Data Sheets

Our Data and Plan Sheet series is made up of informative reference articles from the literature. For a modest price, Data Sheets contain information selected from our classic books or the periodical literature reprinted to provide specific information on a particular subject. Plan Sheets are for boat building projects and contain building plans. These items measure  8.5" x 11" and contain between 1 and 4 pages. Most of the Data Sheets and Plan sheets are illustrated.

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Bottom Painting (Pub. No. 7769)

Painting a boat’s bottom is one chore that cannot be avoided by the saltwater boater. A neglected hull bottom inevitably gets worse, making the boat slower in the water, and the cost of the inevitable maintenance job skyrockets. Before getting into painting a boat’s bottom, it is useful to know how bottom, or anti-fouling, paint works.

3 page(s)

$3.50
Boot-Tops and Boat Stripes (Pub. No. 7770)

A boottop is the traditional stripe at a craft’s waterline. It is used to indicate an area between the waterlines of a ship when it is fully loaded and unloaded. On pleasure craft, however, the boottop is mostly decorative and varies in its location. Some boats have a decorative stripe just below their rail. In fact, there is no law that says you cannot paint a stripe up the mast if you wish. A popular way to apply a stripe along a hull today is not to paint it at all, but to do it with tape made for that purpose. Paint manufacturers, however, still make boottop paint and many boat owners still prefer to paint their own stripes.

4 page(s)

$3.50
Rooftop Ventilator from a Plastic Bowl, A (Pub. No. 7771)

If your boat requires additional ventilation, here is a simple way to make a ventilator that mounts on a hatch or cabin top. It provides good ventilation in rainy weather, yet keeps out rain and spray. For this project, you will require a piece of 4 inch diameter plastic pipe, approximately 7 to 8 inches in length. You also will need a small can of solvent cement for the type of plastic pipe you obtain. In addition, the project calls for two fittings: a coupling section for the pipe that is about 4 inches long, and an end cap. The only other items needed besides a few small screws is a plastic or aluminum kitchen bowl with a flat lip around its edge. The bowl should be about 6 inches in height. To make and install a rainproof ventilator, follow these steps.

3 page(s)

$3.50
Building a Shadow Pelorus and Compensating Compass (Pub. No. 7772)

Compass compensating aboard a boat is performed by running reciprocal courses. With the compass on a book that was rotated 180 degrees on the table, you were, in effect, running reciprocal courses indoors. To run a reciprocal course on the water, you reverse your boat’s heading by 180 degrees so that if you were originally heading north, your reciprocal course will be south. Here's how to use a home-made Shadow Pelorus to help you do this accurately.

4 page(s)

$3.50
Build a Permanent Gunwale-Mount Trolling Ctr. (Pub. No. 7773)

For Captains whose boats serve no other purpose than sport fishing, and whose craft have no railings along with gunwales near the stern, the permanently mounted trolling center—a 2 x 8 inch plank across the beam of the boat equipped with downriggers, or sideriggers and rod holders—may be desirable. To construct and install the permanent trolling center, follow these steps.

4 page(s)

$3.50
Build a Removeable Gunwale-Mount Trolling Ctr. (Pub. No. 7774)

If a boat has no railings over the gunwales near the stern and a permanent trolling center—-a plank on which downriggers and rod holders are mounted—-is not desired, one that is easily removed from the gunwales can be installed. To construct and install a removable gunwale-mount trolling center, follow these steps.

3 page(s)

$3.50
Build a Removeable Railing-Mount Trolling Ctr. (Pub. No. 7775)

For boats equipped with tubular metal railings at the stern that would prevent installation of a gunwale-mount trolling center—-a plank on which downriggers and rod holders are secured-—boat owners can elect to mount a removable trolling center that is clamped to the metal railings. Before proceeding with this project, however, make certain that the fastenings for the boat railings are firmly bolted with backing blocks, especially if they are attached to fiberglass surfaces. The strain placed on a trolling center by a downrigger weight that is snagged on a rock ledge or a sunken wreck could pull the trolling center and railings from the mountings unless they are properly secured. To construct and install a removable metal railing-mount trolling center, follow these steps

2 page(s)

$3.50
Build a Removeable Wooden Trolling Ctr. (Pub. No. 7776)

On a boat with expensive teak railings, one would naturally be reluctant to drill holes to temporarily install a trolling center—-a plank across the stern on which downriggers and rod holders are mounted. And, boat owners may hesitate to use metal brackets to secure the trolling center because of possible damage to the wooden railing. Here is a method that employs wood clamping blocks that is much better for this type of situation. To construct and install a removable wooden railing-mount trolling center, follow these steps.

