Small Craft Plans

Sort By:  
Mohawk (Pub. No. 7004)

by Charles Bell

16’ long, weighs 65 lbs. and has 240 lbs. of built-in flotation
.

Mohawk is designed especially for light weight and as such must be handled with judgment. You can’t toss a 75-lb. pack into the bottom from the dock, nor can you jump aboard with abandon yourself. She is plenty tough, however, properly handled and will be a joy to carry on those portages. For ordinary use, where no portages are involved, a light slat bottom can be used in the bottom. This consists of about 6 long spruce slats, ¼” x 1½” x full length, held together by a few crossties. This will help protect the bottom and will add another 10 lbs. of weight.

4 page(s)

$3.50
Kodiak Kayak (Pub. No. 7007)

by Hi Sibley

LOA 15' 8", BEAM 24"

You don’t have to be an Eskimo to build and enjoy this buoyant little craft. And it’s bound to please a water-minded youngster.

If you don’t happen to have any walrus ribs or deer hide handy, you can make a very good facsimile of an Alaskan kayak with plywood, pine and canvas. Here is a model that’s seaworthy as well as light. The cockpit is just aft of amidships to give more buoyancy forward to ride the surf better

4 page(s)

$3.50
Power Punt (Pub. No. 7008)

by Hi Sibley

LOA 10',BEAM 3'

Simplicity of design makes this craft the delight of the novice builder. It’s 16 feet of pure joy for the kiddies

Here is 16 feet of fun for all, and the simple design avoids those problems that beset the builder of a conventional boat. It can be powered by a lawn mower or scooter engine, or any of the small air-cooled jobs from ¾ hp to 2 hp, or more. Obviously it’s no speedboat, but glides over the water at from 4 mph to 10 mph, depending on the size of the motor. And it will carry about as many as you can pile on--kids that is!

3 page(s)

$3.50
All Purpose Knockabout (Pub. No. 7031)

by Hi Sibley

No-nonsense, workaday skiff will support three children, one adult. Takes only 11 hours to build.

This boat has half again the load capacity of a conventional 12’ skiff and is designed for the simplest construction with ordinary hand tools. All materials are available at any lumberyard; the mastic tape and marine glue at a boatyard. General over-all dimenslpns are given in Fig. 1.

2 page(s)

$3.50
It's Really Easy to Square-Stern Your Canoe (Pub. No. 7038)

by John Gartner

Square off the stern of your Canadian-type canoe to better accept an outboard motor.

Many boating enthusiasts like the traditional Indian watercraft, its silentness, its romance. But when the distance to be covered is great, they long for the back-saving advantages of a motor. Here is a way to fix a canoe so that it loses little of its accepted advantages and gains measurably in efficiency with a motor. Small outboards can be hung over the side of a canoe but at considerable loss of efficiency. If the craft’s stern is squared off, so that the power is applied directly at the rear, it becomes faster and far more maneuverable than with the power applied on the side.

2 page(s)

$3.50
Two Boats for the Unskilled Amateur (Pub. No. 7057)

by J. A. Baresch

Although we have presented several elaborate designs, there is a constant demand for very simple boats that almost anyone can build with the minimum amount of tools available and little skill. Both boats here shown are of plywood construction. One is a ten foot fishing punt suitable for fishermen and hunters, a type widely used especially in shallow waters. The drawing is self explanatory. The expanded (true length), sides shown will cut construction time considerably. The twelve foot rowboat, drawings of which are shown here also, will require a little more skill, but can be mastered by a beginner with a bit of study. As rowboats are greatly in demand, this little fellow should fill the bill. The builder must bear in mind that only waterproof marine -plywood so certified by the manufacturer is to be used.

2 page(s)

$3.50
Eskimo--A 16-Foot All-Plywood Kayak (Pub. No. 7059)

Designed by Charles 0. MacGregor

LOA 15 ft., 10 1/2 in., BEAM 1 ft., 11 in., DEPTH 8 in.

The Kayak is a native of the Arctic, and that one most familiar to us is the small hunting type used by the Greenland Eskimos.
This little craft, as used by the Greenlanders, is about 16 feet long, 16 inches wide and very shallow, little more than 7 inches where the paddler sits. They are very light in weight, but these little fellows perform many daring stunts with them, the most amusing and spectacular being that of turning completely over, under, and up again-smiling. Most of our domestic kayaks are built of canvas stretched over a light frame. This is quite satisfactory and inexpensive, but if one should have a spill and the kayak fills with water, it is generally so wracked and twisted as to be almost beyond repair, particularly if it has been tossed around much. In response to numerous requests we have developed an all-plywood kayak which will be stronger than a canvas hull, will be unsinkable and stand more punishment. It is a little heavier; but this is only a slight disadvantage: The plywood used should be one of the resin-bonded variety for marine use. One manufacturer can supply this in 16 foot panels without a splice.    Generally this costs a few cents more per square foot compared to the standard panel.

