Data Sheets

Our Data and Plan Sheet series is made up of informative reference articles from the literature. For a modest price, Data Sheets contain information selected from our classic books or the periodical literature reprinted to provide specific information on a particular subject. Plan Sheets are for boat building projects and contain building plans. These items measure  8.5" x 11" and contain between 1 and 4 pages. Most of the Data Sheets and Plan sheets are illustrated.

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How to Build Water Skis (Pub. No. 7851)

by Hi Sibley

All steps for making the skis are shown on these two pages.

2 page(s)

$3.50
12' Skiff Specially Designed for an Outboard, A (Pub. No. 7852)

This boat is convenient and useful for rough work, or it may be used as a tender, while on account of its flat keelless bottom and almost straight run it can be easily driven by an outboard motor. It is a fine weather boat very suitable for shallow water and is light enough to be readily hauled up and down on beaches.

2 page(s)

$3.50
Building a 13-Foot Skiff (Pub. No. 7853)

While this skiff will carry three persons easily and safely, it was primarily designed for the person who likes to go out alone and ride the waves when the ordinary has to stay in. The designer built one for himself, used it on Lake Michigan, and found it exceptionally satisfactory in every way. For her size she is extremely seaworthy, and a wonderful surf boat--she has repeatedly come in through the surf when boats twice her size would not tackle it.

2 page(s)

$3.50
Building a 19-Foot Tunnel-Stern Boat (Pub. No. 7854)

The following boat has been used on the Mississippi River for two seasons and has been very satisfactory. She was designed especially for river use and draws only twelve inches of water. She is a flat-bottomed boat, but when she is in the water this is not noticeable, and, with her long front deck, is a very classy-looking craft. The cockpit is large and the lockers have ample room in them to stow everything that is necessary. The engine, being under the front deck, is out of the way, with no danger of engine trouble from rain or spray; there is also lots of room for engine supplies, making it possible to keep the cockpit and lockers clean. She is easy to build, even the tunnel, as shown, being very simple. Any one who can saw a board or drive a nail can build her.

3 page(s)

$3.50
Building a 151/2-Foot Useful Sharpie for Power (Pub. No. 7855)

Two-in-one is a practical little boat intended for all-around service. She is a motor boat in every sense of the word and, as shown, fitted with sail and centerboard, makes an ideal craft for the man with the summer cottage or the chap who enjoys short party sails and fishing trips.

4 page(s)

$3.50
Serviceable Small Boat, A (Pub. No. 7856)

by E.G. Monk

All large boats need tenders and the punt described can be easily and quickly built at low cost.

This 9 foot 9 inch by 3 foot 9 inch punt was built last spring for use as a dingy for a cruiser, and it has proven very satisfactory and serviceable. It is about the cheapest and simplest boat that can be built, the total cost of lumber, paint, and all other materials being very low. It took but a day and a half to build and was all done with hand tools. Short cheap pieces of lumber can be used for the bottom, seats, and ribs, which is a feature that keeps its cost down. The boat is very easy to row and tow and is a good boat to beach on account of the shape of the forward end. It will carry four or five passengers nicely and although light will stand plenty of hard usage.

2 page(s)

$3.50
Taking the Lines from a Model (Pub. No. 7859)

by Bertram S. Booth

With the growing interest in model yacht sailing and the increased use of models by designers in tank tests, a simple method for taking off lines should be of interest to many model builders. The following method requires only the simple device shown in the drawing and the usual drawing board and other rudimentary drafting equipment. It is entirely independent of the lifts or laminations; and the waterlines, buttocks and Stations may be spaced at any convenient interval on the drawing. No markings are required on the model and with a little care a very accurate drawing can be made. As both the buttocks and waterlines can be taken off, a check of the work is obtainable. The method is adaptable to either a full or a half model; and, if it is inconvenient, the back board of a half model need not be removed.

2 page(s)

$3.50
Proper Design of Sheaves for Use with Wire Rope (Pub. No. 7860)

by Herbert Macmillan

Wire rope is used in rapidly increasing quantities on modern yachts—for standing rigging of all kinds, as well as for operating ropes. Operating ropes mean those ropes which move over sheaves and drums, such as halliards, topping lifts, anchor ropes, etc. When a wire rope constantly bends and straightens out over sheaves and drums the metallic wires gradually become fatigued and sooner or later the individual wires in the rope start to break. The length of service of any type of wire rope depends upon the proper design of sheaves and drums. The highest grade rope which it is possible to manufacture will have very short life if used improperly. This cannot be pointed out too strongly since most operating ropes on yachts are used with equipment which was never designed for wire rope. The purpose of this article is to explain how service life may be materially increased by proper design of sheaves used with wire rope yacht rigging.

