Furniture and Interiors 

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Build a Fiberglass Sink for Your Boat (Pub. No. 7014)

The difference between a boat and a yacht is often in her appointments. Why not build a one-piece fiberglass countertop and sink as the show piece of the galley for your boat?

Plan the counter-top and sink combination to fit the space you have in your boat, but remember that the stove can be a pull-out drawer affair, under the counter, which will save room on the Counter-top for drying dishes or mixing salads. The mold is simple to make and should not scare anyone off who can glue boards together and sand and paint same.

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How to Build a Fiberglass Icebox (Pub. No. 7015)

Now that the techniques of fiberglass construction have reached a stage where it is relatively easy for the average boat owner to build some of his interior accommodations of this versatile material.

It’s high time you gave that old, rusty, landlubber ice-box, chopped up to fit the space, the deep six and build a rust-proof, modern job out of fiberglass. Lay down that belaying pin, mate; it won’t cost a fortune. In fact, the cost will surprise you, it’s so little in comparison to what you’d have to pay for almost any other material. It’s cheap, it’s easy to build with, it’s the most efficient of materials and you can tailor it to fit right into that spot where you’d like to have an icebox. And if that’s not enough, it will look better than a professional job and be as modern as tomorrow, besides. All you need is a little plywood, some pieces of Celotex for insulation, a few yards of fiberglass boat cloth and a quart or two of plastic.

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Build Your Own Fiberglass Refrigerator (Pub. No. 7016)

Heres a project for the winter months when the boat is in storage—build a refrigerator.

Modern life being what it is, refrigeration is practically indispensable. There are two essential parts to a good refrigerator: the mechanical cooling system and a perfectly insulated box. There are many electrical refrigeration units on the market especially designed for use on boats, which run from either 6 or 12 volt batteries and there are a few which can be switched over to shoreside current when the boat is at her own berth. Several of these units are offered by manufacturers and they are also being shown in boat shows around the country. The refrigerator box you can build yourself and it will be better insulated than most home refrigerators if you use foam plastic insulation as directed in this piece. More important—you can tailor the box to the space allowable in your own galley and the cost will be small compared to buying a commercial refrigerator.

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Plywood for Interiors (Pub. No. 7028)

When the planking is finished the boat is only one-third finished.

The other two-thirds is finishing the cabin and interior and other miscellaneous items. So if your design is such that you cannot use waterproof marine plywood for the hull you certainly can take advantage of it for interiors. It seems that most of the articles recently written cover its application to hulls omitting almost entirely the interior. Therefore this question is certainly a timely one and it is hoped that these few notes may guide others building or remodeling the interior. You don’t need special designs to use waterproof plywood for the inside. Every boat can use it profitably and almost to the exclusion of old fashioned methods because almost everything is a flat surface or simple curve. It certainly isn’t like trying to bend compound curves.

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Build a Table for Your Boat (Pub. No. 7034)

by Gordon P. Manning

Eating aboard a small boat is just as much fun as eating ashore when you have a table like this one that’s stable and stowable
.

Picnicking, as most everyone knows, is one of the numerous pleasures which your small boat can afford you. But sometimes, when you have reached your favorite spot, you decide you’d rather eat aboard; maybe because the area is crowded or perhaps it looks like rain. Eating aboard a small boat can be just as much fun as eating ashore, if you have a decent table on which to set up the food and drinks. Unfortunately, however, most outboards have no adequate flat space for this purpose. Lugging along a folding table is a nuisance, and in many cases is impossible to use. A year ago I designed and built this little folding table for our outboard, and it has paid back its modest cost many times over in pleasure and satisfaction. Essentially, it is a hinged affair which hangs from the lower edge of the cockpit gunwale and is entirely out of the way when not in use. To set it up, you merely lift it up, slip a leg into sockets on the floor and table bottom, and you have as stable a table as you can find. A hook and eye keep the table from banging against the hull when it is in the folded position. A hole drilled in the leg provides the means of hanging it up.

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Double-Duty Cruise Tank (Pub. No. 7036)

by Gordon P. Manning

Expand your effective cruising range with this gasoline-storage unit that also acts as helmsman’s seat.

