Daysailers 10' to 15' LOA 

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Skippy (Pub. No. 7049)

by Charles G. MacGregor

LOA 11 ft. 8 in., BEAM 5 ft., DRAFT BOARD DOWN, 3 ft., SAIL AREA 72 sq. ft., WEIGHT about 160 lbs.

Following is a list of the material required to build this boat. Many of the smaller items such as seat cleats, etc., are not included in this list but they can be made from scraps. Also where 1 inch thickness is specified for floors it is intended that 7/8 inch or better should be used, as much as can be obtained from the 1 inch rough stock after it is dressed. If preferred, Philippine mahogany or African mahogany may be used in all members. Do not however use oak on a glued watertight seam.

4 page(s)

$3.50
Pup--A 12-Foot Cat (Pub. No. 7053)

Designed by William F. Crosby

LOA 12 ft., BEAM 5 ft., DRAFT (board down) 3 ft. 6", SAIL AREA 60 sq. ft.

The plan for the little boat presented herewith makes use of plywood throughout except for the keel, chine pieces and clamps. The sides may each be made in one piece and the bottom may be composed of two pieces, one for each side. The fact that it is only 1/4 inch thick need cause no concern because this is actually stronger than the material usually used in boats of this type. The skin of the boat is also reinforced by five sawn plywood frames and intermediate frames and stringers that leave but little of the surface unsupported. Before going any further, we wish to point out the fact that ordinary plywood is not suitable and will not stand up when used this way. The material must be Resin Bonded Waterproof plywood in which the bonding agent between the plys is phenolformaldehyde. It is highly important to use this type material for ordinary plywoods will buckle and separate in no time. The little boat is 12 feet long and 5 feet wide. She is a vee-bottom, having a very slight vee, and is rigged as a Marconi cat. The only real weight in connection with the hull is in the center-board and it is highly important to follow the specified material and size closely. Iron, not being as heavy as bronze, should not be used unless it is at least 1/16 inch thicker. It will be noted that there is no external keel on this hull. Instead the two bottom pieces of plywood come right down to the centerline where they are mitred together. For the entire length of the boat an inside keel is used the under side of which is veed downward to the exact angle that the bottom pieces form. A small molding may be used to cover the seam in the bottom pieces, but it is not necessary.

4 page(s)

$3.50
Jacana--A Skiff for Racing or Day Sailing (Pub. No. 7058)

Designed by Charles G. MacGregor

LOA 14 ft. 6 in., BEAM 4' 8 in., DRAFT C.B. 3 ft., SAIL AREA 96 sq. ft.

Jacana is a fine looking, modern boat of nice form, being stable, fast and relatiuely easily built and she has no hard nips anywhere in her and was laid out, of course, especially to take waterproof plywood planking. The fixed draft of the boat wlaen the rudder is in place (to the bottom of the rudder, in other words), is about 14 inches.    She carries, 96 square feet of sail which is plenty because she is a light boat. It looks like more because the plan is so well balanced: The sail is divided up as follows: mainsail 71 square feet jib 25 square feet. It is passible to carry a larger overlapping jib which would be the same hoist as the working jib but 7 feet 9 inches along the foot. Your sailmaker can lay it out from those dimensions if you show him this sail plan.

4 page(s)

$3.50
Sandspur, A Garvey (Pub. No. 7796)

by Gidge Gandy

This slightly refined garvey, of approximately 16 feet overall length, has a beam of 3 feet at the bows, 5 feet at midsection and 3 feet 6 inches at the transom. The draft is approximately 4 inches. Her sides are 16 inches from deck to bottom and they flare 6 inches, which gives her a bottom of 4 feet 6 inches breadth at the midsection. Although the old garvies carried the conventional gaff cat rig, I prefer the sprit leg-o’-mutton sail once used on the Mosquito and Cricket boats of Atlantic City. No stay or shrouds are used with such a rig and the butt of the mast is soaped or greased so it will turn and allow the sail to pull the slide to leeward. The forward end of the sprit is supported by an outhaul which leads to a cleat at the after end of the centerboard trunk, permitting adjustment of the draft of the sail at any time.

2 page(s)

$3.50
Tramp--A 15-Ft. Knockabout in Plywood (Pub. No. 7819)

Any sailboat fancier will like “Tramp,” the trim, 15-ft. knockabout that’s so easy to build in plywood.

2 page(s)

$3.50
Skippy--A 11-ft 8 inch Plywood Sailboat (Pub. No. 7840)

by George Muir

A plywood sailboat 11 feet 8 inches long

2 page(s)

$3.50
Vee Bottom Center Board Cat (Pub. No. 7845)

Designed by Edson B. Schock

LOA 11 ft. 111/4 in., BEAM 4 ft. 11 in., DRAFT OF HULL 45/8 in., SAIL AREA 95 sq. Ft.

Here is a little boat that will really sail, is easy to build and is a good looking little craft. She is the perfect one-design racing boat for a crew of one but could be sailed with two. Her rig is simplicity itself and is very efficient and she is quite lively under canvas. The moderate deadrise, or vee of the bottom and the forward rake of the stem make for easy planking. A stem that rakes forward calls for less twist in the forward planks as they are naturally bowed out to meet the stem line when they reach the forward sections.

2 page(s)

$3.50
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