Data Sheets

Our Data and Plan Sheet series is made up of informative reference articles from the literature. For a modest price, Data Sheets contain information selected from our classic books or the periodical literature reprinted to provide specific information on a particular subject. Plan Sheets are for boat building projects and contain building plans. These items measure  8.5" x 11" and contain between 1 and 4 pages. Most of the Data Sheets and Plan sheets are illustrated.

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Double-Duty Cruise Tank (Pub. No. 7036)

by Gordon P. Manning

Expand your effective cruising range with this gasoline-storage unit that also acts as helmsman’s seat.

Most outboards today are still struggling along with the 6gal. gas tank that came with the motor. This allows you little over an hour’s cruising time—obviously not enough if any cruising distances are involved. As a result, the average outboarder gets himself one or two 5-gal. cans to hold a reserve supply, to permit him to increase his operating range. These cans, loose in a small boat, present a definite safety hazard. And transferring gasoline from can to tank is a risky business, even in calm water. So risky, in fact, that boating authorities insist that all cans and portable tanks be removed from the boat before refueling. Larger, built-in tanks are the only safe answer to this gas-supply problem for outboards of 15’ to 21’. Cruising or long-range tanks are now available in styles and sizes to fit any boat. With one of these as a basis, you have a good start toward-worryfree bqating. This article tells you how you can solve the gasoline-storage problem safely and at the same time make a useful helmsman’s seat with lockers. The tank goes below and the seat above, The seat itself may even be an adaptation of the existing one, to hold expenses down.

4 page(s)

$3.50
Floating Dock (Pub. No. 7037)

by Hi Sibley

Styrofoam blocks are the key to this snug offshore slip. There sure won’t be any more snooping around your boat if you make this.

By locating your dock a few yards offshore, you put your boat out of reach of inquisitive kids and meddlers. Four 2”-pipe posts driven into the bottom hold it in position better than mooring lines, and the iron brackets permit it to rise and fall with change in water levels.

2 page(s)

$3.50
It's Really Easy to Square-Stern Your Canoe (Pub. No. 7038)

by John Gartner

Square off the stern of your Canadian-type canoe to better accept an outboard motor.

Many boating enthusiasts like the traditional Indian watercraft, its silentness, its romance. But when the distance to be covered is great, they long for the back-saving advantages of a motor. Here is a way to fix a canoe so that it loses little of its accepted advantages and gains measurably in efficiency with a motor. Small outboards can be hung over the side of a canoe but at considerable loss of efficiency. If the craft’s stern is squared off, so that the power is applied directly at the rear, it becomes faster and far more maneuverable than with the power applied on the side.

2 page(s)

$3.50
Auxiliary Motor Mounts (Pub. No. 7039)

Three different types of outboard motor mounts to add to your sailboat.

A sailboat that is drifting helplessly may present a picturesque scene; but, to its occupants, it's of scant comfort to know that a becalmed wind might eventually stir again to return their craft speedily to home port. On the other hand, if a sudden gale forces a captain to drop his sails, it is most comforting to be able to rely on auxiliary power in order to navigate through the blast. By means of one of these special transom mounts, an outboard motor can be adapted to any 12- to 30-ft. cruiser or sailboat to serve as auxiliary power in case of a breakdown in the weather or the main power plant. Even if you have excellent sailing weather, you ll find it much easier to moor in crowded anchorage or to navigate through a twisting channel with the aid of a small outboard motor. The article illustrates three types of mounts, which adapt different-sized outboard motors to various transoms. The mounts can be quickly built from scrap materials usually found in the basement or junkyard. In case the shaft of your outboard motor is too short, motor manufacturers are prepared to supply motors with longer shafts just for this purpose.

2 page(s)

$3.50
Table and Companionway Steps (Pub. No. 7040)

by William D. Jackson

Want to dress up your cruiser? Here are two accessories you can build adapted to both cruisers and sailers.

2 page(s)

$3.50
Installing Built-in Fuel Tanks (Pub. No. 7041)

Here's how to extend the range of your power boat.

If you aleady own or are thinking of building one of the popular large outboard boats, powered with one of the new big engines, you may want to consider the advantages of built-in tanks. Extra capacity tanks will give you increased range and much more independence from gas docks. They are also considerably easier to fill. But even more important is the safety factor, since the larger tanks eliminate the need to transfer gas from one can to another during a long run. Any time gas is poured from one can to another in a boat there is an excellent chance that some of the explosive gas fumes will be trapped in the boat's bilge. If these ever ignite, you are liable to make unhappy headlines. For really good remote tank operation, outboard engines should be equipped with suction-type fuel pumps. The pressure system used on many engines works very successfully with 6-gal. portable cans, but has serious drawbacks when larger tanks are pressurized. If the fuel level is low in a 20-gal. tank, it may take half an hour to build enough pressure to get the boat in operation. So if your engine has a pressure fuel system, change it to a fuel pump, for reliable, trouble-free large tank operation. The changeover is simple to make and relatively inexpensive.

