Sail Boat Plans

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Bubbles (Pub. No. 7001)

by Charles Bell

LOA 8',  DEPTH 20". BEAM 4', WEIGHT 100 lbs.

Here is a dinghy which should meet the requirements of most yachtsmen who want a light but stable dinghy.

Capable of carrying three adults while being rowed, but one which can be sailed for fun in quiet harbors as well. She weighs 100 lbs., is only eight feet long, 20” deep and four feet wide and she is about as simple as a boat can be to build. BUBBLES can be built using either of two methods. The first is the much talked-about Bubble Mold, a mold method which uses a bubble of air and is explained in the article.

4 page(s)

$3.50
Wendy Third (Pub. No. 7002)

by Charles Bell

LOA 10', BEAM 51", DRAFT Approx. 6"

Wendy Third is a further development of her predecessors, Wendy and Wendy Two.

These two class racers were such successful performers that further development of building methods was considered to bring construction of this popular class within the scope of any home builder with ordinary skills as well as for the more expert among us. The lines are the same as before with certain refinements to ease lamination of the sheer and chine pieces.

4 page(s)

$3.50
Sailing Dinghy of Plyfoam (Pub. No. 7010)

by Charles Bell

With brand new lightweight plyfoam, the home builder’s task and tools are minimized.

Would-be home builders with more spirit than skill for that sailing dink, take heart. And take a hard look at a new core material called Plyfoam, a rigid polyvinyl chloride developed by the firm of Potter Instruments Inc., Plainview, N.Y. for use in “sandwich” construction. Marketed in sheets of 1/4” and 1/2” thickness, it’s intended for use with polyester or epoxy plastics, and with a variety of reinforcing materials of which the most commonly used is fiberglass. With this in mind, I’ve designed a sailing dinghy which will weigh about 50 pounds, but which is stronger than a comparable plywood dink. Even, a conventional fiberglass hull would have to be far heavier to be as stiff and sturdy. It will carry heavy loads in a breeze and be quite lively for one or two people to sail. Outside of the form or building jig, the Plyfoam, fiberglass and resin require a minimum of tools—a brush, razor blades and pair of scissors will do the trick.

4 page(s)

$3.50
Skippy (Pub. No. 7049)

by Charles G. MacGregor

LOA 11 ft. 8 in., BEAM 5 ft., DRAFT BOARD DOWN, 3 ft., SAIL AREA 72 sq. ft., WEIGHT about 160 lbs.

Following is a list of the material required to build this boat. Many of the smaller items such as seat cleats, etc., are not included in this list but they can be made from scraps. Also where 1 inch thickness is specified for floors it is intended that 7/8 inch or better should be used, as much as can be obtained from the 1 inch rough stock after it is dressed. If preferred, Philippine mahogany or African mahogany may be used in all members. Do not however use oak on a glued watertight seam.

4 page(s)

$3.50
Pup--A 12-Foot Cat (Pub. No. 7053)

Designed by William F. Crosby

LOA 12 ft., BEAM 5 ft., DRAFT (board down) 3 ft. 6", SAIL AREA 60 sq. ft.

The plan for the little boat presented herewith makes use of plywood throughout except for the keel, chine pieces and clamps. The sides may each be made in one piece and the bottom may be composed of two pieces, one for each side. The fact that it is only 1/4 inch thick need cause no concern because this is actually stronger than the material usually used in boats of this type. The skin of the boat is also reinforced by five sawn plywood frames and intermediate frames and stringers that leave but little of the surface unsupported. Before going any further, we wish to point out the fact that ordinary plywood is not suitable and will not stand up when used this way. The material must be Resin Bonded Waterproof plywood in which the bonding agent between the plys is phenolformaldehyde. It is highly important to use this type material for ordinary plywoods will buckle and separate in no time. The little boat is 12 feet long and 5 feet wide. She is a vee-bottom, having a very slight vee, and is rigged as a Marconi cat. The only real weight in connection with the hull is in the center-board and it is highly important to follow the specified material and size closely. Iron, not being as heavy as bronze, should not be used unless it is at least 1/16 inch thicker. It will be noted that there is no external keel on this hull. Instead the two bottom pieces of plywood come right down to the centerline where they are mitred together. For the entire length of the boat an inside keel is used the under side of which is veed downward to the exact angle that the bottom pieces form. A small molding may be used to cover the seam in the bottom pieces, but it is not necessary.

4 page(s)

$3.50
15-Foot Keel Knockabout--Breeze, The (Pub. No. 7054)

Designed by Charles G. MacGregor

LOA 15 ft. 8 in., BEAM 5 ft., DRAFT 2 ft. 6 in., SAIL AREA 111 sq. ft.

