generating lines of a cylindric surface at right angles to the center plane of the boat. In such a case a deep-bottomed sail boat with easy lines may be developed which will be more or less orthodox, but this is an exception. Although we labored under the straight line section delusion for awhile, we soon disproved it, as you may do, by carving a half model of a stock V-bottomed runabout with the sections straightened out and then attempting to cover it with a plane surface (cardboard). When the carboard was forced to meet all points on chine and keel, it buckled badly; and even on the sides there was sufficient distortion to demonstrate that only a convex section of some nature would meet the conditions necessary for plywood covering. To determine the proper form for the accommodation of plywood covering we turned to the drawing board, and thus was evolved the design for Conendric.

4 page(s)

$3.50
Developing a Plywood Design (Pub. No. 7022)
/ Moulded plywood has greatly affected the production-boat field.

Moulded plywood has greatly affected the production-boat field, it is true. But there has been some over-optimism as to the application of the process to all types of boat construction.

The plywood mould is an expensive item, too costly for the small shops which can pattern and produce a bent plywood boat to compete with the production plants even though their sales are counted in the dozens instead of hundreds. Often the bent plywood boat answers the need of the buyer who wants something a little different from those available in stock boats. It is almost always ideal for the amateur who can turn out an acceptable piece of boatbuilding even when the conventionally planked boat baffles him completely. There is little question but that the field of the bent plywood boat has barely been tapped. Newer and better glues and methods of glueing are being used, both in the manufacture of the plywood itself and by builders in the construction assembly. By cutting darts into boat sides hollows can be worked into them which cannot be pulled into the bent sheet. Where bends are too great for the thickness of plywood desired it can be applied in double or even triple layers, glued together to form a structurally stronger member than the single sheet would have been. And designs are being adapted to the characteristics of bent plywood to produce boats which have their own unique advantages.

4 page(s)

$3.50
Designing a Sailboat to Use Plywood (Pub. No. 7023)
/ Planking with plywood has opened a new field of marine design.

Planking with plywood has opened a new field of marine design. It was soon found that adaptation of hulls to the bent plywood sheet evolved new designing methods.

Bent plywood design depends on judgement of the character of curved planes rather than on the conventional buttocks-waterlines-sections cross fairing method of arriving at the finished set of hull lines. Design and lofting of plywood, therefore, entails development methods not commonly used in conventional hull drawings. But when the characteristics of bent plywood are comprehended, the design of plywood hulls is found to be a simple procedure, and requires less drawing and lofting time than the conventional hull lines.

4 page(s)

$3.50
Developable-Surface Boats (Pub. No. 7035)
Edson I. Schock/When using sheet plywood for planking, you'll save labor if you plan on this type of hull.

by Edson I. Schock

When using sheet plywood for planking, you’ll save labor if you plan on this type of hull.

If you are planning to build a boat using sheet plywood for planking, your work will be made easier if you select a design having a developable-surface hull. This means a flat or V-bottom hull, with conical or cylindrical bottom and topsides. Either a cone or a cylinder may be developed, or laid out flat, on plywood or sheet metal, and the plank cut from this development put on the boat without twist. Plywood bends fairly easily in one direction only. If you try to bend it in two directions at the same time, it will resent this and resist your efforts. It may even crack. Let us consider what developable-surface boats look like. The simplest form is one having cylindrical surfaces for both sides and bottom, with the elements of the cylinder showing true length in the body plan or sections. Such a boat is shown in Fig. 1.

4 page(s)

$3.50
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