Data Sheets

Our Data and Plan Sheet series is made up of informative reference articles from the literature. For a modest price, Data Sheets contain information selected from our classic books or the periodical literature reprinted to provide specific information on a particular subject. Plan Sheets are for boat building projects and contain building plans. These items measure  8.5" x 11" and contain between 1 and 4 pages. Most of the Data Sheets and Plan sheets are illustrated.

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Eskimo--A 16-Foot All-Plywood Kayak (Pub. No. 7059)

Designed by Charles 0. MacGregor

LOA 15 ft., 10 1/2 in., BEAM 1 ft., 11 in., DEPTH 8 in.

The Kayak is a native of the Arctic, and that one most familiar to us is the small hunting type used by the Greenland Eskimos.
This little craft, as used by the Greenlanders, is about 16 feet long, 16 inches wide and very shallow, little more than 7 inches where the paddler sits. They are very light in weight, but these little fellows perform many daring stunts with them, the most amusing and spectacular being that of turning completely over, under, and up again-smiling. Most of our domestic kayaks are built of canvas stretched over a light frame. This is quite satisfactory and inexpensive, but if one should have a spill and the kayak fills with water, it is generally so wracked and twisted as to be almost beyond repair, particularly if it has been tossed around much. In response to numerous requests we have developed an all-plywood kayak which will be stronger than a canvas hull, will be unsinkable and stand more punishment. It is a little heavier; but this is only a slight disadvantage: The plywood used should be one of the resin-bonded variety for marine use. One manufacturer can supply this in 16 foot panels without a splice.    Generally this costs a few cents more per square foot compared to the standard panel.

3 page(s)

3.13€
Skua--An 8-Foot All Plywood Outboard Skimmer (Pub. No. 7061)

Designed by Charles G. MacGregor

LOA 7 ft. 9 in., BEAM 3 ft. 10 in.

To those who love the thrills of speed on water we submit here a small outboard skimmer which if carefully built will give her owner a great deal of pleasure. There is a splendid choice of suitable outboard engines developing 3 to 30 hp. Most of these motors run efficiently at speeds between 3,500 and 4,000 r.p.m. and as high as 5,000. It is not necessary to use a steering wheel but it is a great convenience. Keep the tiller lines well clear of the open cockpit so that they will not be in the way when turning from cranking to steering position. The seat should be arranged to suit your own needs or eliminated

4 page(s)

3.13€
Whale-Tail Hunting Boat (Pub. No. 7064)

by Hi Sibley

LOA 96",BEAM 34", DRAFT ABOUT 6"

A novel method of propulsion enables this craft to glide silently through shallow as well as deep water with little effort. It is called Whale Tail because the fin operates in a horizontal plane. just as Moby Dick’s did. Cnstruction of the punt, or pram if you will, is more or less conventionaL All details of the propelling mechanism are illustrated: the fin, use stainless steel or other sheet metal thin enough to give a little but not so thin as to stay bent. Shaft A serves as steering post and shaft B as an operating link. Yokes on the ends can be picked up in an auto-parts yard. Note how the tubing for the pivoting bolts is welded or brazed to the fin. To dismantle the unit for transportation, unscrew pipe cap on bottom of Shaft A and loosen wing nuts on slotted pillow block. The punt then can be transported on the car’s top. All moving parts should be carefully fitted to prevent rattling.

2 page(s)

3.13€
Automotive Engines go to Sea (Pub. No. 7065)

by Roger Lehman

Most marine engines are simply automotive products converted. You can save money by making the change-over yourself.

In the recent tremendous expansion of the boating industry, one of the fastest-growing branches is that of marine conversions. This is evidenced by the ever-increasing number of boats which, each year, employ converted automotive engines for marine power. This growth stems mainly from the fact that the boating public is becoming increasingly aware of the savings and advantages offered by conversion equipment. Most of today’s boat owners are acquainted with the fact that marine engines are conversions of mass-produced automotive blocks. If a brand-new automotive engine is used in the conversion, savings up to as much as 40 per cent may be expected when compared against prices of marine engines of cornparable power. Greatest savings (and by far the most popular) are gained through the use of a used or rebuilt engine. Engines from late model cars are readily obtainable at most reasonable prices from local auto wreckers. Engines offered by such firms will vary widely in condition and mileage.