Here is presented the design of a plywood fin keel sloop.

This boat is intended for the more ambitious builder in plywood. She is suitable for day sailing and racing; can be easily transported by trailer, and if necessary the fin keel may be removed in a few minutes by backing out the keel bolts. The material specified is intended for salt water use, and substitutions are not recommended without competent advice. The form of the hull is such that no difficulty will be experienced in bending the "planking." The twist at the forefoot of the usual vee bottom form has been eliminated by adopting the skiff form of bow adapted to the conical stem. This conical stem not only adds to the appearance of the boat but permits a certain amount of flare and eliminates the necessity of twisting the forward end of the topside planking into a vertical plane which occurs when the ordinary stem is used. The bottom is slightly vee form. It had been suggested that an arc bottom be used similar to the Star class hull. This would be excellent but it is practical only within certain definite limitations of panel length and width. For instance a 3/8" panel 42" wide and 25' long may be given a transverse arc of 21/2" and a longitudinal arc or upsweep of about 5" at each end. Beyond this point the plywood will crimp along the edges. The arc form is therefore impractical in a boat of the size and type of Breeze. The vee bottom was adopted in preference to a flat bottom. It is a little more difficult to build but its advantages in this type of boat are well worth the extra trouble.

4 page(s)

$3.50
Jacana--A Skiff for Racing or Day Sailing (Pub. No. 7058)

Designed by Charles G. MacGregor

LOA 14 ft. 6 in., BEAM 4' 8 in., DRAFT C.B. 3 ft., SAIL AREA 96 sq. ft.

Jacana is a fine looking, modern boat of nice form, being stable, fast and relatiuely easily built and she has no hard nips anywhere in her and was laid out, of course, especially to take waterproof plywood planking. The fixed draft of the boat wlaen the rudder is in place (to the bottom of the rudder, in other words), is about 14 inches.    She carries, 96 square feet of sail which is plenty because she is a light boat. It looks like more because the plan is so well balanced: The sail is divided up as follows: mainsail 71 square feet jib 25 square feet. It is passible to carry a larger overlapping jib which would be the same hoist as the working jib but 7 feet 9 inches along the foot. Your sailmaker can lay it out from those dimensions if you show him this sail plan.

4 page(s)

$3.50
How to Build Peanut (Pub. No. 7701)

by W.F. Crosby

Complete instructions for building a lap-streak dinghy. May be built 9, 10 or 11 feet long. Will work out well with a sail.

The construction of a small, light round-bottom dinghy such as Peanut is one that calls for some skill in the use of wood working tools, a degree of patience and the ability to read and understand the plans furnished herewith. While not as easy to build as the ordinary flat-bottom type of dinghy, the lapstreak round-bottom job has considerably more class and is always in demand by yachtsmen.

3 page(s)

$3.50
Pup (Pub. No. 7789)

by William F. Crosby

A small, neat, plywood catboat that can serve triple duty as a rowboat, outboard tender or as a fine sailer.

The plan for the little boat presented herewith makes use of plywood throughout except for the keel, chine pieces and clamps. The sides may each be made in one piece and the bottom may be composed of two pieces, one for each side. The skin of the boat is also reinforced by five sawed plywood frames and intermediate frames and stringers that leave but little of the surface unsupported.

4 page(s)

$3.50
Moth Class Racing Skimmer (Pub. No. 7792)

Designed by William F. Crosby

This simple little skimmer is about as easy a boat to build as anyone could ask for. There is all straight work in her—with no steambending, or any severe twists to the planking or any other parts. The Moth boats are not one-design boats and the majority of them are rounded, or partly rounded, bottom construction. But no hull form is specified in the rules and this easy-to-build modified vee-bottom that you see here is acceptable and far easier to construct than any other.

3 page(s)

$3.50
Meteor Class Knockabout (Pub. No. 7793)

Designed by Charles D. Mower

This is a fast sailer originally designed as a one-design class for a well-known eastern yacht club and a good many were built. It is a vee-bottomed boat suitable for two or three when racing and the same number when just knocking around. The boat is quite stiff and fast and handles nicely. It is a little wet when slogging to windward in a chop but any small boat is, more or less

2 page(s)

$3.50
Swampscott Racing Dory (Pub. No. 7794)

Designed by Charles D. Mower

The sailing dory, properly designed, makes as fine a boat as anyone could wish. The so-called “Swampscott” style—that is, with rounded sides—makes the better and more stable boat as the common Banks fishing dory has little stability under sail unless heavily loaded. Here we have plans of one of the famous Massachusetts racing dories that were so popular a number of years ago and are still sailed in some sections. They are not as stylish as they once were but they make very fast boats and are lively to sail. This particular boat is fairly narrow and is quite easy to drive but she is not suitable for a family of six who wish to go out for a quiet drift around on a Saturday afternoon.