4 page(s)

$3.50
King Canvasback--A 15 ft. Plywood Kayak (Pub. No. 7861)

by John M. Miller Jr.

Here’s a classic kayak easily built in plywood and~canvas.

Fifteen ft. long and 31 in. in beam, King Canvasback is an ideal fatherand-son project. The craft is easily handled by one man and two boats can be car-topped on a small foreign car. It takes only a few weekends of work from layouT to launching. The project is simple enough for hand tools. but a variable-speed jig saw, drill and orbital sander make the job go faster.

4 page(s)

$3.50
Table of Moorings (Pub. No. 7862)

by W. B. Moores

This table of mooring and buoy sizes is based on a safety-factor of four and considers the sort of anchorage, length of the boat, weight of mooring and size of rope, chain and mooring-buoy.

1 page(s)

$3.50
Ingenious Main Halyard Latch Locks Sail Aloft (Pub. No. 7863)

It is generally acknowledged that the principal force acting upon the mast of a sailing yacht with the so-called Marconi rig is one of pure compression. It is desirable to reduce this compression as much as possible and also in big rigs, where the various strains are very great, to eliminate wear and strain on the wire halliard which experiences exceptional local stresses where it bends over the sheave or sheaves in the mast. In the big America’s Cup class yachts, where all these problems are acute, successful devices have been designed to reduce the compression on the mast and the strain on halliards by locking the mainsail aloft, once it is set. These devices have varied in form but all have been similar in principle. All have provided some sort of hook or latch aloft into which the headboard, or a link on the headboard, could engage and settle back into secure locked position, relieving all strain on the haliard but the halliard’s own weight. Locking the mainsail aloft, in some such way, cuts any compression caused by the mainsail and its halliard in half. The one shown and described here was designed by A.E. Luders, Jr., of the Luders Marine Cosntruction Co., Stamford, Connecticut. It is highly ingenious, quite simple, and as far as we can see, absolutely foolproof. It is operated entirely by the main halyard.

2 page(s)

$3.50
Experimenting with Yacht Lines (Pub. No. 7865)

by S. A. Vincent

A practical article on testing and towing models to determine the bestforms of underwater body. This data should be of interest to every yachtsman

The only sure way of developing the lines of vessels to fulfill all expectations by the amateur is by trial and error. Good judgment is not to be belittled, but even the best of naval architects are not perfect and it is rarely that a design is so fine that it cannot be improved upon. To build a special series of full sized vessels, whether they are motor boats or battleships, each varying slightly in a definite way from the other and so find the best hull form, would be unduly expensive. Fortunately it is possible to build small models at a comparatively moderate cost and from these the exact performance of a full sized vessel can be predicted with mathematical precision. For years, all naval vessels and most merchant vessels, have been designed following extensive model experiments. It is only rarely that yachts or motor boats are designed from such tests and this will be understood when I explain that it costs several hundred dollars for one model to be built and tested.

3 page(s)

$3.50
75-Square Foot Ice Boat (Pub. No. 7869)

by Edson I. Schock

This small ice yacht was designed to fit the 75 square-foot racing class. While the woodwork on her is very simple, there is quite a bit of machine work to be done, and the prospective builder should be able to do this, or have facilities available to do it for him.

4 page(s)

$3.50
Pump Tilt to Trim Your Outboard (Pub. No. 7870)

by Walter B. Chandler Jr.

You can make your own power-tilt mechanism for very little money.

Most outboard engines have pin holes to allow adjustments that fix the angle between your lower unit and the transom. Now the larger motors have standard or optional power-tilt arrangements to permit tilting up your prop when you’re beaching your boat or running in shallow water, trimming your lower unit for the best angle when getting up on plane and trying for the most speed or running on an even keel with various loads aboard. But if your older outboard doesn’t have a power-trim kit available, you can make your own as I did. Basic parts required are a hydraulic power pump, hydraulic cylinder, lower tilt bracket and upper tilt bracket.

2 page(s)

$3.50
Bargain Guage for Gas Consumption (Pub. No. 7871)

by Robert D. Stearns

Ease your outboard’s offshore energy costs with this $3 jug test.

