Cruising & Seamanship

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How to Make a Race Starting Clock (Pub. No. 7721)

by Jack Ryan

The problem of providing a good readable starting clock is of major concern to regatta committees. Often enough a local racing group has to borrow a clock from some neighboring community, unaware of the fact that construction of such equipment is fairly simple and that it is a decided convenience to have one locally. While it is possible to build a satisfactory starting clock that is operated by a phonograph motor or other mechanical device, ranking officials in the two national inboard and outboard boating associations are uniform in their agreement that a simple, nianually operated clock is best. The reasons for this opinion, based on racing events conducted over a period of many years, are that a clock must stand much weather abuse which is not particularly helpful to a mechanical drive, and the “works” have a habit of going temperamental at the crucial moment.

1 page(s)

$3.50
Building a Shadow Pelorus and Compensating Compass (Pub. No. 7772)

Compass compensating aboard a boat is performed by running reciprocal courses. With the compass on a book that was rotated 180 degrees on the table, you were, in effect, running reciprocal courses indoors. To run a reciprocal course on the water, you reverse your boat’s heading by 180 degrees so that if you were originally heading north, your reciprocal course will be south. Here's how to use a home-made Shadow Pelorus to help you do this accurately.

4 page(s)

$3.50
Compensating the Compass at Home (Pub. No. 7788)

No one is perfect and that applies to compass readings as well as to the people who take them. Often, compass error is not so much the fault of the instrument as it is the “company” it keeps—tachometer, radio, and depth sounder, to say nothing of a screwdriver, pliers, and other ferrous metal objects carelessly placed nearby. These and other things can cause deviation errors because they cause the compass to stray from a true magnetic reading. A classic example of this type of error, or deviation, is the deer hunter who checked his hand compass without laying his rifle aside. At the end of the day, he discovered he had been traveling in a circle. Electrical wiring near a compass also can create problems, especially if it is a single wire with direct current flowing through it. Twisting single wire circuits around one another will cancel out these interfering magnetic fields and help avoid this type of compass error. Everyone knows that north is at the North Pole, geographically speaking. Navigators refer to this direction as true north. But there also is the magnetic North Pole. A compass in good working condition will indicate the magnetic North Pole, unless there are shipboard magnetic disturbances to cause it to deviate. Before you install the compass on your boat, you can check its operation indoors.

2 page(s)

$3.50
Elements of Navigation for the Beginner (Pub. No. 7839)

by John Farr

Generally when the subject of navigation is broached to most small boat owners, they conjure a vision of complicated instruments, complicated tables and a picture of the navigator as a super-human mathematician to whom Einstein is a rank amateur. There need be no fear on the subject of higher education being necessary to understand how to get around on the sea and know at all times just where you are, when you consider the fact that very few of the captains in command of the world’s steamers today had any higher than a high school education. The most complicated problem in navigation uses mathematics no higher than trigonometry, and most of the problems can be worked with simple addition and subtraction. In fact, all the problems necessary for small boat navigation may be solved by the latter method.

4 page(s)

$3.50
Anchoring Small Craft (Pub. No. 7841)

by William D. Jackson

You'll spend more time aboard your boat and enjoy anchoring wherever you wish with properly selected, low-cost ground tackle and the know-how of quick, safe anchoring.

If you are an average small-boat fan, your present boat is roomier, more comfortably equipped, and better looking than the one you might have owned five or ten years ago—all of which leads to your having more fun just being aboard and puts less emphasis on high-speed performance. You’ve probably been thinking about spending a night camping on your small boat and perhaps you’ve already taken a short cruise in the evening just to anchor and have dinner aboard, have an over-the-side swim, or do a little fishing. And, if you’re a skin diver or scuba fan, you know that you get most of your enjoyment from your boat after you’ve reached your destination and the boat is anchored. These are all reasons why you should give considerable thought to your method of anchoring and to your ground tackle, most of which wasn’t necessary back when a boat was just something to ride over the water. Although present-day anchors are more sophisticated and versatile than the concrete block on a rope that you used years ago, you can still outfit your runabout, small cruiser, or houseboat with ground tackle, depending somewhat on your selection of anchors and line and their intended use, for little money.

4 page(s)

$3.50
Shooting Sun and Stars with a Sextant (Pub. No. 7920)

by Sam Rabl

Why get lost? Navigation is really easy to learn and will make you a real sailor.

Generally, when the subject of navigation is broached to most small boat owners, they conjure a vision of complicated instruments, complicated tables and a picture of the navigator as a super-human mathematician to whom Einstein is a rank amateur. There need be no fear on the subject of higher education being necessary to understand how to get around on the sea and know at all times just where you are, when you consider the fact that very few of the captains in command of the world’s steamers today had any higher than a high school education. The most complicated problem in navigation uses mathematics no higher than trigonometry, and most of the problems can be worked with simple addition and substraction. In fact, all the problems necessary for small boat navigation may be solved by the latter method.

4 page(s)

$3.50
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