Deck and Hull Gear 

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Fiberglass Top for the Open Outboard, A (Pub. No. 7011)

With modern plastic materials—Styrofoam, fiberglass and epoxy—you can make your own lightweight top and, by enclosing the sides with polyethylene or plexiglass and the cockpit with vinyl- or neoprene-impregnated nylon, convert your boat for overnight use.

After a season’s cruising with the family aboard, the average skipper has, no doubt, thought of several improvements he’ll want to make in the boat during the winter layover. One good addition for cruising comfort would be to build a cabin top. A top will convert an open boat into an overnight cruiser, provide shelter during a rainstorm and shade passengers from the hot sun during the summer. The cabin top shown here can be built as a single piece or can have the cockpit extension cover; either way it will add immeasurably to the usefulness of an open runabout and its ultimate trade-in value when you decide to go for a larger boat. The drawings do not give dimensions because your particular boat will determine how large the top must be; each skipper will have to make it fit his own boat. General construction and only those dimensions which are standard for certain items are provided.

2 page(s)

$3.50
Fiberglass Flying Bridge Shelter Top (Pub. No. 7012)

Several new developments in plastics and fabric materials are now available to yachtsmen interested in improving or maintaining conventionally constructed boats.

These products include new polysulfide rubber seam compound and adhesives, new urethane, epoxy, vinyl and polysulfide synthetic rubber coatings and foamed urethane plastic boards; all available in the boating market place. Among the many inquiries I receive are always these two questions: “Are these plastics hard to use?” “Can I do the job?” And my answer is this: If you can handle the paint job on a boat, if you can cover the cabin top with canvas, if you can build a hatch cover, then you can handle plastics. The approach may be a little different but the materials handle in much the same way as those you’ve been using. Liquid plastics are like varnish. They look like varnish, they feel like varnish in the brush and they will run like varnish when applied so that you must handle them in the same way. The difference is that they will not cure (or “dry”) unless you add something to the plastic when you are ready to apply it. You sometimes have to add a little thinner to paint in order to use it, so what is really difficult about adding a little catalyst to cure the plastic? The only refinements are: 1. The correct amount of catalyst to add. 2. Plastic will dry in the pot in about 45 minutes, unlike paint which will dry on the surface of the job in a few hours but will only skin over in the pot. With plastic, you have to use the batch into which you have stirred the catalyst within the dry time and you have to wash out the brush in order to save it from becoming a plastic solid reinforced with brush hairs.

2 page(s)

$3.50
Building Fiberglass Ruders and Spinnaker Poles (Pub. No. 7013)

The use of fiberglass in boat construction is not limited to hulls and superstructures. Interesting new practical applications are being discovered every day.

The problems of wood construction of yacht rudders have always been well known, but fiberglass-reinforced plastic at last offers the solution.

4 page(s)

$3.50
Leakproof Cockpit of Fiberglass, A (Pub. No. 7017)

Are you tired of that leaky cockpit? Soggy ropes in a damp lazaret? Water dripping on the quarter berths? If you are, replace the old dog with a fiberglass cockpit.

It will be light and will provide more room below, yet be roomier on deck because it can be molded in one piece and suspended from the deck. A fiberglass cockpit is fairly easy to build and install; if you follow the plan outlined by the accompanying drawings you can channel the water through the built-in gutters into-the scuppers-in the cockpit well.

2 page(s)

$3.50
Building a Plywood Cabin (Pub. No. 7029)

The sides of a light plywood cabin can be built without any separate frame as the different plies running at right angles hold it together and support the top much as a frame would be expected to do where a single thickness of wood is used. However, where the design calls for very large windows so that the cabin sides are mostly cut away, leaving little support to the top, it would seem to be a good plan to provide a framing piece of oak between windows or where ever there is room for it. This could be an oak batten about 1/2 inch thick by 2 inches or more wide, securely fastened with screws or bolts.

2 page(s)

$3.50
Auxiliary Motor Mounts (Pub. No. 7039)

Three different types of outboard motor mounts to add to your sailboat.

A sailboat that is drifting helplessly may present a picturesque scene; but, to its occupants, it's of scant comfort to know that a becalmed wind might eventually stir again to return their craft speedily to home port. On the other hand, if a sudden gale forces a captain to drop his sails, it is most comforting to be able to rely on auxiliary power in order to navigate through the blast. By means of one of these special transom mounts, an outboard motor can be adapted to any 12- to 30-ft. cruiser or sailboat to serve as auxiliary power in case of a breakdown in the weather or the main power plant. Even if you have excellent sailing weather, you ll find it much easier to moor in crowded anchorage or to navigate through a twisting channel with the aid of a small outboard motor. The article illustrates three types of mounts, which adapt different-sized outboard motors to various transoms. The mounts can be quickly built from scrap materials usually found in the basement or junkyard. In case the shaft of your outboard motor is too short, motor manufacturers are prepared to supply motors with longer shafts just for this purpose.