2 page(s)

$3.50
Build a Fishing Speed Guage (Pub. No. 7777)

Correct trolling speed can often be a critical factor in fishing success. The speed at which a lure travels through the water has much to do with the action of the particular lure and the response from a fish. Gamefish are usually predators that capture their food by pursuing it. There are times when a fast-moving lure will trigger a strike and times when it is difficult to throttle a fishing craft down slow enough for the presentation of lure preferred by the fish under prevailing conditions. By experimenting with lures known to be productive and trolling them at different speeds, the captain can determine the boat speed that works best for his craft. Maintaining this speed can present some problems, however, especially if you must cope with strong wind and currents. While the revolutions per minute (rpm) of the engine may remain constant, the boat—and lure being trolled—will travel faster heading downwind than when moving upwind. The same applies when the boat is going with a current rather than against it. A boat may have a speedometer or rpm gauge but the accuracy of these instruments at slow, trolling speeds is not very reliable. So, there is a need for a fishing speed gauge to guide the skipper in maintaining the proper trolling speed once it has been determined under all conditions. To construct a fishing speed gauge, follow these steps.

4 page(s)

$3.50
Build a Fish-Cleaning Table (Pub. No. 7778)

One of the least enjoyable parts of a fishing day is cleaning the catch afterward, especially an all-day outing with everyone tired. A shower, refreshing drink, and a good dinner are much preferred to fish-cleaning chores. In addition, too much of a delay in cleaning fish can detract from their palatability as table fare. Unlike game such as venison and grouse, fish does not improve with aging. So, there is a double advantage in cleaning the catch soon after the fish are caught. A fish-cleaning table that can be set up quickly, takes little room in the boat, and is easy to maintain is a desirable item on the well-equipped fishing machine. Such a table is not provided even as an option by most boat manufacturers but this should not deter the boat owner because the construction of such a table is not a difficult project.

3 page(s)

$3.50
Build a Fishing-Rod Stowage Rack (Pub. No. 7779)

When the call, “fish on!” sounds out, there is a scramble to retrieve lines and clear the decks of fishing rods that might hamper the landing of a hooked fish, especially during those critical moments when the angler and net man are attempting to coordinate their actions in bringing the fish to net. Usually, there is not enough time to stow the fishing rods that have been removed from rod holders into rod storage boxes. Instead, they are propped against the center console or some other place—even placed on the cockpit floor where they are liable to be damaged. The same problem exists when the skipper decides that fishing action is better a few miles away and issues the order to “haul lines!” for the run to the new fishing grounds. Again, there is need for some kind of quick rod stowage to avoid clutter. One solution to the storage problem is a vertical rod rack with quick-release clips. Such a rack can be tailored to available cockpit space. And, it is not difficult to construct.

3 page(s)

$3.50
Installing a Surface Thermometer (Pub. No. 7780)

The relation of water temperature to successful fishing is one of the newer developments in the sport of angling. Traditionally, good fishing conditions have been linked with local seasonal phenomena, such as dogwood in bloom (when the bass fishing gets good in the South); or, lilac leaves the size of a squirrel’s ear (the time to go fishing for white bass in Wisconsin). Recognizing the limitations of such adages as fishing forecasts, anglers have been turning to a more scientific approach, relating water temperatures with favorable fishing conditions, and seeking out the temperatures that prove to be most productive. This project shows you how to install a remote-reading surface thermometer to take advantage of this knowledge.

4 page(s)

$3.50
Wire Rope Splicing (Pub. No. 7787)

by Francis G. Wachs

Splicing wire rope is a subject that is not readily understood, and even after one has grasped the idea of how it is done there still is a certain amount of practice required, depending on the skill of the individual, to make a good splice. But in my opinion a clear understanding of how it should be done is more than half the battle.

