Data Sheets

Our Data and Plan Sheet series is made up of informative reference articles from the literature. For a modest price, Data Sheets contain information selected from our classic books or the periodical literature reprinted to provide specific information on a particular subject. Plan Sheets are for boat building projects and contain building plans. These items measure  8.5" x 11" and contain between 1 and 4 pages. Most of the Data Sheets and Plan sheets are illustrated.

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Skimmer--A Sturdy Plywood Kayak (Pub. No. 7822)

This kayak is staunch and seaworthy because it’s built of waterproof plywood over a conventional frame. Sides are vertical and only 6 in. high from the bottom edge of the chine to the top edge of the sheer batten, but this gives enough freeboard to keep off moderately rough water.

2 page(s)

$3.50
Make Your Own Paddles (Pub. No. 7825)

by Wm. C.B. Richards

You can replace the lost or broken paddle for your kayak or canoe with one or both of the types described here. Length of single paddle (Figs. 1 and 2) should be the same as your height. Make any change of length in shaft when you draw profile and edge patterns on pattern paper or cardboard. Trace or paste on wood and cut on band saw, watching the edge cut for squareness. Draw knife and spokeshave will knock off corners to an octagon, then to round or elliptical shape, and to rib effect along blade. A small convex sole plane will be useful in making slight concavity in blade to develop rib. Each line flows into another for a well turned and balanced paddle, very quick on the recovery stroke. Scrape and sand; use straight varnish for both priming and finishing coats.

2 page(s)

$3.50
Safe Moorings for the Boat Afloat and How to Build (Pub. No. 7826)

by William D. Jackson, N.A.

Every boat, regardless of how small or inexpensive it is, deserves a home or safe mooring of some kind where it may be protected from the elements. This does not have to be an elaborate structure nor need unusual precautions taken to insure safety of boats afloat. By making simple preparations, using easily acquired materials and a little effort and ingenuity, anyone can produce safe mooring equipment which will protect hulls afloat or ashore, depending upon your particular boat and location.

3 page(s)

$3.50
Demountable Cabin for Open Runabouts (Pub. No. 7827)

This raising and lowering top made of plywood and canvas will give your open boat many of the advantages of a small cabin cruiser and still can be easily removed whenever wished. Lowered for ordinary running the sides rest on the deck or gunwales making the entire structure so low it will not catch the wind, the light weight of the materials of which it is made together with this lowness, avoiding any tendency toward top-heaviness. Blankets and air mattresses, a box with food and galley supplies, spare clothes and odd gear in dunriage bags—everything you need for cruising—can be kept dry, and on long runs in damp or cold weather the idle member of the crew can crawl beneath for a snooze or smoke out of the wind or rain. At anchor or pulled up close to the beach the top is raised and its canvas sides tied down to give sitting up headroom.

4 page(s)

$3.50
Accessories for Your Boat (Pub. No. 7831)

Illustrations of a number of commonly used pieces of equipment, all inexpensively carved, cast or otherwise fabricated.

There is no reason why priorities and defense program shortages should affect the finishing up of your boat, for while it is true that certain items of marine hardware have become more expensive or hard to purchase, the average small-craft builder can make all the fittings, etc., that he will require, right in his own workshop. They will be as serviceable and long lasting as standard "store" accessories, though not quite as fancy, and will give you the satisfaction of knowing that your own handiwork is represented in your boat, down to the last detail. This article describes and illustrates a number of commonly used pieces of equipment, all easily and inexpensively carved, cast or otherwise fabricated.
Take a look at this other Data Sheet while you are at it! Make Your Own Sailboat Fittings

4 page(s)

$3.50
Foam Boots (Pub. No. 7832)

by Charles Bell

Build these seagoing boots and have fun learning to walk on water.

Swimmers, using these gadgets, can play many games on the water and they are handy for walking around your boat, tending lines and walking ashore, too; of course you have to learn to walk on ‘em. They are easy to build and cost very little. It will take some practice to learn to walk on these foam boots. Start out wearing a bathing suit because you’ll have many falls, but the trick can be mastered!