2 page(s)

$3.50
Up-Date Your Boat Trailer (Pub. No. 7042)

by Fred W. Goette III

There's no need to part with a tried-and-true boat trailer just because you've bought a new boat not even if it's a cat or trimaron. Here's how you can modify it to suit your boat and do away with wet-foot launchings at the same time

It's easy to envy the owner of a modern low-slung boat trailer as he launches his boat in minutes with hardly a splash. But the advantages of older trailers, such as good road clearance and tires that interchange with those on your car, can hardly be denied. You can have all of these features working for you at once by outfitting your trailer with up-to-date equipment that costs only $24 for a single-keel, 14-ft. boat. Or, if you ve bought a new multi-hull boat, you can custom fit your present trailer to it with a similar setup for each keel.

4 page(s)

$3.50
All Weather Boat Shed (Pub. No. 7043)

Build and store your boat in this dual-use structure.

Here is a boat storage shed that will not only provide a weatherproof place in which to build your boat, but will also serve as a floating or stationary boat house after you have completed that dream vessl. If you own waterfront property, the shed can be pulled ashore and your boat stored in it safe and dry during the inactive winter season. for this use it might be well to cover the side walls with inexpensive polyethylene film obtainable at lumber yards.

1 page(s)

$3.50
Stepped Aquaplane for Faster, Smoother Rides (Pub. No. 7044)

More fun behind your small runabout.

You'll get speedier rides and smoother handling using this aquaplane with the built-in step. The step construction reduces drag on the aquaplane just as it does on a racing hydroplane. Full effect of the step, however, is not realized until you reach a speed above 25 mph. But at speeds of 30 to 35 mph you will be conscious of a much softer ride than with the conventional type aquaplane. Cornering is the same as for a regular aquaplane—you must shift your weight and “dig in” to prevent skidding.

1 page(s)

$3.50
How to Make a Marine Railway (Pub. No. 7045)

by Hi Sibley

Here’s an effective and easily-constructed project for hauling that big boat out of the water for bottom repairs or cleaning. And it’s no chore to dismantle the setup since the track is made in 10-foot sections bolted together.

In Fig. A is the layout. The dotted lines show the craft approaching the car in shallow water. In fact the car is drawn in simultaneously with the boat until it rests firmly in the cradle. Two men at the winch can draw the boat up completely out of the water.

3 page(s)

$3.50
Build this Sailing Surfboard (Pub. No. 7046)

by Hi Sibley

Planing along close to the water on this sailing surfboard will give you the thrill of a lifetime
.

Here is a board that you can use for both surf riding and sailing. When the mast and rudder unit are removed the deck is absolutely clean. To remove the sailing gear is a matter of minutes. Just loosen the turnbuckle on the forestay, lift out the hook, tilt the mast back slightly, and take up the two side hooks. Next unscrew the bolt which serves as a pivot for the steering bar, and also the rudder post. A pin through the hub of one leeboard permits withdrawing the tube serving as pivot. All the gear can be stowed in small space. Even with leeboards and rudder in place, you can slide the board up on the beach without damage, as in the profile view, Fig. 1. Here also is the deck plan and dimensions of the sail. The sail is drawn taut by cords through grommets at peak and foot. Mast and boom slip into wide hems in the canvas.

3 page(s)

$3.50
Skippy (Pub. No. 7049)

by Charles G. MacGregor

LOA 11 ft. 8 in., BEAM 5 ft., DRAFT BOARD DOWN, 3 ft., SAIL AREA 72 sq. ft., WEIGHT about 160 lbs.

Following is a list of the material required to build this boat. Many of the smaller items such as seat cleats, etc., are not included in this list but they can be made from scraps. Also where 1 inch thickness is specified for floors it is intended that 7/8 inch or better should be used, as much as can be obtained from the 1 inch rough stock after it is dressed. If preferred, Philippine mahogany or African mahogany may be used in all members. Do not however use oak on a glued watertight seam.

4 page(s)

$3.50
Mackerel--A 16-Foot Family Type Outboard Runabout (Pub. No. 7050)

Designed by Charles G. MacGregor

LOA 15 ft. 8 in., BEAM 4 ft. 3 in., DEPTH 1 ft. 11 in.

This is a design of a popular type of small family runabout, using any one of the small outboard motors from about 6 hp, up to 10 hp. This little craft will carry as many as eight passengers, and if not overloaded will attain speeds up to 15    m.p.h., depending on the power used. By making slight alterations to the hull-structure a small air-cooled inboard motor can be used. Waterproof plywood is used throughout where possible and feasible. Panels can be obtained -in 16' lengths without a splice or butt, and this is recommended. However, if these panels are not readily available in your locality, do not hesitate to use shorter lengths and make a butt.

