Docks, Slips and Floats 

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How to Build a Boat Landing on a Muddy Shore (Pub. No. 7018)

Rot-proof fiberglass sandbags and logs of Styrofoam provide a solution.

Many boatmen do their boating in areas where facilities for landing are sometimes no more than a muddy marsh or a crumbling sand bank washed away by the river day by day. Most of these waterways never saw anything more than a canoe until the boat trailer came into general use. Alongside facilities for the new crop of boats are non-existent; they are generally too expensive for an individual to build if he uses conventional means to improve his waterfront area. I became literally bogged down in this problem not long ago when I spent a weekend with a friend at his hidden retreat. He had frontage on a lake, but we had to wade hip-deep in mud to get to the boat he anchored there. After we got aboard, carrying our clothes, we had to take a swim in deep water to clean up. And we bad to repeat this performance when we landed back at camp. Well, this was all right when I was a young lad of 30 or so, but now. . . We decided to try to find a solution. What we came up with was effective and cheap, so I think it fruitful to pass along to you.

2 page(s)

$3.50
Ramp Docking for Your Boat (Pub. No. 7032)

by Mel Berg

Here’s an inexpensive way to keep your expensive boat high and dry and out of trouble when your back is turned.

A ramp dock for your expensive fiber-glass or metal boat will keep the craft in good condition, protecting it from the hazards of dockside mooring, from damage caused by floating debris, and from the pounding, rubbing and scraping of high waves. The ramp mooring has additional advantages: your boat will be cleaner, there will be less waterline scum, and your boat will always be dry and ready to go. When the boat is parked on the ramp dock, its rear drain plug can be opened to let rain water run out instead of bailing or pumping the hulldry, an annoying procedure which is necessary when you use floating moorings. The ramp dock is a boxlike, two-section, angle-iron frame 18’ long and 4’ wide, supported at each end and in the middle by 2” pipe standards. The two 9’ wooden top deck sections are built into the angl-eiron frame and the dock is complete. This type of dock construction allows the entire dock to be removed from the water for winter storage or in case of high water, or for any other reason.

4 page(s)

$3.50
Floating Dock (Pub. No. 7037)

by Hi Sibley

Styrofoam blocks are the key to this snug offshore slip. There sure won’t be any more snooping around your boat if you make this.

By locating your dock a few yards offshore, you put your boat out of reach of inquisitive kids and meddlers. Four 2”-pipe posts driven into the bottom hold it in position better than mooring lines, and the iron brackets permit it to rise and fall with change in water levels.

2 page(s)

$3.50
All Weather Boat Shed (Pub. No. 7043)

Build and store your boat in this dual-use structure.

Here is a boat storage shed that will not only provide a weatherproof place in which to build your boat, but will also serve as a floating or stationary boat house after you have completed that dream vessl. If you own waterfront property, the shed can be pulled ashore and your boat stored in it safe and dry during the inactive winter season. for this use it might be well to cover the side walls with inexpensive polyethylene film obtainable at lumber yards.

1 page(s)

$3.50
How to Make a Marine Railway (Pub. No. 7045)

by Hi Sibley

Here’s an effective and easily-constructed project for hauling that big boat out of the water for bottom repairs or cleaning. And it’s no chore to dismantle the setup since the track is made in 10-foot sections bolted together.

In Fig. A is the layout. The dotted lines show the craft approaching the car in shallow water. In fact the car is drawn in simultaneously with the boat until it rests firmly in the cradle. Two men at the winch can draw the boat up completely out of the water.

3 page(s)

$3.50
How to Build a Diving Raft (Pub. No. 7812)

With the summer swimming season here again, people who have an opportunity to do so despite war conditions are again making plans for boating, diving and water life. Nothing adds more to water sports fun than a good raft, where “the gang” can get together and lie under “Old Sol” and absorb ultraviolet rays, or have a floating picnic, or spin yarns. To serve these merry ends, this inexpensive raft was constructed. Anyone who knows a hammer from a saw can build it. No fancy materials are needed. It can be built of scrap pieces of lumber easily obtained.

1 page(s)

$3.50
Safe Moorings for the Boat Afloat and How to Build (Pub. No. 7826)

by William D. Jackson, N.A.

Every boat, regardless of how small or inexpensive it is, deserves a home or safe mooring of some kind where it may be protected from the elements. This does not have to be an elaborate structure nor need unusual precautions taken to insure safety of boats afloat. By making simple preparations, using easily acquired materials and a little effort and ingenuity, anyone can produce safe mooring equipment which will protect hulls afloat or ashore, depending upon your particular boat and location.

3 page(s)

$3.50
Easy-to-Build Pier, An (Pub. No. 7850)

by Hi Sibley

No pile driver is needed to build this inexpensive pier with its high-and-low-tide float, as a sturdy concrete base supports one end of the telephone pole “backbone” and the wooden outer support can be floated in place and set up in a sandy bottom by a couple of swimmers. Length of the telephone pole depends on slope of the beach.

2 page(s)

$3.50
Table of Moorings (Pub. No. 7862)

by W. B. Moores

This table of mooring and buoy sizes is based on a safety-factor of four and considers the sort of anchorage, length of the boat, weight of mooring and size of rope, chain and mooring-buoy.

1 page(s)

$3.50
Polyfoam Swimming Raft (Pub. No. 7876)

This durable and unsinkable swimming raft can be assembled in just a few hours with simplest of tools. The core of the raft is two billets of "Dyfoam," expanded polystyrene foam that does not absorb water.

1 page(s)

$3.50
Build this Double-Deck boat port (Pub. No. 7903)

by Hank Clark

Here's an idea for a project that can be tackled in any number of different ways, depending on your location, boat and the amount of money available.

This deluxe boat port with its roomy sundeck high above the water was originally just a pair of rock-crib piers jutting out from the shore. They were rigid and strong enough to support the roof/sundeck structure with no problem. Thus, if you don’t have a dock, you can easily split the work into two separate projects by building the foundation rock-crib dock one season and adding the roof sometime during the following year. If you already have a similar dock layout but it isn’t strong enough to support a roof, it’s possible to build the roof structure independent of the dock. The supporting posts can either be pointed and driven into the lake bottom or cut square so as to rest on flat cement blocks or flagstones laid on the bottom. They can be secured to the existing dock with lag bolts at the inside corners of each crib. Tailor dimensions to suit the contour of the lake bottom and the size of your boat. If you want still more protection, just add walls and you have a boathouse.  

2 page(s)

$3.50
Collapsible Pneumatic Raft (Pub. No. 7914)

by Bertram Brownold

The raft illustrated measures fifty-four by fifty-four and one-half inches when in use and can be rolled into a cylinder fifty-four inches long by eight inches thick when being transported or stored. It is made of a platform of ash strips superimposed upon, and tied to, four inner tubes each of which measures twenty-seven inches in diameter when inflated. The ash strips measure 54” long, 2” wide and %“ thick. There are twenty-two of them and they are spaced one-half inch apart, being held together~by two ropes.

2 page(s)

$3.50
How to Moor the Small Boat (Pub. No. 7922)

by Sam Rabl

Insuraance statistics of marine casuallties show that over forty per cent of damages paid are caused by bad anchor devices. Many an owner will lavish money on expensive fittings for his boat and then through either ignorance or a desire to save money on an accessory that is not visible will trust her future to inferior ground tackle. There are as many kinds of anchors as there are boats; they range from the humble block of a discarded auto motor to the expensive bronze anchors of the folding type.

3 page(s)

$3.50
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