3 page(s)

$3.50
Whale-Tail Hunting Boat (Pub. No. 7064)

by Hi Sibley

LOA 96",BEAM 34", DRAFT ABOUT 6"

A novel method of propulsion enables this craft to glide silently through shallow as well as deep water with little effort. It is called Whale Tail because the fin operates in a horizontal plane. just as Moby Dick’s did. Cnstruction of the punt, or pram if you will, is more or less conventionaL All details of the propelling mechanism are illustrated: the fin, use stainless steel or other sheet metal thin enough to give a little but not so thin as to stay bent. Shaft A serves as steering post and shaft B as an operating link. Yokes on the ends can be picked up in an auto-parts yard. Note how the tubing for the pivoting bolts is welded or brazed to the fin. To dismantle the unit for transportation, unscrew pipe cap on bottom of Shaft A and loosen wing nuts on slotted pillow block. The punt then can be transported on the car’s top. All moving parts should be carefully fitted to prevent rattling.

2 page(s)

$3.50
How to Build a Quahogger: A Narragansett Bay Type (Pub. No. 7066)

by Michael P. Smith

An extremely useful and practical shoal draft working utility.

Recently we hired a contractor to repair the concrete piers on one of our bridges here in Narragansett Bay. Among the items of equipment he used were three outboard skiffs each powered with a 40 hp engine. Boxy in appearance, high-sided, with little or no flare, a straight vertical stem, vertical transom, flat bottom with little or no longitudinal rocker, as wide at the transom as they were amidships, they did not leave an impression of a goodlooking boat. Details at the gunwales were different but other than this they were nearly alike. (See drawings.) “Quahoggers” is what the contractor called them. My respect for these boats began almost immediately. We used them to haul material and ferry men back and forth between the beach and job site. They proved to be extremely fast and were excellent weight carriers. On calm days they could get up on a plane even when loaded. On rough days we carried seven men each trip with safety. I became interested in these boats and searched for plans with the idea of building one, but apparently plans for a “Quahogger” have never been published. I then started on a private research venture to learn more about these boats and to draw up a set of plans. I visited the waterfronts in Bristol, Warren, East Greenwich, Tiverton, and Newport. In each of these places I found “Quahoggers” being used as work boats, fishing boats, tongers, lobster boats and as small family yachts. I talked to owners and knowledgeable persons about them. No one knew anything about plans. One inquiry earned the reply that “Joe S. in Bristol will build you one, $250 unpainted.” A visit to Joe’s back yard showed that he had no plans but that he did have a building jig, and that he would build me a boat. Where did he get the jig? “Oh, my father made it years ago.” The “Quahogger” is the beginning of a type. Except for the ordinary flat-bottomed skiff, it has no forebearers and did not evolve from any earlier models. It is, I believe, the forerunner of another local type which is a very good looking skiff and that is the “Dutch Harbor Skiff.” From what I can gather, Quahoggers were first built in the Narragansett Bay area after the advent of the outboard engine, the weight of the engine aft dictating the
need for the very wide transom. these boats were first built by men in the shellfish trade. The boat satisfied their requirements for a simple, practical, seaworthy, heavy load carrying and economical skiff. Basically, present-day Quahoggers are the same as those first built. The Quahog skiff is a local type that doesn’t get much publicity. They are so common here on the Bay that a potential buyer would look and then pass them off as being too ordinary and too simple. Surprising as it may seem, however, they are fast, stable, economical and practical. One man who knows says, “they are the best platform available for pulling’ pots and tongin’, and they are fast; they’ve won every work boat race ever held in Newport.” Another expert says, “ . . . one of the nicest boats in the Bay for the purpose for which they are built.” They are that they can be driven right up on the beach for loading and unloading. Our workmen boarded and left over the bow onto a sandy beach without getting their feet wet, and the boats have enough power to back clear of the beach with a full load. Most of the work boats have only two seats, one in the bow and one in the stern. The rest of the boat is wide open for plenty of working space and accommodation for such gear as pots, pot haulers, rakes, tongs and baskets. The interior of all boats varied with their use, all being quite functional. Building a “Quahogger” is quite simple—you just set up the forms and wrap the planks around them.

4 page(s)

$3.50
12 foot Rowboat, A (Pub. No. 7800)

The hull is built bottom side up on a "building board", the top edge of which is shaped to conform to the keelson curveture dimensioned in the sheet plan.

2 page(s)

$3.50
Susan (Pub. No. 7802)

by Robert M. Steward

This easily propelled 11-ft. flat-bottom rowboat requires little boat building know-how to construct.

2 page(s)

$3.50
Pootzy (Pub. No. 7803)

by Al Mason

This 6-ft. 6-in. dinghy fills the need for a small, substantial, easily stored and handled boat.