2 page(s)

$3.50
Pioneer (Pub. No. 7052)

Designed by Charles MacGregor

LOA 15 ft., 6 in., BEAM, 5 ft. 7 1/2 in., Draft 1 ft. 4 in.

The possibilities of the trailer-cruiser as a companion to the automobile in opening up more extensive cruising vistas to the man of average means will be more and more apparent as time goes on. The remarkably enthusiastic reception given to resin bonded plywood boats by the boating public in the last few years will go far toward making this possible. We can now build stronger, lighter and in many ways better boats than was possible by the old-fashioned conventional method. We have at hand new material and methods of building small boats, scorned by some old time builders but readily accepted and adopted by the more progressive and younger element of far-seeing builders. Further than this, the construction can be made so simple as to make it possible far the home builder to construct his own boat without any previous experience as a boat builder. It is possible for him to butld a small floating home, one that can be stored in a garage, hauled overland on a trailer to practically any part of the continent over our splendid system of highways; then from a chosen point launch this little cruiser and explore rivers, and-bays hitherto inaccessible. We will then have for such summer cruising the coast of Maine, the St. Lawrence River, the Thousand Islands, Georgian Bay Bay and its 30,000 islands (a cruising paradise) Muskoka Lakes, the Minnesota lakes, Mississippi River, Florida and the inland waterways route and the new huge man-made lakes formed by the dam projects in the west. It is with all this in mind that I have prepared this design. It is one that can be built by an owner-builder and that will he capable of carrying him safely on many happy and delightful cruises in unexplored territory. This boat which I have chosen to call Pioneer is built of waterproof plywood where practicable. As an open launch it is roomy, strong, yet light enough to be handled on a trailer. It will be very suitable for use as a fishing boat or for a party of about six persona for day cruising. The form is such that it can be easily and economically driven at speeds up to seven miles an hour with either a small outboard motor or one of the many air-cooled or water-cooled inboard motors now on the market at very moderate prices.

4 page(s)

$3.50
Pup--A 12-Foot Cat (Pub. No. 7053)

Designed by William F. Crosby

LOA 12 ft., BEAM 5 ft., DRAFT (board down) 3 ft. 6", SAIL AREA 60 sq. ft.

The plan for the little boat presented herewith makes use of plywood throughout except for the keel, chine pieces and clamps. The sides may each be made in one piece and the bottom may be composed of two pieces, one for each side. The fact that it is only 1/4 inch thick need cause no concern because this is actually stronger than the material usually used in boats of this type. The skin of the boat is also reinforced by five sawn plywood frames and intermediate frames and stringers that leave but little of the surface unsupported. Before going any further, we wish to point out the fact that ordinary plywood is not suitable and will not stand up when used this way. The material must be Resin Bonded Waterproof plywood in which the bonding agent between the plys is phenolformaldehyde. It is highly important to use this type material for ordinary plywoods will buckle and separate in no time. The little boat is 12 feet long and 5 feet wide. She is a vee-bottom, having a very slight vee, and is rigged as a Marconi cat. The only real weight in connection with the hull is in the center-board and it is highly important to follow the specified material and size closely. Iron, not being as heavy as bronze, should not be used unless it is at least 1/16 inch thicker. It will be noted that there is no external keel on this hull. Instead the two bottom pieces of plywood come right down to the centerline where they are mitred together. For the entire length of the boat an inside keel is used the under side of which is veed downward to the exact angle that the bottom pieces form. A small molding may be used to cover the seam in the bottom pieces, but it is not necessary.

4 page(s)

$3.50
15-Foot Keel Knockabout--Breeze, The (Pub. No. 7054)

Designed by Charles G. MacGregor

LOA 15 ft. 8 in., BEAM 5 ft., DRAFT 2 ft. 6 in., SAIL AREA 111 sq. ft.

Here is presented the design of a plywood fin keel sloop.

This boat is intended for the more ambitious builder in plywood. She is suitable for day sailing and racing; can be easily transported by trailer, and if necessary the fin keel may be removed in a few minutes by backing out the keel bolts. The material specified is intended for salt water use, and substitutions are not recommended without competent advice. The form of the hull is such that no difficulty will be experienced in bending the "planking." The twist at the forefoot of the usual vee bottom form has been eliminated by adopting the skiff form of bow adapted to the conical stem. This conical stem not only adds to the appearance of the boat but permits a certain amount of flare and eliminates the necessity of twisting the forward end of the topside planking into a vertical plane which occurs when the ordinary stem is used. The bottom is slightly vee form. It had been suggested that an arc bottom be used similar to the Star class hull. This would be excellent but it is practical only within certain definite limitations of panel length and width. For instance a 3/8" panel 42" wide and 25' long may be given a transverse arc of 21/2" and a longitudinal arc or upsweep of about 5" at each end. Beyond this point the plywood will crimp along the edges. The arc form is therefore impractical in a boat of the size and type of Breeze. The vee bottom was adopted in preference to a flat bottom. It is a little more difficult to build but its advantages in this type of boat are well worth the extra trouble.

