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Installing Built-in Fuel Tanks (Pub. No. 7041)

Here's how to extend the range of your power boat.

If you aleady own or are thinking of building one of the popular large outboard boats, powered with one of the new big engines, you may want to consider the advantages of built-in tanks. Extra capacity tanks will give you increased range and much more independence from gas docks. They are also considerably easier to fill. But even more important is the safety factor, since the larger tanks eliminate the need to transfer gas from one can to another during a long run. Any time gas is poured from one can to another in a boat there is an excellent chance that some of the explosive gas fumes will be trapped in the boat's bilge. If these ever ignite, you are liable to make unhappy headlines. For really good remote tank operation, outboard engines should be equipped with suction-type fuel pumps. The pressure system used on many engines works very successfully with 6-gal. portable cans, but has serious drawbacks when larger tanks are pressurized. If the fuel level is low in a 20-gal. tank, it may take half an hour to build enough pressure to get the boat in operation. So if your engine has a pressure fuel system, change it to a fuel pump, for reliable, trouble-free large tank operation. The changeover is simple to make and relatively inexpensive.

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Measuring Propeller Pitch (Pub. No. 7717)

Two methods for measuring the pitch of your own propeller.

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Install Power in your Canoe (Pub. No. 7815)

Once you’ve experienced the delight of skimming sweetly over the water in an inboard-powered canoe, you’ll never want to pick up a paddle again. And even if you get a kick out of plying the paddle, you can cover a lot more territory with a given amount of effort if there’s a smooth little inboard engine to bring you back. The arrangement shown is light in weight, doesn’t occupy much space, and best of all, it’s relatively inexpensive.

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Pump Tilt to Trim Your Outboard (Pub. No. 7870)

by Walter B. Chandler Jr.

You can make your own power-tilt mechanism for very little money.

Most outboard engines have pin holes to allow adjustments that fix the angle between your lower unit and the transom. Now the larger motors have standard or optional power-tilt arrangements to permit tilting up your prop when you’re beaching your boat or running in shallow water, trimming your lower unit for the best angle when getting up on plane and trying for the most speed or running on an even keel with various loads aboard. But if your older outboard doesn’t have a power-trim kit available, you can make your own as I did. Basic parts required are a hydraulic power pump, hydraulic cylinder, lower tilt bracket and upper tilt bracket.

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Bargain Guage for Gas Consumption (Pub. No. 7871)

by Robert D. Stearns

Ease your outboard’s offshore energy costs with this $3 jug test.

Fuel costs make knowing the gasoline consumption of your outboard more important than ever. If you can figure out in advance your most efficient cruising speed, miles per gallon and range of action on a tank of gas, you’re sure to increase your boating safety and enjoyment. Most large outboards burn about one galion per 10 hp per hour at full throttle. A 100-hp mill uses up approximately 10 gph wide open, but a 10 percent reduction in rpm can cut gas consumption by 20 percent, while an 80 percent drop in rpm may mean a 35 percent gas saving. These averages apply generally to planing hulls riding over, rather than through, the water, but they can vary greatly from boat to boat with different-size motors and loads. It’s certainly worth the small amount of time and expense, using the method shown here, to determine what your fuel requirements really are. Almost any outboard with separate fuel tank can be tested; with adaptations the system should also work for inboards.

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Find the Best Prop for Your Boat on Paper--First (Pub. No. 7874)

By Jim Martenhoff

Most boatmen understand that propeller pitch determines their boat’s performance. Too little pitch and the prop spins wastefully on an over-revving engine. Too much and the wheel (prop) slows down as the engine labors valiantly to drive it. You can play around with props on a trial-and-error basis, trying to find one that will match your boat’s hull shape, weight, and engine output. But that’s time-consuming and can be costly unless a dealer will lend you props to experiment with. Using two simple rules of thumb I’ve developed over many years, you can do the experimenting on paper with simple arithmetic .

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Make Your Boat This Twin-Engine Synchronizer (Pub. No. 7883)

You can make a twin-outboard synchronizer for under $10 that works as well as a $55 instrument, better than twin tachometers or your ears. When you tap into the hot tach leads (see sketch), AC voltage from each flywheel alternator meets at the light. The faster the bulb flickers the greater the difference in engine speeds. When speeds match, the bulb glows steadily if voltages are 180° out of phase or goes out completely if voltages are in phase. A switch limits the bulb’s use to extend its life.

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How to Figure Your Planing Speed (Pub. No. 7889)

by Jim Martenhoff

Knowing the fully loaded gross weight of a planing boat, and the horsepower, allows you to compute the probable optimum speed—-assuming the engine is tuned and delivering its rated hp, correct propeller is fitted, and the boat is properly trimmed. Here is a nomograph that tells you what top speed you can expect from your boat. If you know the hp, all you have to do is figure the gross weight, fully loaded.

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Troubleshooting an Outboard that won't start (Pub. No. 7900)

By Henry B. Notrom

Nothing defeats a boatman quicker than an outboard that refuses to start. Before you yank your arm off pulling the starter cord, or kill the battery on an electric start, take a few minutes to troubleshoot the problem.

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How to Winterize a big Outboard (Pub. No. 7901)

by Henry B. Notrom

Preparing a large outboard motor, 40 hp and up, for winter is not as hard as you might think. Here’s how you do it and save money
.

Many owners of outboard motors in the 40-hp and larger class pay good money at the end of every boating season to let someone else winterize and store their engines. The size literally scares them from doing it themselves. However, a large motor is just as simple to service as a smaller engine. And the only problem, size, is easily taken care of by buying or building an outboard stand.

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In's and Out's of Electric Starting, The (Pub. No. 7904)

by Henry B. Notrom

If your electric starting system is acting up, chances are the starter itself isn't to blame. Knowing what can go wrong is half the battle.

