Boat Design

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by Robert M. Steward
How to size pipe to build davits.
$3.50
Detailed design information for designing and building centerboards and rudders
$3.50
by George L. Cary
Plotted curves for weights of average boats without engines or equipment.
$3.50
The results of a year's research ib plywood development for boats.
$3.50
Moulded plywood has greatly affected the production-boat field.
$3.50
Planking with plywood has opened a new field of marine design.
$3.50
by Edson I. Schock
When using sheet plywood for planking, you'll save labor if you plan on this type of hull.
$3.50
Chart for Selecting Size of Pipe Davits (Pub. No. 7704)
Robert M. Steward/ How to size pipe to build davits.

by Robert M. Steward

The number of davits required on the various types of small naval vessels is indeed remarkable. We were accustomed to davits on yachts for handling the dinghy and anchors, but a patrol boat or minesweeper has many times the need for them. Formerly forged from solid stock, we now find them predominantly made of steel pipe, generally galvanized, in order to save weight and for ease of manufacture, and we believe they will be used more extensively on yachts when the building of such craft is resumed. The accompanying chart has been utilized countless times for davits on vessels assigned to arduous duty at sea and no trouble from their use has been reported. However, it should be borne in mind that, although the chart includes up to eight inch, caution should be used when the larger sizes are indicated, due to the fact that stresses other than the direct load, such as that developed when a fair lead sheave is attached to the davit, or the eccentric pull on the hauling part of the tackle, complicate the stress analysis and must be taken into account. Therefore it is considered that very important davits, such as those for lifeboats, that are to be kept to the minimum of weight consistent with strength, are beyond the scope of this chart and must be carefully engineered separately. Besides, pipe does not always provide the most advantageous section.

2 page(s)

$3.50
Notes on Building Center-Boards & Rudders (Pub. No. 7711)
/ Detailed design information for designing and building centerboards and rudders

There are many ways to construct center-boards, trunks and rudders for sailing boats, and the details for any one particular boat are usually to be found on the plans which one is following. However, the principles are much the same in building all these more or less troublesome parts, so a few general comments should be of interest to the amateur boat builder.

3 page(s)

$3.50
How Much Does She Weigh (Pub. No. 7857)
George L. Cary/Plotted curves for weights of average boats without engines or equipment.

by George L. Carey

This question is often asked. Only a naval architect can give the proper answer in most cases. In this curve sheet Mr. George L. Cary has plotted curves for weights of average boats without engines or equipment.

1 page(s)

$3.50
Designing for Construction in Plywood (Pub. No. 7021)
/ The results of a year's research ib plywood development for boats.

There came recently to our attention an unusual comment on a build-it-yourself boat design which has prompted the writer to give here the results of a year’s sporadic research in plywood development for boats.

The statement in question was to the effect that the bottom lines of a certain boat had not been altered except to adapt it to plywood construction; that is, apparently concave lines of cross section were straightened out from keel to chine and from chine to sheer. We have examined dozens of V-bottom designs for plywood adaptation and have seen but one in which the designer did not labor under the delusion that straight sections would accommodate a plywood bottom without strain. As a matter of fact, there is only one time when such a condition can exist and that is when section lines are parallel, or generating lines of a cylindric surface at right angles to the center plane of the boat. In such a case a deep-bottomed sail boat with easy lines may be developed which will be more or less orthodox, but this is an exception. Although we labored under the straight line section delusion for awhile, we soon disproved it, as you may do, by carving a half model of a stock V-bottomed runabout with the sections straightened out and then attempting to cover it with a plane surface (cardboard). When the carboard was forced to meet all points on chine and keel, it buckled badly; and even on the sides there was sufficient distortion to demonstrate that only a convex section of some nature would meet the conditions necessary for plywood covering. To determine the proper form for the accommodation of plywood covering we turned to the drawing board, and thus was evolved the design for Conendric.

4 page(s)

$3.50
Developing a Plywood Design (Pub. No. 7022)
/ Moulded plywood has greatly affected the production-boat field.

Moulded plywood has greatly affected the production-boat field, it is true. But there has been some over-optimism as to the application of the process to all types of boat construction.

The plywood mould is an expensive item, too costly for the small shops which can pattern and produce a bent plywood boat to compete with the production plants even though their sales are counted in the dozens instead of hundreds. Often the bent plywood boat answers the need of the buyer who wants something a little different from those available in stock boats. It is almost always ideal for the amateur who can turn out an acceptable piece of boatbuilding even when the conventionally planked boat baffles him completely. There is little question but that the field of the bent plywood boat has barely been tapped. Newer and better glues and methods of glueing are being used, both in the manufacture of the plywood itself and by builders in the construction assembly. By cutting darts into boat sides hollows can be worked into them which cannot be pulled into the bent sheet. Where bends are too great for the thickness of plywood desired it can be applied in double or even triple layers, glued together to form a structurally stronger member than the single sheet would have been. And designs are being adapted to the characteristics of bent plywood to produce boats which have their own unique advantages.

4 page(s)

$3.50
Designing a Sailboat to Use Plywood (Pub. No. 7023)
/ Planking with plywood has opened a new field of marine design.

Planking with plywood has opened a new field of marine design. It was soon found that adaptation of hulls to the bent plywood sheet evolved new designing methods.

Bent plywood design depends on judgement of the character of curved planes rather than on the conventional buttocks-waterlines-sections cross fairing method of arriving at the finished set of hull lines. Design and lofting of plywood, therefore, entails development methods not commonly used in conventional hull drawings. But when the characteristics of bent plywood are comprehended, the design of plywood hulls is found to be a simple procedure, and requires less drawing and lofting time than the conventional hull lines.

4 page(s)

$3.50
Developable-Surface Boats (Pub. No. 7035)
Edson I. Schock/When using sheet plywood for planking, you'll save labor if you plan on this type of hull.

by Edson I. Schock

When using sheet plywood for planking, you’ll save labor if you plan on this type of hull.

If you are planning to build a boat using sheet plywood for planking, your work will be made easier if you select a design having a developable-surface hull. This means a flat or V-bottom hull, with conical or cylindrical bottom and topsides. Either a cone or a cylinder may be developed, or laid out flat, on plywood or sheet metal, and the plank cut from this development put on the boat without twist. Plywood bends fairly easily in one direction only. If you try to bend it in two directions at the same time, it will resent this and resist your efforts. It may even crack. Let us consider what developable-surface boats look like. The simplest form is one having cylindrical surfaces for both sides and bottom, with the elements of the cylinder showing true length in the body plan or sections. Such a boat is shown in Fig. 1.

4 page(s)

$3.50
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