4 page(s)

$3.50
Aquacycle (Pub. No. 7833)

by Charles Bell

Convert that old bicycle into an amphibious craft for fun on both land and water.

This vehicle can be ridden on the beach and can be run right out on the water and back again. The two pontoons, immersed four inches, will support 480 pounds, so that two boys can have fun at the same time. This is primarily a vehicle for swimmers, but you can ride it wearing clothes although fenders are necessary for this and shorts are recommended because your feet will go into the water when pedaling. Aquacycle is simple to build and requires a minimum of tools; a few wrenches, a screw driver, a hammer, a hack saw and a paint brush will suffice.

4 page(s)

$3.50
Aquascooter-a Sailing Surfboard (Pub. No. 7834)

"Aquascooter" is an evolution of the "paddleboard," now so popular on beaches everywhere.

4 page(s)

$3.50
Sail Planning for the Amateur (Pub. No. 7835)

Whether you own a rowboat, a canoe, or motorboat, it can be made to sail. Even the most ancient records of boats show that sailing was an art that went hand in hand with that of boatbuildling. The first of man’s craft carried sails as an auxiliary to their oars and used them only when the wind blew in the direction in which the skipper wished to go. Galley slaves chained to their oars in the ancient Roman galleys paid homage to Boreas, the god of winds, because his aid meant a rest from their weary labors.

4 page(s)

$3.50
Its Easy to Make Your Own Sails (Pub. No. 7836)

by J. Julius Fanta

Sailmaking isn’t a difficult craft. For the cost of materials alone you can fit your boat with a suit of well-cut sails, by following these simple sailmaking rules.

2 page(s)

$3.50
Make Your Own Sailboat Fittings (Pub. No. 7837)

by George E. Basich

Generally, the first department in which the average sailboat builder thinks he can economize, is in the brass fittings. He comes to this conclusion after a hasty perusal of a boat supply house manual. By the time his boat is ready for fittings, his construction budget has shrunk considerably. It is therefore no occasion for wonderment that so many well-built boats are floated with c1umsy, ugly, dull accessories instead of the more conventional marine fixtures. We, too, faced this same problem but our boat was far too beautiful to be trimmed with any but the brightest brass. We decided to make our own.
Take a look at this other Data Sheet while you are at it! Accessories for your Boat

2 page(s)

$3.50
Elements of Navigation for the Beginner (Pub. No. 7839)

by John Farr

Generally when the subject of navigation is broached to most small boat owners, they conjure a vision of complicated instruments, complicated tables and a picture of the navigator as a super-human mathematician to whom Einstein is a rank amateur. There need be no fear on the subject of higher education being necessary to understand how to get around on the sea and know at all times just where you are, when you consider the fact that very few of the captains in command of the world’s steamers today had any higher than a high school education. The most complicated problem in navigation uses mathematics no higher than trigonometry, and most of the problems can be worked with simple addition and subtraction. In fact, all the problems necessary for small boat navigation may be solved by the latter method.

4 page(s)

$3.50
Skippy--A 11-ft 8 inch Plywood Sailboat (Pub. No. 7840)

by George Muir

A plywood sailboat 11 feet 8 inches long

2 page(s)

$3.50
Anchoring Small Craft (Pub. No. 7841)

by William D. Jackson

You'll spend more time aboard your boat and enjoy anchoring wherever you wish with properly selected, low-cost ground tackle and the know-how of quick, safe anchoring.

