Data Sheets

Our Data and Plan Sheet series is made up of informative reference articles from the literature. For a modest price, Data Sheets contain information selected from our classic books or the periodical literature reprinted to provide specific information on a particular subject. Plan Sheets are for boat building projects and contain building plans. These items measure  8.5" x 11" and contain between 1 and 4 pages. Most of the Data Sheets and Plan sheets are illustrated.

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Sandspur, A Garvey (Pub. No. 7796)

by Gidge Gandy

This slightly refined garvey, of approximately 16 feet overall length, has a beam of 3 feet at the bows, 5 feet at midsection and 3 feet 6 inches at the transom. The draft is approximately 4 inches. Her sides are 16 inches from deck to bottom and they flare 6 inches, which gives her a bottom of 4 feet 6 inches breadth at the midsection. Although the old garvies carried the conventional gaff cat rig, I prefer the sprit leg-o’-mutton sail once used on the Mosquito and Cricket boats of Atlantic City. No stay or shrouds are used with such a rig and the butt of the mast is soaped or greased so it will turn and allow the sail to pull the slide to leeward. The forward end of the sprit is supported by an outhaul which leads to a cleat at the after end of the centerboard trunk, permitting adjustment of the draft of the sail at any time.

2 page(s)

$3.50
12 foot Rowboat, A (Pub. No. 7800)

The hull is built bottom side up on a "building board", the top edge of which is shaped to conform to the keelson curveture dimensioned in the sheet plan.

2 page(s)

$3.50
Susan (Pub. No. 7802)

by Robert M. Steward

This easily propelled 11-ft. flat-bottom rowboat requires little boat building know-how to construct.

2 page(s)

$3.50
Pootzy (Pub. No. 7803)

by Al Mason

This 6-ft. 6-in. dinghy fills the need for a small, substantial, easily stored and handled boat.

This dinghy is only six feet six inches long by thirty-eight inches wide and will be built quite light for ease of handling when stowing on deck. Complete with all equipment except oars, Pootzy should not weigh much more than fifty-five pounds, which is about double that of a one-man rubber life raft which carries two people. This little dinghy can carry two and it is to be noted that the oarsman seat is in the shape of a tee, so that with two locations for oarlocks his position can be varied to suit, depending on one or two in the dinghy.

4 page(s)

$3.50
Combination Rowing, Sailing and Outboard Boat (Pub. No. 7804)

Designed by F.W. Goeller

Here is a handsome, heavy duty service boat that, properly built, will give years of service, and is well adapted to rowing, sailing or outboard use. She will take the largest outboards one would care to handle over her stern and she is designed not to squat at the stern. She will carry a big load and is not light. She is a heavy boat, built with all the trimmings that used to be seen in the old-time heavy yacht gigs.

3 page(s)

$3.50
Whaleboat (Lines Only) (Pub. No. 7805)

Lines taken off by William H. Hand, Jr.

The New Bedford Whaleboat, in her time launched on all the oceans of the world, probably shows the maximum development reached in building small boats that were to be propelled by oars or sails. The men who manned them were interested in two things besides the first condition of seaworthiness: speed and silence. Lightness of construction was a prime factor in these craft. They were maneuvered entirely by manpower, lowered in the falls and hoisted again without the aid of such modern gear as power winches and the quick response needed during an attack could not be had in a heavy boat. The 28-footer shown in the accompanying lines weighed not much over 1,000 pounds.

1 page(s)

$3.50
Glouchester Fisherman's Dory (Pub. No. 7806)

The most universally used small boat for ocean work is without doubt the fisherman’s dory. At the same time, probably not one of these boats is built from plans, in the ordinary sense. They are built by men who were brought up in the business, who learned from experience—and the men who taught them as beginners—how to do the job. The true dory, as developed by the fishermen of the New England Coast, is ideally suited for her work, but she was developed in the boat yard by trial and error, not on the drafting board of a naval architect. Consequently it is not possible to give a complete set of lines for construction purposes—they don’t exist. The lines shown herewith were taken off a dory on a fishing schooner lying in South Brooklyn, where many of the New England boats put in. The scantling dimensions were taken from a dory at Fulton Market, New York.