Most outboards today are still struggling along with the 6gal. gas tank that came with the motor. This allows you little over an hour’s cruising time—obviously not enough if any cruising distances are involved. As a result, the average outboarder gets himself one or two 5-gal. cans to hold a reserve supply, to permit him to increase his operating range. These cans, loose in a small boat, present a definite safety hazard. And transferring gasoline from can to tank is a risky business, even in calm water. So risky, in fact, that boating authorities insist that all cans and portable tanks be removed from the boat before refueling. Larger, built-in tanks are the only safe answer to this gas-supply problem for outboards of 15’ to 21’. Cruising or long-range tanks are now available in styles and sizes to fit any boat. With one of these as a basis, you have a good start toward-worryfree bqating. This article tells you how you can solve the gasoline-storage problem safely and at the same time make a useful helmsman’s seat with lockers. The tank goes below and the seat above, The seat itself may even be an adaptation of the existing one, to hold expenses down.

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Table and Companionway Steps (Pub. No. 7040)

by William D. Jackson

Want to dress up your cruiser? Here are two accessories you can build adapted to both cruisers and sailers.

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How to Build Convertible Berth-to Seat Stowage (Pub. No. 7750)

Almost any boat, no matter how well-designed, can be improved to meet the special needs of its owner. Many smaller cruising craft have ample bunk space in common, but not very adequate seating space below decks. This can be important for a cruising couple who do not need four bunks, but do need a place in the evening to sit, read, and relax. Or, when friends are aboard and the weather is inclement, it is nice to be able to go below deck and have sufficient seating space for everyone.

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How to Make Seat Cushions (Pub. No. 7751)

The long cushions used on some boat cockpit seats are unwieldy to handle, especially when you want to stow them. If permanently left out, they can fade, get soggy, and are at the mercy of indifferent birds. This problem can be solved by making smaller sectional cushions that are much easier to handle, stack, and stow out of the way. It is even nice to have a handy cushion to put behind your back for reading or sunning on the foredeck. You may also want to make fitted cushions to provide more comfortable sitting space in other areas of your craft, such as the top of the engine box, bait box, foredeck, storage box, or for bunk backrests. In addition, cushions made with closed-cell or monocellular foam material can provide an extra safety factor. They do not, of course, take the place of personal floatation devices and are not U.S. Coast Guard-approved, but they do float and are readily available if ever needed.

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How to Build an Easy-Access Cupboard (Pub. No. 7753)

Serving food on the open water is not without its hazards. A stack or two of dishes and cups on a cupboard shelf with the cupboard door slightly ajar is always likely to end up at your feet. One device for making a very secure plate and cup storage cabinet for your boat’s galley is to replace the cabinet doors with a cutout cupboard cover panel that offers easy access to dishes and cups, but prevents them from tumbling out in rough water conditions.

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How to Make No-Spill Lift-and-Pull Drawers (Pub. No. 7754)

In rough-water cruising, the drawers of cabinets can slide open and spill their contents over the floor of a boat’s cabin. Lift-and-pull cabinet drawers, however, prevent this and end problems with drawer latches that fail or stick. Due to the vast differences in cabinets, it is highly unlikely that any specific dimensions provided would fit the cabinets on your boat so you will have to substitute all dimensions to fit your requirements. To build a lift-and-pull drawer for a cabinet, follow these steps, substituting dimensions that suit your situation

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How to Make a Vertical Storage Drawer (Pub. No. 7755)

In or near the galley of many boats, there often is unused or wasted space between cabinets and a stove, sink or refrigerator. While such space is much too narrow for a cabinet, a vertical storage drawer can fit, adding additional shelf space. This project is building a vertical drawer with four shallow-tray shelves ideal for storing knives, forks and spoons, and other kitchen equipment. And, if you wish to omit the first and third shelves, it makes a good “grog” locker. All material used, except the drawer’s face panel, is 1/2 inch wood that can be pine, mahogany or marine plywood. The face panel is 3/4 inch mahogany. By using a face panel for the drawer, construction is simplified and the need to make rabbet and dado cuts, except for notches to fit shelf side braces, is avoided. To build a vertical storage drawer, follow these steps.

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How to Make a Removeable Stove-Top Counter Top (Pub. No. 7756)

Work space in the galley of a small or medium-size cruiser is always in short supply. But one place where you can make more functional use of the space is the stainless-steel lid on a galley stove. When the stove is not in use, it usually is a handy spot except that it is a slippery surface with rounded edges. And, it is not recommended that you place glasses or other objects on the lid if its surface is wet or if the boat is moving. A quick project, however, can make the steel galley stove top a very usable space, particularly when entertaining. Basically, the countertop is a 3/4 inch teak or mahogany board with holes drilled for holding tumblers. This glass-holder is mounted with screws to the rear portion of the tilting stove lid. The front portion of the countertop consists of edging screwed onto the steel lid to keep hors d’oeuvres and other snacks safely corralled.