Fuel costs make knowing the gasoline consumption of your outboard more important than ever. If you can figure out in advance your most efficient cruising speed, miles per gallon and range of action on a tank of gas, you’re sure to increase your boating safety and enjoyment. Most large outboards burn about one galion per 10 hp per hour at full throttle. A 100-hp mill uses up approximately 10 gph wide open, but a 10 percent reduction in rpm can cut gas consumption by 20 percent, while an 80 percent drop in rpm may mean a 35 percent gas saving. These averages apply generally to planing hulls riding over, rather than through, the water, but they can vary greatly from boat to boat with different-size motors and loads. It’s certainly worth the small amount of time and expense, using the method shown here, to determine what your fuel requirements really are. Almost any outboard with separate fuel tank can be tested; with adaptations the system should also work for inboards.

2 page(s)

$3.50
How to Read and Run a River (Pub. No. 7872)

by A.J.(Jib) McMasters

There are two aspects to the art of river boating. One is knowing how to handle your boat. But being a good boatman involves more than just being a good boat handler when you’re on moving water. So No. 2 is being able to recognize the changing characteristics of the water itself. Fluency in reading water encompasses several basics. You need to be able to distinguish the course of a river’s current, its speed, the lay of obstacles and how to tell which of several possible routes is easiest. While the emphasis here is on fast water, the principles involved apply to all river boating. Fast water simply exaggerates the forces at work.

3 page(s)

$3.50
Electric Power Aplenty for the Small Boat (Pub. No. 7873)

By William L. Hensley

Take a small boat like mine and add a radiotelephone, a spotlight, a cabin fan, an electric bilge pump, a depth finder, a few extra cabin lights, and you’ve got a problem: where to get the electricity to run them all. Sure, my boat’s engine has a conventional generator/storage-battery electrical system, but that was designed, primarily, to power standard electrical gear and supply current to the starter motor. It just can’t supply enough juice to keep all my electrical auxiliaries purring happily. Solutions? Two are obvious: Add an independent battery to power part of the equipment. The hitch here, of course, is that this battery must be carried ashore frequently for recharging. Or the existing electrical system must be beefed up by substituting a heftier generator, or—better yet—an alternator. But this is only a partial fix, since the improvement is effective only when the boat’s engine is running. Switch off the engine, and we are back where we started. The best solution (and the one I finally settled on) is to install a ship’s-generator system, driven by a small auxiliary engine. The unusual thing about mine (seen in the pictures), is that I built it myself mostly out of junk parts.

3 page(s)

$3.50
Find the Best Prop for Your Boat on Paper--First (Pub. No. 7874)

By Jim Martenhoff

Most boatmen understand that propeller pitch determines their boat’s performance. Too little pitch and the prop spins wastefully on an over-revving engine. Too much and the wheel (prop) slows down as the engine labors valiantly to drive it. You can play around with props on a trial-and-error basis, trying to find one that will match your boat’s hull shape, weight, and engine output. But that’s time-consuming and can be costly unless a dealer will lend you props to experiment with. Using two simple rules of thumb I’ve developed over many years, you can do the experimenting on paper with simple arithmetic .

2 page(s)

$3.50
Model Hydroplane Skims the Water (Pub. No. 7875)

By Roy L Clough Jr.

Pusher prop spun by model-plane engine gives high performance. Construction is easy and fast

Hydrofoils have been around for some time, but even so, nothing on the boating scene draws every eye like a hydroplane lifting out of the water as it gains speed. Even the U.S. Navy has been attracted to foils, and has tested them on its fast boats. The model shown here can be completed in a couple of work sessions. Surface-piercing foils and air-prop drive give it speed and stability with minimum complexity. Construction is far simpler than you’d guess from the performance. Basically, these craft deliver greater speed because resistance against several small areas (foils) is considerably lower than against a complete, submerged hull. Resistance declines as the craft rises. Completely submerged foils are the most efficient, but they require sensing and control systems to keep them at proper depth. Surface-piercing foils automatically adjust for depth—but they also have a tendency to create air bubbles that reduce lift. This model uses a foil design that minimizes this undesirable side effect.

3 page(s)

$3.50
Polyfoam Swimming Raft (Pub. No. 7876)

This durable and unsinkable swimming raft can be assembled in just a few hours with simplest of tools. The core of the raft is two billets of "Dyfoam," expanded polystyrene foam that does not absorb water.

1 page(s)

$3.50
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