2 page(s)

3.13€
How to Build a Quahogger: A Narragansett Bay Type (Pub. No. 7066)

by Michael P. Smith

An extremely useful and practical shoal draft working utility.

Recently we hired a contractor to repair the concrete piers on one of our bridges here in Narragansett Bay. Among the items of equipment he used were three outboard skiffs each powered with a 40 hp engine. Boxy in appearance, high-sided, with little or no flare, a straight vertical stem, vertical transom, flat bottom with little or no longitudinal rocker, as wide at the transom as they were amidships, they did not leave an impression of a goodlooking boat. Details at the gunwales were different but other than this they were nearly alike. (See drawings.) “Quahoggers” is what the contractor called them. My respect for these boats began almost immediately. We used them to haul material and ferry men back and forth between the beach and job site. They proved to be extremely fast and were excellent weight carriers. On calm days they could get up on a plane even when loaded. On rough days we carried seven men each trip with safety. I became interested in these boats and searched for plans with the idea of building one, but apparently plans for a “Quahogger” have never been published. I then started on a private research venture to learn more about these boats and to draw up a set of plans. I visited the waterfronts in Bristol, Warren, East Greenwich, Tiverton, and Newport. In each of these places I found “Quahoggers” being used as work boats, fishing boats, tongers, lobster boats and as small family yachts. I talked to owners and knowledgeable persons about them. No one knew anything about plans. One inquiry earned the reply that “Joe S. in Bristol will build you one, $250 unpainted.” A visit to Joe’s back yard showed that he had no plans but that he did have a building jig, and that he would build me a boat. Where did he get the jig? “Oh, my father made it years ago.” The “Quahogger” is the beginning of a type. Except for the ordinary flat-bottomed skiff, it has no forebearers and did not evolve from any earlier models. It is, I believe, the forerunner of another local type which is a very good looking skiff and that is the “Dutch Harbor Skiff.” From what I can gather, Quahoggers were first built in the Narragansett Bay area after the advent of the outboard engine, the weight of the engine aft dictating the
need for the very wide transom. these boats were first built by men in the shellfish trade. The boat satisfied their requirements for a simple, practical, seaworthy, heavy load carrying and economical skiff. Basically, present-day Quahoggers are the same as those first built. The Quahog skiff is a local type that doesn’t get much publicity. They are so common here on the Bay that a potential buyer would look and then pass them off as being too ordinary and too simple. Surprising as it may seem, however, they are fast, stable, economical and practical. One man who knows says, “they are the best platform available for pulling’ pots and tongin’, and they are fast; they’ve won every work boat race ever held in Newport.” Another expert says, “ . . . one of the nicest boats in the Bay for the purpose for which they are built.” They are that they can be driven right up on the beach for loading and unloading. Our workmen boarded and left over the bow onto a sandy beach without getting their feet wet, and the boats have enough power to back clear of the beach with a full load. Most of the work boats have only two seats, one in the bow and one in the stern. The rest of the boat is wide open for plenty of working space and accommodation for such gear as pots, pot haulers, rakes, tongs and baskets. The interior of all boats varied with their use, all being quite functional. Building a “Quahogger” is quite simple—you just set up the forms and wrap the planks around them.

4 page(s)

3.13€
How to Build Peanut (Pub. No. 7701)

by W.F. Crosby

Complete instructions for building a lap-streak dinghy. May be built 9, 10 or 11 feet long. Will work out well with a sail.

The construction of a small, light round-bottom dinghy such as Peanut is one that calls for some skill in the use of wood working tools, a degree of patience and the ability to read and understand the plans furnished herewith. While not as easy to build as the ordinary flat-bottom type of dinghy, the lapstreak round-bottom job has considerably more class and is always in demand by yachtsmen.

3 page(s)

3.13€
How to Lengthen Your Boat (Pub. No. 7702)

You can lengthen your old boat inexpensively and quickly, and you’ll gain the comfort a big boat affords.