2 page(s)

$3.50
Add a Cabin to your Boat (Pub. No. 7703)

You can save yourself a lot of grief from the weather by adding a permanent cabin to your runabout for very little money.

4 page(s), 1 plate(s)

$3.50
How to Make a Real Ship's Wheel (Pub. No. 7705)

by Hi Sibley and Don Selchow

One of these handsome yacht wheels is for marine use; the other makes an attractive wall decoration. Both are well designed and require only a lathe and scroll saw for their construction. Mahogany Pilot Wheel For Wall. Note: It would be a good idea to build the decorative version first to work out the "kinks" before tackling the real thing and perhaps wasting expensive teak and/or mahogany. The photo on the right shows the decorative wheel, which will lend an attractive boaty atmosphere to a room, especially if the marine motif is carried out in lamps, ash trays, etc. Spokes are lathe-turned, and the rim is made up of 60 degree segments cut on the scroll saw, then assembled with casein glue and brass screws. Finish with stain, filler and two or three coats of top grade spar varnish.
Substantial Yacht's Wheel. This wheel on the left is the real thing, and calculated to give long, hard service. The rim is of hardwood, built up in sections of 60 degrees each, as in the decorative wheel. Spokes are lathe-turned from 3/4xl-in. stock. Wheel is assembled with casein glue and Everdur screws. Brass flanges clamp spokes to spool and serve as a hub for shaft.

2 page(s)

$3.50
Rigging Adjustable Fenders on Tracks (Pub. No. 7722)

If you dock your craft in a number of different harbors, or cruise or sail on tidal waters, adjusting boat fenders to the proper height and position to protect the sides of your hull can be a problem. This project offers a method of rigging boat fenders so that they can be quickly adjusted for any kind of dock. The system is particularly helpful on tidal waters where high dock posts or pilings are common, but this system is a big advantage anywhere a boat has to dock against posts because horizontally slung boat fenders just do not offer sufficient protection when there is a heavy chop. In such situations, fender boards are the best solution. But fender boards must be rigged in the proper location to span dock posts, and a boat just does not have enough cleats or fender hooks to meet every situation.

3 page(s)

$3.50
How to Build a Swim Platform (Pub. No. 7724)

If you have priced swimming platforms, you know that they are expensive. Small ones in kit form cost well over $100, and the price goes up to $600 or $700. It is not too difficult to build a swim platform for your boat, and you can save a considerable amount of money if you use marine plywood instead of teak or mahogany. Swim platforms on inboard boats are mounted close to the water, about 4 inches above the waterline. On stern-drive craft they are mounted higher to clear the drive unit when it is tilted upward. On a 22 or 24 foot stern-drive cruiser, for example, the platform is usually about halfway between the chine and the rub rail, or about in the middle of the transom. Inboard boats generally have curved transoms while sterndrive boats usually have straight transoms. This project is designed for a stern-drive cruiser with a curved transom that is 7 feet 6 inches wide. It calls for a 7 foot swim platform. But if your boat has a straight transom or a different beam, it will be easy to modify the following construction procedure for your craft.

4 page(s)

$3.50
How to Make an Anchor Line Reel (Pub. No. 7725)

Where and how to store a few hundred feet of nylon anchor line can present quite a problem on a small craft. Because a boat’s anchor line is its “emergency brake,” the anchor should always be ready for instant use. Most anchors can be carried securely and neatly outside on the craft’s forward deck. The anchor line, however, should be stored inside and out of the weather. Many boats come equipped with anchor chocks on the deck and an appropriate through-deck fitting, called a deck pipe that permits the line to be fed from the anchor through the deck’s surface and into an anchor line storage area. Below deck, a means must be provided to keep the line from tangling when stored. There is one way to keep an anchor line ready to pay out quickly, and that is to store it on a reel just like fishing line.

3 page(s)

$3.50
Installing Cleats-Winches-Rails and Pulpits (Pub. No. 7726)

This Data Sheet deals with various methods of mounting deck fittings on fiberglass decks with foam cores, solid fiberglass decks, and wooden decks.

Mounting a cleat, winch, railing or pulpit is not generally a major project, especially if the new fitting is to be installed in a location on the deck that already has been properly reinforced. There are a number of mounting options available to the do-it-yourselfer, but they depend on the type of deck construction.

4 page(s)

$3.50
Installing a Windlass (Pub. No. 7727)

A windlass, depending on its location, poses a different installation problem for boat owners. Here, we will cover two types of installations. One is installing a windlass on a fiberglass deck. The other is installing an electric-powered windlass below deck that would be ideal for larger craft .