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How to Make a Dish and Mug Rack (Pub. No. 7757)

On many larger craft where seagoing meals and snacks are served often each day, there usually is sufficient counter space aboard and a need to keep dishes and mugs handy for use. Here are two simple building projects that do the job: a filing rack for dishes, and a vertical stack rack for mugs.

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How to Make an Overhead Chart Rack (Pub. No. 7758)

In a small cruising boat, life is more livable if good use is made of all available space. One place where there is usually some unused space is the spot over a dinette table. A hinged chart and magazine rack can fit snugly against the cabin overhead when not in use. Sitting at the table, the latch can be released to let the rack swing down for easy access to charts, magazines, and other items, including navigation instruments. The rack hangs over the middle of the table out of the way. Similar overhead lockers can be made a little deeper and in different dimensions to fit in a boat’s galley, head, or over bunks. They can provide ready access to all sorts of items. This rack, which can be made of mahogany or plywood, is designed as a shallow 2-5/8 x 12-1/2 x 26-3/4 inch box. There is one off-center divider to allow a larger place for tabloid-size charts or magazines, or two regular-size magazines, side by side. The other compartment holds regular-size magazines. Shock cords keep the contents from tumbling out when the rack is opened.

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How to Make a Bulkhead Chart Holder (Pub. No. 7759)

Many boats have an outside cabin wall, or bulkhead, that makes an ideal place to mount a chart holder for the helmsman. Or, the chart holder can be mounted on an inside cabin wall if desired. It is easy to make such a chart holder with a simple three-sided frame and a sheet of acrylic. Several charts can be slid between the clear plastic and the cabin bulkhead. The one on top is not only visible, but the plastic surface can be used for plotting courses with a grease pencil or marking pen. When the weather is rough, the charts remain safe from wind, rain and spray.

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How to Make a Folding Galley Shelf (Pub. No. 7760)

In the galley of a small craft, any project that uses wasted space and promotes easier, simplified cooking procedures helps the cook stay in the good graces of the crew. A hinged shelf at an end of a galley counter can do multiple duty. It can serve as a spot to prepare food, a support for the galley stove, a place to drain and dry dishes, or as the bar when the sun is over the yardarm.

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Build this Cockpit Galley (Pub. No. 7893)

Any small-boat owner is grateful when he can dream up a scheme that will let him get more use from his limited floor space. The skipper of the craft shown did just that when he custom-built this cabinet. It provides a compact cooking center, a storage locker and a companion helmsman’s seat. Lacking standing headroom and adequate walking-around space, the cabin was ruled out as the place to locate a galley. But once it was decided to put the galley in the cockpit, two conditions had to be met: It had to be compact, and it had to be out of the way whenever shipboard activities shifted to fishing, skiing, skin diving or cruising. The design shown meets these requirements because the center becomes a seat when the lid is closed. For user comfort, you can add a flotation cushion. Swing open the top and the galley is immediately ready to use. The molded fiberglass drainboard and sink is equipped with a combination spigot and pump attached by hose to a 5-gal. jerry can stored inside the cabinet. The sink empties through a fitting in the side of the hull via a rubber hose. The interior of the galley cabinet may be outfitted as desired to facilitate storage of cooking utensils and other kitchen supplies. The storage locker is convenient for similar storage and is within easy reach of the chef’s hands. The skipper used the original cabinet cupboard to stow life preservers which often are crammed into inaccessible corners of cabins.

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Care and Repair of Inflatables, The (Pub. No. 7923)

by A.J. (Jib) McMasters

Inflatables are very popular. The reason for their success is several-fold. They’re relatively inexpensive, easy to store, tough and long-lived (12 to 15 yrs.) and easy to maintain. But like everything else, they last longer and perform better if you treat them right. Boatmen who have not had experience with inflatables often wonder whether the boat won’t pop if they hit a sharp object. The heavyweight cloth used in the top brands is ripstop nylon which, of course, is rot-free. The water-proofing is a neoprene/hypalon mixture which has demonstrated long life. There is only 2 to 3 lbs. of pressure in the tubes so even if they’re slashed with a knife, the air only oozes out. In water it is almost impossible to damage an inflatable. It is around shore that problems occur. Heres how to take care of them.

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