2 page(s)

$3.50
N.J. Seabright Skiff (Lines Only) (Pub. No. 7807)

Lines of Clinker-built Craft 18 ft. to 30 ft. overall

For landings on the open seacoast, such as the beaches of New Jersey or the southern shore of Long Island, the type known as the Seabright or New Jersey skiff was developed several years ago. The design was taken over by fishermen, and as is the case with many boats built for local use and with suitability for hard service as the main consideration, no real design was ever made. The lines shown here are not construction plans and cannot be used as such unless more work is put on them. They do, however, show the general contours of an especially seaworthy type that proved its usefulness under the hard conditions for which the boats were built. The lines were taken off an actual Seabright skiff by the late naval architect, Roger M. Haddock.

1 page(s)

$3.50
Half-Pint--A small simplified sea sled (Pub. No. 7808)

A little plywood and a lawn-mower engine are all you need to build "Half Pint".

Plywood-preferably the waterproof kind, a small amount of miscellaneous stock and a tiny gasoline motor is all you need to make "Half Pint.” The original, capable of carrying three persons, was quite a sensation at Balboa bay, Calif., where even the old boat builders expressed genuine interest. Built in a garage, it was taken 50 miles for its first dip and has never developed a leak. This little sea sled can be easily carried on your car, and fishermen and tourists will find it ideal for use on remote lakes having no boating facilities. It is only 9 ft. long and so light that two boys can easily carry it. This boat is suitable for the use of any small gasoline engine of the lawon-mower type, air-cooled by a fan in the flywheel. The 1/2-hp. engine which was selected, is exceptionally satisfactory because the gas tank is in the base and as it is a self-contained unit throughout.

3 page(s)

$3.50
Fun at the Beach with a Bicycle Boat (Pub. No. 7809)

Buoyancy and speed are two features of this bicycle boat which was built for vacationists at a lake near Chicago and used a whole season. It consists of two pontoons and an old bicycle frame, held centrally above and between the former. Propulsion is obtained by the use of a ring-and-pinion gear, bolted to the pedal sprocket, and a small three—blade propeller connected to the gears by a suitable shafting.

4 page(s)

$3.50
Feathercraft--A paddling Pontoon (Pub. No. 7810)

Propelled half by swimming and half by paddling, these featherweight pontoons will provide plenty of sport at any beach.

1 page(s)

$3.50
Land Boat, The (Pub. No. 7811)

At the time of the great French war a British frigate that was on blockade duty off the coast near Quieberon, stood too far in to reconnoitre, and being caught by a calm and heavy swell went on a reef and was totally wrecked. The officers and crew escaped to the shore and were made prisoners by the enemy’s coast guard. The French custom was to send all seamen taken as far inland as possible so they might not be retaken or escape to their fleets, and the officers and crew of this frigate were shipped far into the interior of the country. Away from the sea, a captive in an inland town the captain of the frigate cast about for some form of amusement, and struck upon the happy idea of building a landboat, upon which to sail the French highways. The boat was built, and though a heavy and clumsy contrivarice proved a success. Since then in many countries land yachts have been built, but they have been all makeshift craft, of misfit materials and cannot have been either very fast or good handlers. There was one built to sail on a railroad track, which, if the owner didn’t lie, made forty miles an hour. The one whose plan is here given was designed by Mr. Ashley and as will be readily seen is an adaptation of his iceboat to land locomotion.

2 page(s)

$3.50
How to Build a Diving Raft (Pub. No. 7812)

With the summer swimming season here again, people who have an opportunity to do so despite war conditions are again making plans for boating, diving and water life. Nothing adds more to water sports fun than a good raft, where “the gang” can get together and lie under “Old Sol” and absorb ultraviolet rays, or have a floating picnic, or spin yarns. To serve these merry ends, this inexpensive raft was constructed. Anyone who knows a hammer from a saw can build it. No fancy materials are needed. It can be built of scrap pieces of lumber easily obtained.

1 page(s)

$3.50
Wimpy--A paddle Wheel Duck Boat (Pub. No. 7813)

Shoal draft and silent.