Certain types of sail and power craft are perfectly adaptable to being lengthened. Another three or four feet in length added on adds not only to the appearance of the craft, but also considerable deck space. In many cases, lengthening solves the problem of building a new and longer boat, thus eliminating the job of starting from the keel up. The work of lengthening your craft might seem a major operation, but it is a comparatively minor one alongside the task of building an entire hull. It is just the thing to do these days, when a larger boat is needed and when goodly quantities of lumber and fittings are practically unavailable, because of defense priorities. Craft without an overhang or a fantail—those with blunt sterns from the waterline up—can be lengthened to good advantage. Building a fantail on such types is safe and practicable, and does not appreciably disturb the sail and rig. The increased length aft enables you to set up a permanent backstay, so that yott can come about without slackening or hauling-in sidestays.

4 page(s)

3.13€
Add a Cabin to your Boat (Pub. No. 7703)

You can save yourself a lot of grief from the weather by adding a permanent cabin to your runabout for very little money.

4 page(s), 1 plate(s)

3.13€
How to Make a Real Ship's Wheel (Pub. No. 7705)

by Hi Sibley and Don Selchow

One of these handsome yacht wheels is for marine use; the other makes an attractive wall decoration. Both are well designed and require only a lathe and scroll saw for their construction. Mahogany Pilot Wheel For Wall. Note: It would be a good idea to build the decorative version first to work out the "kinks" before tackling the real thing and perhaps wasting expensive teak and/or mahogany. The photo on the right shows the decorative wheel, which will lend an attractive boaty atmosphere to a room, especially if the marine motif is carried out in lamps, ash trays, etc. Spokes are lathe-turned, and the rim is made up of 60 degree segments cut on the scroll saw, then assembled with casein glue and brass screws. Finish with stain, filler and two or three coats of top grade spar varnish.
Substantial Yacht's Wheel. This wheel on the left is the real thing, and calculated to give long, hard service. The rim is of hardwood, built up in sections of 60 degrees each, as in the decorative wheel. Spokes are lathe-turned from 3/4xl-in. stock. Wheel is assembled with casein glue and Everdur screws. Brass flanges clamp spokes to spool and serve as a hub for shaft.

2 page(s)

3.13€
Make Your Own Hole Saws of Any Diameter (Pub. No. 7708)

by Alvin Youngquist

The home made saws illustrated for cutting holes up to 12" in diameter were developed for cutting lightening and ventilating holes in boat frames, but can also be used for a variety of purposes. The cutters shown cut through 3/8" plywood; however, by turning the stock over and cutting from the other side, it will cut through 3/4" stock. The saws can be used in a hand drill press or an electric hand drill, or electric drill press. The saws are easy to make, and save a great deal of time if there are a number of holes to be cut.

1 page(s)

3.13€
Easy Method of Making A Grooved Spar, An (Pub. No. 7709)

The making of tunneled or grooved spars usually requires special tools. The method described here enables the amateur with a limited number of tools in his workshop to make professional looking spars. Laminated construction sis used for both strength and simplicity.

1 page(s)

3.13€
How to Lay Out Spars for a Marconi Rig (Pub. No. 7710)

by Robert M. Steward

Masts are calculated as columns, booms as beams, therefore the load and the length of the longest unsupported span are factors determining the size of the maximum section. The calculated section is required only at the middle of that span, where the greatest load occurs, and this point on a mast is half way from the deck to jib stay, and at the mid-length of a boom. Therefore, a spar can be tapered down smaller each side of the largest section, but to save work most economical builders make masts of constant section from the step to the point described above and then taper to the top, where the saving in weight does the most good. Booms, being shorter and simpler, should always be shaped to both ends.

2 page(s)

3.13€
Balance of Sailing Boats, The (Pub. No. 7712)

A Rough Method of Determining Proper Location of the Sails in Small Boats

The location of the mast (or masts) in a sailing boat, and the consequent disposition of the areas of sail, must be arranged to suit certain conditions or the boat will very likely not perform properly under canvas. The sail cannot be placed anywhere in the boat. It must be placed so that the center of its area bears a certain relationship to the center of the underwater plane of the hull. When the sail plan is placed in its proper relationship to the underwater body of the boat,  the boat is said to be properly "balanced" and it is to be expected that the boat will sail on her course, on all points of sailing, without the need of much corrective pulling one way or the other on the part of the rudder. A perfectly balanced boat should need no rudder at all, except for alteration of the direction of her progress--in other words, in the perfectly balanced boat one should be able, after settling the boat on the desired course, to take the rudder off entirely, and she should keep on this course, provided the wind were steady and the sea smooth, indefinitely.

