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Building a Shadow Pelorus and Compensating Compass (Pub. No. 7772)

Compass compensating aboard a boat is performed by running reciprocal courses. With the compass on a book that was rotated 180 degrees on the table, you were, in effect, running reciprocal courses indoors. To run a reciprocal course on the water, you reverse your boat’s heading by 180 degrees so that if you were originally heading north, your reciprocal course will be south. Here's how to use a home-made Shadow Pelorus to help you do this accurately.

4 page(s)

$3.50
Compensating the Compass at Home (Pub. No. 7788)

No one is perfect and that applies to compass readings as well as to the people who take them. Often, compass error is not so much the fault of the instrument as it is the “company” it keeps—tachometer, radio, and depth sounder, to say nothing of a screwdriver, pliers, and other ferrous metal objects carelessly placed nearby. These and other things can cause deviation errors because they cause the compass to stray from a true magnetic reading. A classic example of this type of error, or deviation, is the deer hunter who checked his hand compass without laying his rifle aside. At the end of the day, he discovered he had been traveling in a circle. Electrical wiring near a compass also can create problems, especially if it is a single wire with direct current flowing through it. Twisting single wire circuits around one another will cancel out these interfering magnetic fields and help avoid this type of compass error. Everyone knows that north is at the North Pole, geographically speaking. Navigators refer to this direction as true north. But there also is the magnetic North Pole. A compass in good working condition will indicate the magnetic North Pole, unless there are shipboard magnetic disturbances to cause it to deviate. Before you install the compass on your boat, you can check its operation indoors.

2 page(s)

$3.50
Elements of Navigation for the Beginner (Pub. No. 7839)

by John Farr

Generally when the subject of navigation is broached to most small boat owners, they conjure a vision of complicated instruments, complicated tables and a picture of the navigator as a super-human mathematician to whom Einstein is a rank amateur. There need be no fear on the subject of higher education being necessary to understand how to get around on the sea and know at all times just where you are, when you consider the fact that very few of the captains in command of the world’s steamers today had any higher than a high school education. The most complicated problem in navigation uses mathematics no higher than trigonometry, and most of the problems can be worked with simple addition and subtraction. In fact, all the problems necessary for small boat navigation may be solved by the latter method.

4 page(s)

$3.50
Shooting Sun and Stars with a Sextant (Pub. No. 7920)

by Sam Rabl

Why get lost? Navigation is really easy to learn and will make you a real sailor.

Generally, when the subject of navigation is broached to most small boat owners, they conjure a vision of complicated instruments, complicated tables and a picture of the navigator as a super-human mathematician to whom Einstein is a rank amateur. There need be no fear on the subject of higher education being necessary to understand how to get around on the sea and know at all times just where you are, when you consider the fact that very few of the captains in command of the world’s steamers today had any higher than a high school education. The most complicated problem in navigation uses mathematics no higher than trigonometry, and most of the problems can be worked with simple addition and substraction. In fact, all the problems necessary for small boat navigation may be solved by the latter method.

4 page(s)

$3.50
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