This light and stable duck boat is designed for the greatest convenience to the hunter, who propells the craft with the hands and steers with his feet while his gun is instantly at hand in a rack on the gunwhale. As the propelling mechanism is all inboard, it is possible to make a blind of shrubbery around the gunwhale, an achievement not possible with a rowboat or canoe which depend upon oars for movement. With all the bearings carefully fitted to eliminate any play, and the paddle wheel completely housed, the boat will move as silently as a light canoe. Constructed of this material, staunchly braced, it is conveniently hauled on a trailer and very easily launched.

3 page(s)

$3.50
Keeping an Old Deck in Good Shape (Pub. No. 7814)

Nowhere about a boat does age or neglect show as quickly as in the condition of the deck and cabin top, while nothing spoils her appearance or detracts from a boat’s value more than a cracked canvas deck or a poorly cared for wooden one with leaking open seams. Keeping any deck in shape is a problem. A canvassed deck or cabin top kept painted with the same high gloss deck enamel which looked so well when you bought your boat will invariably develop minute cracks or checks within three years time. No amount of subsequent sanding and painting will entirely obliterate these; indeed as time goes on and the paint film becomes thicker the cracks will grow deeper, reaching down into the canvas itself and in many cases causing leaks that will make either patching or complete replacement necessary.

4 page(s)

$3.50
Install Power in your Canoe (Pub. No. 7815)

Once you’ve experienced the delight of skimming sweetly over the water in an inboard-powered canoe, you’ll never want to pick up a paddle again. And even if you get a kick out of plying the paddle, you can cover a lot more territory with a given amount of effort if there’s a smooth little inboard engine to bring you back. The arrangement shown is light in weight, doesn’t occupy much space, and best of all, it’s relatively inexpensive.

2 page(s)

$3.50
Build a Real Salt-Water Tackle Box (Pub. No. 7816)

The shiny metal tackle boxes sold in stores are fine for the fresh—water fisherman—but for the salt—water fan, nix! They’d rust out in no time at all, and even then a chap wouldn’t want one, for the plug compartments are made to hold small fresh-water plugs, not the big ones used to tempt stripers. Since nothing else is available, most salties just dump their gear into whatever they can find in the way of a canvas bag at an Army-Navy store. We did it that way too—until we got sick and tired of spending half our time selecting what we wanted from a tangled mess of triple gang-hooks, leaders, spinners, and what-not. Desperation drove us to making a real salt-water tackle box. This box has more uses than a ten-dollar bill. It has a drawer for small items, a compartmented plug drawer, and a large storage drawer for such items as reels, hand lines, and similar bulky equipment. The handle doubles in brass as a gaff—so after years of fumbling for that pesky item, you’ll now know where to grab for it in an instant. The top of the box makes a handy bench for working on tackle, baiting up, or serving coffee. The box is so sturdily made that it can serve as a swell seat during those long hours of waiting for a bite on beach or dock. Being made of wood, it won’t rust; and if it should fall overboard it’ll float, saving you from having to buy a new outfit. If well-painted, the wood won’t be affected by water.

4 page(s)

$3.50
Sport--A V-Bottom, Air-Cooled, Inboard in Plywood (Pub. No. 7818)

Sport is a V-bottomed inboard ideally designed for fishing on bays, lakes or streams. The boat is relatively fast and holds four persons comfortably. The air-cooled motor can be from 21/2 to 6 hp.

4 page(s)

$3.50
Tramp--A 15-Ft. Knockabout in Plywood (Pub. No. 7819)

Any sailboat fancier will like “Tramp,” the trim, 15-ft. knockabout that’s so easy to build in plywood.

2 page(s)

$3.50
3-Section Rowboat Fits on Your Car (Pub. No. 7821)

When the three sections are taken apart and nested, this 12-ft. rowboat occupies a space only 6½ ft. long, and by virtue of its thin plywood construction is so light that one man can easily stow it on top of his car, using a suitable cradle to hold it. The boat is designed along standard lines, and construction differs only in the use of ¾-in, plywood for sides and bottom. In fact, it is built up as a single-unit rowboat, and then sawed between the two double bulkheads to form the three sections.

3 page(s)

$3.50
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