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Fisherman (Pub. No. 7003)

by Charles Bell

LOA 12', BEAM 5'

Fisherman was designed with one purpose in mind—fishing.

Although she has a planing type bottom, she is not intended for high-horsepower motors—10 to 15 will do nicely and some of you, undoubtedly, will use a 20. Only 12 feet in length but of good beam, she will be easy to get in and out of the water and will be comfortable to work a line in, in most sheltered lakes and rivers—no rapids, please; leave those to the professional stunt men and the boats designed for them.

4 page(s)

$3.50
Mackerel--A 16-Foot Family Type Outboard Runabout (Pub. No. 7050)

Designed by Charles G. MacGregor

LOA 15 ft. 8 in., BEAM 4 ft. 3 in., DEPTH 1 ft. 11 in.

This is a design of a popular type of small family runabout, using any one of the small outboard motors from about 6 hp, up to 10 hp. This little craft will carry as many as eight passengers, and if not overloaded will attain speeds up to 15    m.p.h., depending on the power used. By making slight alterations to the hull-structure a small air-cooled inboard motor can be used. Waterproof plywood is used throughout where possible and feasible. Panels can be obtained -in 16' lengths without a splice or butt, and this is recommended. However, if these panels are not readily available in your locality, do not hesitate to use shorter lengths and make a butt.

2 page(s)

$3.50
Pioneer (Pub. No. 7052)

Designed by Charles MacGregor

LOA 15 ft., 6 in., BEAM, 5 ft. 7 1/2 in., Draft 1 ft. 4 in.

The possibilities of the trailer-cruiser as a companion to the automobile in opening up more extensive cruising vistas to the man of average means will be more and more apparent as time goes on. The remarkably enthusiastic reception given to resin bonded plywood boats by the boating public in the last few years will go far toward making this possible. We can now build stronger, lighter and in many ways better boats than was possible by the old-fashioned conventional method. We have at hand new material and methods of building small boats, scorned by some old time builders but readily accepted and adopted by the more progressive and younger element of far-seeing builders. Further than this, the construction can be made so simple as to make it possible far the home builder to construct his own boat without any previous experience as a boat builder. It is possible for him to butld a small floating home, one that can be stored in a garage, hauled overland on a trailer to practically any part of the continent over our splendid system of highways; then from a chosen point launch this little cruiser and explore rivers, and-bays hitherto inaccessible. We will then have for such summer cruising the coast of Maine, the St. Lawrence River, the Thousand Islands, Georgian Bay Bay and its 30,000 islands (a cruising paradise) Muskoka Lakes, the Minnesota lakes, Mississippi River, Florida and the inland waterways route and the new huge man-made lakes formed by the dam projects in the west. It is with all this in mind that I have prepared this design. It is one that can be built by an owner-builder and that will he capable of carrying him safely on many happy and delightful cruises in unexplored territory. This boat which I have chosen to call Pioneer is built of waterproof plywood where practicable. As an open launch it is roomy, strong, yet light enough to be handled on a trailer. It will be very suitable for use as a fishing boat or for a party of about six persona for day cruising. The form is such that it can be easily and economically driven at speeds up to seven miles an hour with either a small outboard motor or one of the many air-cooled or water-cooled inboard motors now on the market at very moderate prices.

4 page(s)

$3.50
Crawfish--A Tunnel Stern Motorboat (Pub. No. 7056)

Designed by Wifliam F. Crosby

LOA 15 ft. 6 in., BEAM 4 ft. 8 in., DRAFT 4 ft. 1/2 in.

The little boat shown here is designed for protected waters where the bottom is close to the top. The draft figure includes the rudder and propeller.
As you can easily see she is a tunnel stern boat equipped with a little marine engine not to exceed 4 hp, at the outside. The engine shown is only 21/2 hp. She is not built for speed as no tunnel stern boat can be driven at high speed. Being a flat bottom type, she is not meant to go to sea in either. She would make an ideal fishing boat for some shallow pond or lake. She should weigh a little over 600 pounds complete with engine, propeller, etc. The weights of engine, tanks, seats, etc., should be placed in the hull as shown in order to have her trim properly. The tunnel for the propeller is large enough to take any wheel up to twelve inches in diameter--which is more than ample. The angle up to the top of the propeller and down to the stern should be as shown. Do not make the mistake of running the tunnel directly out to the stern even with the highest point of the tunnel. If you do, it will not pick up the water and your propeller will be revolving mostly in air. The construction offers wide possibilities in choice of materials: The materials specified are those most suited. Others may be used but don't try to use a soft wood such as redwood and expect fastenings to stay in it. Plywood; (waterproof) may be used almost throughout with the exception of frames and the bed pieces to which the engine is actually, mounted. If you use waterproof plywood, you can reduce the thickness by about one-half from the material specified as it is at least 40 per cent stronger than ordinary wood.