If you are an average small-boat fan, your present boat is roomier, more comfortably equipped, and better looking than the one you might have owned five or ten years ago—all of which leads to your having more fun just being aboard and puts less emphasis on high-speed performance. You’ve probably been thinking about spending a night camping on your small boat and perhaps you’ve already taken a short cruise in the evening just to anchor and have dinner aboard, have an over-the-side swim, or do a little fishing. And, if you’re a skin diver or scuba fan, you know that you get most of your enjoyment from your boat after you’ve reached your destination and the boat is anchored. These are all reasons why you should give considerable thought to your method of anchoring and to your ground tackle, most of which wasn’t necessary back when a boat was just something to ride over the water. Although present-day anchors are more sophisticated and versatile than the concrete block on a rope that you used years ago, you can still outfit your runabout, small cruiser, or houseboat with ground tackle, depending somewhat on your selection of anchors and line and their intended use, for little money.

4 page(s)

$3.50
Sailing Dinghy--Snowbird (Pub. No. 7844)

Designed by Charles D. Mower.

Snow Bird is a smart sailing dinghy of a type similar to those used in “Frostbite” racing during the winter season in eastern clubs. In fact she was designed to the rules of a certain class a few years ago but the classification no longer exists. She is a practical boat, will carry a good load under oars, tows well, is light to hoist aboard and can be used with the smaller, lighter outboards of not over 3 hp. She is the perfect all-around yacht tender, and makes a handsome boat. The round-bottomed clinker built construction is difficult for the amateur but it makes the strongest light boat one can build.

2 page(s)

$3.50
Vee Bottom Center Board Cat (Pub. No. 7845)

Designed by Edson B. Schock

LOA 11 ft. 111/4 in., BEAM 4 ft. 11 in., DRAFT OF HULL 45/8 in., SAIL AREA 95 sq. Ft.

Here is a little boat that will really sail, is easy to build and is a good looking little craft. She is the perfect one-design racing boat for a crew of one but could be sailed with two. Her rig is simplicity itself and is very efficient and she is quite lively under canvas. The moderate deadrise, or vee of the bottom and the forward rake of the stem make for easy planking. A stem that rakes forward calls for less twist in the forward planks as they are naturally bowed out to meet the stem line when they reach the forward sections.

2 page(s)

$3.50
Simple Little Sailing Skiff, A (Pub. No. 7846)

Designed by L.J. Gorenflo

The average sailing skiff is a poor performer but this little packet here skitters along pretty well and having a good-sized efficient dagger type center-board goes to windward well for her kind. She sails best with one but can carry two well enough. She is designed to be sailed with the helmsman sitting on the bottom aft. The boat is very simple to build and with the drawings here, and bill of material, anyone could build one. In building this boat you set up the moulds shown, as well as stem and transom (or stern board), and plank her up. After she is planked the frames are put in and the moulds removed. This is standard rowboat practice.

2 page(s)

$3.50
No Trailer Needed for This Light Garvey (Pub. No. 7848)

by Hi Sibley

Built in halves, this Barnegat Bay sneaker-type craft is easily hoisted up on the car-top rack, and by virtue of its rectangular design will accommodate more load than the conventional skiff. Construction is much easier too. General over-all dimensions are given, with nose construction and a sectional view showing the beveled rails on the forward half that fit over the stern half and prevent it from slipping sideways.

2 page(s)

$3.50
How to Build a Duckboat (Pub. No. 7849)

by Edson I. Schock

Sharp all over, including both ends, is this he-man’s rugged duckboat. She is designed for building by the man who is interested more in hunting than in boatbuilding and hence is simplicity itself, using standard woods

Assuming that the owner of this craft will be more interested in duck shooting than in boatbuilding, she has been designed to be as simple as possible to build, yet to produce a boat that will have good stability and will row reasonably well.

4 page(s)

$3.50
Easy-to-Build Pier, An (Pub. No. 7850)

by Hi Sibley

No pile driver is needed to build this inexpensive pier with its high-and-low-tide float, as a sturdy concrete base supports one end of the telephone pole “backbone” and the wooden outer support can be floated in place and set up in a sandy bottom by a couple of swimmers. Length of the telephone pole depends on slope of the beach.

2 page(s)

$3.50
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