3 page(s)

$3.50
Yawl Spray, The (Lines Only) (Pub. No. 7795)

by C. Andrade, Jr.

“I did not know the center of effort in her sails, except as it hit me in practice at sea, nor did I care a rope yarn about it. Mathematical calculations however are all right in a good boat, and Spray could have stood them. She was easily balanced and easily kept in trim.” With these words Captain Joshua Slocum dismisses the technique of Spray’s design. Considering the unparalleled performances of this little boat, it is remarkable that no one has attempted an analysis of her lines and sail plan.

2 page(s)

$3.50
Sandspur, A Garvey (Pub. No. 7796)

by Gidge Gandy

This slightly refined garvey, of approximately 16 feet overall length, has a beam of 3 feet at the bows, 5 feet at midsection and 3 feet 6 inches at the transom. The draft is approximately 4 inches. Her sides are 16 inches from deck to bottom and they flare 6 inches, which gives her a bottom of 4 feet 6 inches breadth at the midsection. Although the old garvies carried the conventional gaff cat rig, I prefer the sprit leg-o’-mutton sail once used on the Mosquito and Cricket boats of Atlantic City. No stay or shrouds are used with such a rig and the butt of the mast is soaped or greased so it will turn and allow the sail to pull the slide to leeward. The forward end of the sprit is supported by an outhaul which leads to a cleat at the after end of the centerboard trunk, permitting adjustment of the draft of the sail at any time.

2 page(s)

$3.50
Tramp--A 15-Ft. Knockabout in Plywood (Pub. No. 7819)

Any sailboat fancier will like “Tramp,” the trim, 15-ft. knockabout that’s so easy to build in plywood.

2 page(s)

$3.50
Skippy--A 11-ft 8 inch Plywood Sailboat (Pub. No. 7840)

by George Muir

A plywood sailboat 11 feet 8 inches long

2 page(s)

$3.50
Sailing Dinghy--Snowbird (Pub. No. 7844)

Designed by Charles D. Mower.

Snow Bird is a smart sailing dinghy of a type similar to those used in “Frostbite” racing during the winter season in eastern clubs. In fact she was designed to the rules of a certain class a few years ago but the classification no longer exists. She is a practical boat, will carry a good load under oars, tows well, is light to hoist aboard and can be used with the smaller, lighter outboards of not over 3 hp. She is the perfect all-around yacht tender, and makes a handsome boat. The round-bottomed clinker built construction is difficult for the amateur but it makes the strongest light boat one can build.

2 page(s)

$3.50
Vee Bottom Center Board Cat (Pub. No. 7845)

Designed by Edson B. Schock

LOA 11 ft. 111/4 in., BEAM 4 ft. 11 in., DRAFT OF HULL 45/8 in., SAIL AREA 95 sq. Ft.

Here is a little boat that will really sail, is easy to build and is a good looking little craft. She is the perfect one-design racing boat for a crew of one but could be sailed with two. Her rig is simplicity itself and is very efficient and she is quite lively under canvas. The moderate deadrise, or vee of the bottom and the forward rake of the stem make for easy planking. A stem that rakes forward calls for less twist in the forward planks as they are naturally bowed out to meet the stem line when they reach the forward sections.

2 page(s)

$3.50
Simple Little Sailing Skiff, A (Pub. No. 7846)

Designed by L.J. Gorenflo

The average sailing skiff is a poor performer but this little packet here skitters along pretty well and having a good-sized efficient dagger type center-board goes to windward well for her kind. She sails best with one but can carry two well enough. She is designed to be sailed with the helmsman sitting on the bottom aft. The boat is very simple to build and with the drawings here, and bill of material, anyone could build one. In building this boat you set up the moulds shown, as well as stem and transom (or stern board), and plank her up. After she is planked the frames are put in and the moulds removed. This is standard rowboat practice.

2 page(s)

$3.50
75-Square Foot Ice Boat (Pub. No. 7869)

by Edson I. Schock

This small ice yacht was designed to fit the 75 square-foot racing class. While the woodwork on her is very simple, there is quite a bit of machine work to be done, and the prospective builder should be able to do this, or have facilities available to do it for him.

4 page(s)

$3.50
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