3 page(s)

$3.50
Compensating the Compass at Home (Pub. No. 7788)

No one is perfect and that applies to compass readings as well as to the people who take them. Often, compass error is not so much the fault of the instrument as it is the “company” it keeps—tachometer, radio, and depth sounder, to say nothing of a screwdriver, pliers, and other ferrous metal objects carelessly placed nearby. These and other things can cause deviation errors because they cause the compass to stray from a true magnetic reading. A classic example of this type of error, or deviation, is the deer hunter who checked his hand compass without laying his rifle aside. At the end of the day, he discovered he had been traveling in a circle. Electrical wiring near a compass also can create problems, especially if it is a single wire with direct current flowing through it. Twisting single wire circuits around one another will cancel out these interfering magnetic fields and help avoid this type of compass error. Everyone knows that north is at the North Pole, geographically speaking. Navigators refer to this direction as true north. But there also is the magnetic North Pole. A compass in good working condition will indicate the magnetic North Pole, unless there are shipboard magnetic disturbances to cause it to deviate. Before you install the compass on your boat, you can check its operation indoors.

2 page(s)

$3.50
Pup (Pub. No. 7789)

by William F. Crosby

A small, neat, plywood catboat that can serve triple duty as a rowboat, outboard tender or as a fine sailer.

The plan for the little boat presented herewith makes use of plywood throughout except for the keel, chine pieces and clamps. The sides may each be made in one piece and the bottom may be composed of two pieces, one for each side. The skin of the boat is also reinforced by five sawed plywood frames and intermediate frames and stringers that leave but little of the surface unsupported.

4 page(s)

$3.50
Electric Remote Helmsman, An (Pub. No. 7790)

By Rolfe F. Schell

Remote-control steering lets you go up forward to pilot or scout for fish without giving up the helm.

What better use could there be for a salvaged convertible-top power unit than to provide an electrically-powered, remote steering control for your boat? Although hydraulic and electro-hydraulic units are available, the electric-powered units used on Chrysler products are the easiest to install. In addition to one of these, you’ll need a couple of heavy-duty relays of the same voltage as tice motor, a turnbuckle that extends from 12 to 18 in., an eye bolt, a few scraps of lumber, and a single-pole, double-throw switch.

2 page(s)

$3.50
Moth Class Racing Skimmer (Pub. No. 7792)

Designed by William F. Crosby

This simple little skimmer is about as easy a boat to build as anyone could ask for. There is all straight work in her—with no steambending, or any severe twists to the planking or any other parts. The Moth boats are not one-design boats and the majority of them are rounded, or partly rounded, bottom construction. But no hull form is specified in the rules and this easy-to-build modified vee-bottom that you see here is acceptable and far easier to construct than any other.

3 page(s)

$3.50
Meteor Class Knockabout (Pub. No. 7793)

Designed by Charles D. Mower

This is a fast sailer originally designed as a one-design class for a well-known eastern yacht club and a good many were built. It is a vee-bottomed boat suitable for two or three when racing and the same number when just knocking around. The boat is quite stiff and fast and handles nicely. It is a little wet when slogging to windward in a chop but any small boat is, more or less

2 page(s)

$3.50
Swampscott Racing Dory (Pub. No. 7794)

Designed by Charles D. Mower

The sailing dory, properly designed, makes as fine a boat as anyone could wish. The so-called “Swampscott” style—that is, with rounded sides—makes the better and more stable boat as the common Banks fishing dory has little stability under sail unless heavily loaded. Here we have plans of one of the famous Massachusetts racing dories that were so popular a number of years ago and are still sailed in some sections. They are not as stylish as they once were but they make very fast boats and are lively to sail. This particular boat is fairly narrow and is quite easy to drive but she is not suitable for a family of six who wish to go out for a quiet drift around on a Saturday afternoon.

3 page(s)

$3.50
Yawl Spray, The (Lines Only) (Pub. No. 7795)

by C. Andrade, Jr.

“I did not know the center of effort in her sails, except as it hit me in practice at sea, nor did I care a rope yarn about it. Mathematical calculations however are all right in a good boat, and Spray could have stood them. She was easily balanced and easily kept in trim.” With these words Captain Joshua Slocum dismisses the technique of Spray’s design. Considering the unparalleled performances of this little boat, it is remarkable that no one has attempted an analysis of her lines and sail plan.

2 page(s)

$3.50
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