4 page(s)

$3.50
Skua--An 8-Foot All Plywood Outboard Skimmer (Pub. No. 7061)

Designed by Charles G. MacGregor

LOA 7 ft. 9 in., BEAM 3 ft. 10 in.

To those who love the thrills of speed on water we submit here a small outboard skimmer which if carefully built will give her owner a great deal of pleasure. There is a splendid choice of suitable outboard engines developing 3 to 30 hp. Most of these motors run efficiently at speeds between 3,500 and 4,000 r.p.m. and as high as 5,000. It is not necessary to use a steering wheel but it is a great convenience. Keep the tiller lines well clear of the open cockpit so that they will not be in the way when turning from cranking to steering position. The seat should be arranged to suit your own needs or eliminated

4 page(s)

$3.50
Rigging a Small Power Boat for Water Skiing (Pub. No. 7730)

The professional way to rig a ski boat is to install a deck pylon in the cockpit. Several kinds of pylons are available. Most have legs that mount on fittings to form a sturdy tripod. The pylon is quickly detachable and folds for stowage. So, if you use your boat as an all-purpose family craft, for picnicking and fishing as well as skiing, it makes the boat quickly convertible. The advantage of a ski pylon is that it adds stability to the boat by moving the center of effort forward to the center of the craft, keeps the tow line high and clear of the motor, and reduces sudden slack in the line when a skier is maneuvering back and forth. Here's how to do it!

3 page(s)

$3.50
Sport--A V-Bottom, Air-Cooled, Inboard in Plywood (Pub. No. 7818)

Sport is a V-bottomed inboard ideally designed for fishing on bays, lakes or streams. The boat is relatively fast and holds four persons comfortably. The air-cooled motor can be from 21/2 to 6 hp.

4 page(s)

$3.50
How to Build Water Skis (Pub. No. 7851)

by Hi Sibley

All steps for making the skis are shown on these two pages.

2 page(s)

$3.50
12' Skiff Specially Designed for an Outboard, A (Pub. No. 7852)

This boat is convenient and useful for rough work, or it may be used as a tender, while on account of its flat keelless bottom and almost straight run it can be easily driven by an outboard motor. It is a fine weather boat very suitable for shallow water and is light enough to be readily hauled up and down on beaches.

2 page(s)

$3.50
Building a 13-Foot Skiff (Pub. No. 7853)

While this skiff will carry three persons easily and safely, it was primarily designed for the person who likes to go out alone and ride the waves when the ordinary has to stay in. The designer built one for himself, used it on Lake Michigan, and found it exceptionally satisfactory in every way. For her size she is extremely seaworthy, and a wonderful surf boat--she has repeatedly come in through the surf when boats twice her size would not tackle it.

2 page(s)

$3.50
Building a 19-Foot Tunnel-Stern Boat (Pub. No. 7854)

The following boat has been used on the Mississippi River for two seasons and has been very satisfactory. She was designed especially for river use and draws only twelve inches of water. She is a flat-bottomed boat, but when she is in the water this is not noticeable, and, with her long front deck, is a very classy-looking craft. The cockpit is large and the lockers have ample room in them to stow everything that is necessary. The engine, being under the front deck, is out of the way, with no danger of engine trouble from rain or spray; there is also lots of room for engine supplies, making it possible to keep the cockpit and lockers clean. She is easy to build, even the tunnel, as shown, being very simple. Any one who can saw a board or drive a nail can build her.

3 page(s)

$3.50
Building a 151/2-Foot Useful Sharpie for Power (Pub. No. 7855)

Two-in-one is a practical little boat intended for all-around service. She is a motor boat in every sense of the word and, as shown, fitted with sail and centerboard, makes an ideal craft for the man with the summer cottage or the chap who enjoys short party sails and fishing trips.

4 page(s)

$3.50
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