2 page(s)

3.13€
Historical Cat Boat Rigs and Lines (Pub. No. 7713)

3 pp., illus. with lines and rigs of 12 catboats.

3.13€
Your Propeller (Pub. No. 7714)

by C.H. Van Dusen

An article which describes in the simplest terms the underlying principles of propellers, why they work, slip, and they way they are chosen.

In reality it is very simple to understand. If you screw a nut on a bolt, the distance that the nut travels in each complete revolution is called the pitch. Get this clearly. Now, in the propeller, we have exactly the same thing and the pitch of the propeller (usually given in inches) is the distance that the propeller would travel through the water, in the ahead direction, if it could be screwed through the fluid as the nut is screwed onto the bolt. Since the propeller is turning in water though, it will be at once apparent that it is not possible for the propeller to travel forward or backward without some loss due to the slippage of the water off the blades. The water is not solid enough, in other words. Therefore, we come to a rule which, for the sake of argument, we will term Rule 1: The difference between the actual speed of the boat and the actual pitch speed of the propeller is called “slip.” It is usually expressed in percentages

2 page(s)

3.13€
Curve Sheet of Rudder Areas (Pub. No. 7715)

by George L. Cary

The area of the rudder must be proportionate to the area of the lateral plane, and in these curves the author has approximated the lateral plane for various classes.

1 page(s)

3.13€
Measuring Propeller Pitch (Pub. No. 7717)

Two methods for measuring the pitch of your own propeller.

1 page(s)

3.13€
Method of Determining Balance in Sailing Hulls, A (Pub. No. 7718)

The "Metacentric Shelf" system and how it works.

by Douglas H. C. Birt

The so-called Metacentric Shelf is one of the few systems in yacht design which may claim to have evolved by truly scientific methods. It has developed from step by step experiments first with model yachts and later with the real things. Some years ago Engineer Rear Admiral A. Turner, R.N., originator of the metacentric shelf system of hull balance, designed and built a model he called “Principia,” which embodied the first elements of the theory of balance. Following this came a chain of such experiments carried out by various people under Admiral Turner’s guidance. Gradually the principle of balance was formulated on the evidence of experimental success and failure and amplified by mathematical proof. Today the metacentric shelf has lifted yacht design from the category of a rather nebulous art, and placed it on a scientific basis. It is now possible to ensure, with a fair degree of certainty, in the design stage, that a yacht will be well mannered and docile—will have that peculiar quality known as balance.

4 page(s)

3.13€
How to Make a Race Starting Clock (Pub. No. 7721)

by Jack Ryan

The problem of providing a good readable starting clock is of major concern to regatta committees. Often enough a local racing group has to borrow a clock from some neighboring community, unaware of the fact that construction of such equipment is fairly simple and that it is a decided convenience to have one locally. While it is possible to build a satisfactory starting clock that is operated by a phonograph motor or other mechanical device, ranking officials in the two national inboard and outboard boating associations are uniform in their agreement that a simple, nianually operated clock is best. The reasons for this opinion, based on racing events conducted over a period of many years, are that a clock must stand much weather abuse which is not particularly helpful to a mechanical drive, and the “works” have a habit of going temperamental at the crucial moment.

1 page(s)

3.13€
Rigging Adjustable Fenders on Tracks (Pub. No. 7722)

If you dock your craft in a number of different harbors, or cruise or sail on tidal waters, adjusting boat fenders to the proper height and position to protect the sides of your hull can be a problem. This project offers a method of rigging boat fenders so that they can be quickly adjusted for any kind of dock. The system is particularly helpful on tidal waters where high dock posts or pilings are common, but this system is a big advantage anywhere a boat has to dock against posts because horizontally slung boat fenders just do not offer sufficient protection when there is a heavy chop. In such situations, fender boards are the best solution. But fender boards must be rigged in the proper location to span dock posts, and a boat just does not have enough cleats or fender hooks to meet every situation.

3 page(s)

3.13€
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