4 page(s)

$3.50
Small Box Masts Can be Made of Plywood (Pub. No. 7055)

bv William F. Crosbv

A light, hollow mast makes an ideal spar for any boat. Naturally, every pound that is added above the waterline will become a handicap to stability and generally speaking the boat with the lightest mast is the best. The mast shown herewith has been designed` to be made of eighth inch waterproof plywood. Its strength is ample for the sail area that it would carry. The mast is eighteen feet four inches in length and has been designed to suit the plywood boat Pup. It is a square mast instead of the round type specified. Roughly figured, this mast, if built to the required size and of the materials specified, will weigh about sixteen pounds. A rectangular box-shaped mast of usual constrnction of the same dimensions would weigh about seventeen pounds. A solid mast of the same dimensions and material would weigh about twenty-five pounds. The mast shown would, therefore, weigh just about half what the solid mast would come to.

2 page(s)

$3.50
Crawfish--A Tunnel Stern Motorboat (Pub. No. 7056)

Designed by Wifliam F. Crosby

LOA 15 ft. 6 in., BEAM 4 ft. 8 in., DRAFT 4 ft. 1/2 in.

The little boat shown here is designed for protected waters where the bottom is close to the top. The draft figure includes the rudder and propeller.
As you can easily see she is a tunnel stern boat equipped with a little marine engine not to exceed 4 hp, at the outside. The engine shown is only 21/2 hp. She is not built for speed as no tunnel stern boat can be driven at high speed. Being a flat bottom type, she is not meant to go to sea in either. She would make an ideal fishing boat for some shallow pond or lake. She should weigh a little over 600 pounds complete with engine, propeller, etc. The weights of engine, tanks, seats, etc., should be placed in the hull as shown in order to have her trim properly. The tunnel for the propeller is large enough to take any wheel up to twelve inches in diameter--which is more than ample. The angle up to the top of the propeller and down to the stern should be as shown. Do not make the mistake of running the tunnel directly out to the stern even with the highest point of the tunnel. If you do, it will not pick up the water and your propeller will be revolving mostly in air. The construction offers wide possibilities in choice of materials: The materials specified are those most suited. Others may be used but don't try to use a soft wood such as redwood and expect fastenings to stay in it. Plywood; (waterproof) may be used almost throughout with the exception of frames and the bed pieces to which the engine is actually, mounted. If you use waterproof plywood, you can reduce the thickness by about one-half from the material specified as it is at least 40 per cent stronger than ordinary wood.

4 page(s)

$3.50
Two Boats for the Unskilled Amateur (Pub. No. 7057)

by J. A. Baresch

Although we have presented several elaborate designs, there is a constant demand for very simple boats that almost anyone can build with the minimum amount of tools available and little skill. Both boats here shown are of plywood construction. One is a ten foot fishing punt suitable for fishermen and hunters, a type widely used especially in shallow waters. The drawing is self explanatory. The expanded (true length), sides shown will cut construction time considerably. The twelve foot rowboat, drawings of which are shown here also, will require a little more skill, but can be mastered by a beginner with a bit of study. As rowboats are greatly in demand, this little fellow should fill the bill. The builder must bear in mind that only waterproof marine -plywood so certified by the manufacturer is to be used.

2 page(s)

$3.50
Jacana--A Skiff for Racing or Day Sailing (Pub. No. 7058)

Designed by Charles G. MacGregor

LOA 14 ft. 6 in., BEAM 4' 8 in., DRAFT C.B. 3 ft., SAIL AREA 96 sq. ft.

Jacana is a fine looking, modern boat of nice form, being stable, fast and relatiuely easily built and she has no hard nips anywhere in her and was laid out, of course, especially to take waterproof plywood planking. The fixed draft of the boat wlaen the rudder is in place (to the bottom of the rudder, in other words), is about 14 inches.    She carries, 96 square feet of sail which is plenty because she is a light boat. It looks like more because the plan is so well balanced: The sail is divided up as follows: mainsail 71 square feet jib 25 square feet. It is passible to carry a larger overlapping jib which would be the same hoist as the working jib but 7 feet 9 inches along the foot. Your sailmaker can lay it out from those dimensions if you show him this sail plan.

4 page(s)

$3.50
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