4 page(s)

$3.50
Adding Grab Rails to the Cabin Top (Pub. No. 7728)

Adding grab rails to the roof of a craft’s cabin is not a difficult job, and it can literally be a lifesaver for anyone working around the sides of the boat. It is possible to buy metal pipe with end and intermediate supports that can be bolted into place, but these can be difficult to locate. Two methods of making grab rails are discussed here: one is for an all-wood railing; the other is for a metal rail with wooden supports.

4 page(s)

$3.50
Building a Stabilizer--A Flopper-Stopper (Pub. No. 7729)

("FLOPPER STOPPERS")

For more than a century, various kinds of devices have been used on boats to reduce the rolling action caused by waves. The most successful stabilizers are movable fins, but they are used only on ocean liners and large, expensive yachts. Many complex systems have been developed but a simple way is to use a pair of sea anchors with weights to hold them down and add stability. This "flopper-stopper" rig consists of a pole rigged at right angles from each side of the boat with a sea anchor and weight hanging down from the end of each pole, several feet out from the boat. The farther out the anchors are placed, the more efficient they will be.

4 page(s)

$3.50
Building a Boarding Stepladder (Pub. No. 7731)

Many modern boats feature high sides or plenty of freeboard in their cockpit areas that add to boating safety, but make it more difficult for passengers and crew to get on and off the craft. An inboard stepladder can solve this problem. The boarding stepladder in this project has only two steps about 10 inches apart that can be modified to fit your boat by adding or omitting a step, or by possibly changing the height of the steps to suit the situation.

2 page(s)

$3.50
Installing Trim Tabs (Pub. No. 7732)

Planing-type boats that are reluctant to plane are not only fuel hogs but they also can be dangerous. When the bow of a boat rides too high, the view of the helmsman is obscured to the point where he may be unable to spot a water-soaked log or timber. The hazard can be even greater when leaving a busy harbor with heavy boat traffic. Overloading and underpowering are two reasons why some boats squat at the stern and are sluggish in getting into a planing attitude. Load placement in the boat can be another contributing factor and as simple a procedure as moving the passengers forward can work wonders to improve the performance of a craft. Trimming the boat by shifting weight, including the weight of passengers, may not, however, be the ideal solution. Guests may prefer to ride in the cockpit rather than in a forward cabin. The obvious solution to an underpowered boat that is slow to come on plane is more power, which can be costly. If the problem is primarily a matter of trim and not of power, the addition of trim tabs can help solve it.

2 page(s)

$3.50
Some Handy Ways to Stow Anchors (Pub. No. 7736)

You can save yourself some embarrassment and prevent damage to your craft by carrying an anchor In a handy place, ready to use at a moment’s notice. There are many places where you may be cruising—long, narrow channels; among islands and reefs; in crowded harbors—where a sudden rigging or auxiliary power failure can get you into instant trouble. It is not the time to have to rummage through a cockpit anchor locker or a mess of snarled line in the forepeak to get an anchor clear and rigged for use. On the other hand, no sailor wants to have an anchor adrift on the forepeak in heavy weather. For that reason, many popular types of anchors are usually chocked in bronze fittings that support the anchor crown and fluke tips, and provide a tiedown for the shank. There are, however, some serious shortcomings with this type of installation. For example, jib sheets are likely to snag on the anchor stock when the boat is tacked. When handling headsails, you can accidentally step on the stock and wrench the anchor out of its chocks, sometimes bending them as well. And, the anchor stocks are apt to be in the way of your ankles. There are a number of solutions to such problems depending on the type of anchor you have and the configuration of your boat

4 page(s)

$3.50
Mounting an Outboard on a Sailboat (Pub. No. 7737)

Many sailors like to add an outboard auxiliary to their daysailers or trailerable cruising boats. And, anglers who fish offshore or on big inland lakes also like to add a smaller outboard if their crafts are equipped with a single big outboard, sterndrive or inboard engine. Such an addition provides efficient fuel-saving trolling and a “spare tire” for getting home in case the main engine has trouble.

4 page(s)

$3.50
Rooftop Ventilator from a Plastic Bowl, A (Pub. No. 7771)

If your boat requires additional ventilation, here is a simple way to make a ventilator that mounts on a hatch or cabin top. It provides good ventilation in rainy weather, yet keeps out rain and spray. For this project, you will require a piece of 4 inch diameter plastic pipe, approximately 7 to 8 inches in length. You also will need a small can of solvent cement for the type of plastic pipe you obtain. In addition, the project calls for two fittings: a coupling section for the pipe that is about 4 inches long, and an end cap. The only other items needed besides a few small screws is a plastic or aluminum kitchen bowl with a flat lip around its edge. The bowl should be about 6 inches in height. To make and install a rainproof ventilator, follow these steps.

3 page(s)

$3.50
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