Here's just one big difference between your electric-starting outboard and the smaller manual-starting engine you probably traded in on it. When the manual starter, you provided the pull power needed to get the engine revving. With the electric-starting engine, the pull is provided by the starting circuit. When you turn the ignition key, electricity is fed to the starter by the battery via the solenoid. The starter is nothing more than an electric motor which converts the electricity it receives to mechanical energy. The electricity spins and sends forward a shaft in the starter, at the end of which is a gear called the pinion drive. This engages the flywheel causing it to spin and start the engine. Once the engine starts, the pinion disengages, the starter comes to a peaceful halt and it lies at rest until needed again. It's as simple as that.  In spite of this, however, trouble can develope in the starting circuit. There are generally only five possibilities to check out.

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Winterize Your Outboard (Pub. No. 7905)

by Henry R. Notrom

Planning to use your motor this winter? Here's how to set it up for cold-weather operation.

This may surprise a lot of summertime skippers, but many people north of the Maxon-Dixon Line run their boats right through the winter. Actually, there's no real reason why your outboard should go into storage the minute the weather turns cold. It'll troll just as well under freezing conditions as it did back in July. And on a crisp clear December afternoon, even a plain old boat ride can turn out to be a lot of fun. It's like a two-cycle sleigh ride.

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Troubleshooting Remote Controls (Pub. No. 7906)

by Henry B. Notrom

You're more likely to have trouble with the cable than the box, but here's the A-B-C procedure for finding out what's wrong and how to put it right.

The great thing about trouble-shooting remote controls is that they're relatively simple gadgets. Nine times out of ten, you can locate the cause of a malfunction by checking a couple of critical areas. The key to finding out what's wrong lies in following a set and orderly procedure. With so many different remote-control units on today's market, however, it's impossible to give specific trouble-shooting information on every single one. Thus, we'll cover the possible areas of failure in any control and let you apply this to your particular unit, wheter it's single or dual-lever, mechanical or electrical.

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Troubleshooting Your Outboard by Ear (Pub. No. 7908)

by Henry B. Notrom

Don't turn a deaf ear when your engine tries to tell you something. Lean to understand its complaints and you can save a potful of money.

Like waves slapping the hull or wind whistling past the windshield, the quiet purr of a well-tuned outboard is a sound your ear tends to ignore. It's part of the normal background noise of boating. But let that engine start missing or knocking and suddenly it drowns out everything else. It's like a cry for help. Being able to understand your engine's distress calls can save you time, trouble, money, or all three, depending on just how serious the problem happens to be. Often it's something minor--just a matter of tightening a bolt or resetting an adjustment--but it may be an early warning of a critical malfunction.

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Starting a Stubborn Outboard (Pub. No. 7910)

by Henry B. Notrom

There you sit in the middle of the lake. You've been fishing, it's getting dark and you want to go home. But your engine won't start.

Cheer up. According tot he outboard manufactuerers, a little simple trouble-shooting will solve your problem in nine out of ten cases. The question is, where to you begin. There are some 20 failings that can keep an outboard from starting, so you'll have to follow a logical, step-by-step procedure to find the one troubling your engine.

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Auto/Marine Conversion Question, The (Pub. No. 7912)

by Sam Rabl

We have received quite a number of letters asking our opinion and advice on installing an automobile engine in a boat. We have often stated that it could be done satisfactorily and on several occasions have been severely criticized after doing so because such and such a contemporary magazine devoted exclusively to boating condemns the practice. We have read articles in these magazines that have actually made us afraid to ride behind the auto engine in its native element! Let us analyze this situation and see why the boating magazines will condemn the installation of an auto engine while hundreds of auto engines after several years of use ashore will go out and earn a living for some poor tidewater fisherman. We will find part of the answer in the costly ads carried by the marine motor manufacturers in the pages of these magazines, yet, paradoxical as it seems, we will find a small sprinkling of ads for conversion parts for auto engines in the same issue that condemns the practice of using them! Let me say at the start that if I had a free choice between auto and marine engines I would choose the marine, but this would not stop me from putting a converted auto engine in my boat until such a time as I could afford a real marine motor. Auto engines were designed for a specific purpose, just as were marine and aviation engines, but auto engines have flown, and aviation engines have driven boats, so there you are! My first piece of advice on the installation of an auto engine in a boat is to install as few home-made conversion parts as necessary to make a satisfactory installation. It has been my experience that it is the conversion gadgets that give the mostt trouble. Most of the fisherman installations use only a water pump and a universal joint. These installations are going out daily and doing their stuff in a manner that disproves for all time the old bunk that an auto-engine will not work in a boat. All the rot that has been written on the subject can be nullified by one visit to any fishing village and hearing the fishermen brag of their Fords, Chevvys and Buicks, and they are not talking about their cars but their boat motors.

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Conditioning that Good Engine (Pub. No. 7919)

by Charles R. Peyton

The necessary steps in preparing your motor for the winter lay-up are as follows: First, drain all the water out of the cooling system, as in Fig. 1. For simplicity of illustration, a single-cylinder engine is represented in diagram, and the principle involved is the same for all types of marine engines. Next, disconnect salt-water intake, attach a hose, immerse it in a bucket of fresh water and start the engine to pump through and flush the entire system, cylinder jacket, piping, etc. Run several buckets through (Fig. 2), and finish up with a quart or so of kerosene. This will leave a protecting film in the cast-iron jacket as well as in other parts of the cooling system (3). A good marine engine will last twenty years and more if given proper care and is overhauled every year. The photograph illustrates a sturdy one-cylinder that has had exceedingly rough going and yet, after an annual overhauling runs better each succeeding year—and with negligible expense for replacements.

3 page(s)

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