This dinghy is only six feet six inches long by thirty-eight inches wide and will be built quite light for ease of handling when stowing on deck. Complete with all equipment except oars, Pootzy should not weigh much more than fifty-five pounds, which is about double that of a one-man rubber life raft which carries two people. This little dinghy can carry two and it is to be noted that the oarsman seat is in the shape of a tee, so that with two locations for oarlocks his position can be varied to suit, depending on one or two in the dinghy.

4 page(s)

$3.50
Combination Rowing, Sailing and Outboard Boat (Pub. No. 7804)

Designed by F.W. Goeller

Here is a handsome, heavy duty service boat that, properly built, will give years of service, and is well adapted to rowing, sailing or outboard use. She will take the largest outboards one would care to handle over her stern and she is designed not to squat at the stern. She will carry a big load and is not light. She is a heavy boat, built with all the trimmings that used to be seen in the old-time heavy yacht gigs.

3 page(s)

$3.50
Whaleboat (Lines Only) (Pub. No. 7805)

Lines taken off by William H. Hand, Jr.

The New Bedford Whaleboat, in her time launched on all the oceans of the world, probably shows the maximum development reached in building small boats that were to be propelled by oars or sails. The men who manned them were interested in two things besides the first condition of seaworthiness: speed and silence. Lightness of construction was a prime factor in these craft. They were maneuvered entirely by manpower, lowered in the falls and hoisted again without the aid of such modern gear as power winches and the quick response needed during an attack could not be had in a heavy boat. The 28-footer shown in the accompanying lines weighed not much over 1,000 pounds.

1 page(s)

$3.50
Glouchester Fisherman's Dory (Pub. No. 7806)

The most universally used small boat for ocean work is without doubt the fisherman’s dory. At the same time, probably not one of these boats is built from plans, in the ordinary sense. They are built by men who were brought up in the business, who learned from experience—and the men who taught them as beginners—how to do the job. The true dory, as developed by the fishermen of the New England Coast, is ideally suited for her work, but she was developed in the boat yard by trial and error, not on the drafting board of a naval architect. Consequently it is not possible to give a complete set of lines for construction purposes—they don’t exist. The lines shown herewith were taken off a dory on a fishing schooner lying in South Brooklyn, where many of the New England boats put in. The scantling dimensions were taken from a dory at Fulton Market, New York.

2 page(s)

$3.50
N.J. Seabright Skiff (Lines Only) (Pub. No. 7807)

Lines of Clinker-built Craft 18 ft. to 30 ft. overall

For landings on the open seacoast, such as the beaches of New Jersey or the southern shore of Long Island, the type known as the Seabright or New Jersey skiff was developed several years ago. The design was taken over by fishermen, and as is the case with many boats built for local use and with suitability for hard service as the main consideration, no real design was ever made. The lines shown here are not construction plans and cannot be used as such unless more work is put on them. They do, however, show the general contours of an especially seaworthy type that proved its usefulness under the hard conditions for which the boats were built. The lines were taken off an actual Seabright skiff by the late naval architect, Roger M. Haddock.

1 page(s)

$3.50
Half-Pint--A small simplified sea sled (Pub. No. 7808)

A little plywood and a lawn-mower engine are all you need to build "Half Pint".

Plywood-preferably the waterproof kind, a small amount of miscellaneous stock and a tiny gasoline motor is all you need to make "Half Pint.” The original, capable of carrying three persons, was quite a sensation at Balboa bay, Calif., where even the old boat builders expressed genuine interest. Built in a garage, it was taken 50 miles for its first dip and has never developed a leak. This little sea sled can be easily carried on your car, and fishermen and tourists will find it ideal for use on remote lakes having no boating facilities. It is only 9 ft. long and so light that two boys can easily carry it. This boat is suitable for the use of any small gasoline engine of the lawon-mower type, air-cooled by a fan in the flywheel. The 1/2-hp. engine which was selected, is exceptionally satisfactory because the gas tank is in the base and as it is a self-contained unit throughout.

3 page(s)

$3.50
Fun at the Beach with a Bicycle Boat (Pub. No. 7809)

Buoyancy and speed are two features of this bicycle boat which was built for vacationists at a lake near Chicago and used a whole season. It consists of two pontoons and an old bicycle frame, held centrally above and between the former. Propulsion is obtained by the use of a ring-and-pinion gear, bolted to the pedal sprocket, and a small three—blade propeller connected to the gears by a suitable shafting.

4 page(s)

$3.50
Feathercraft--A paddling Pontoon (Pub. No. 7810)

Propelled half by swimming and half by paddling, these featherweight pontoons will provide plenty of sport at any beach.

1 page(s)

$3.50
Land Boat, The (Pub. No. 7811)

At the time of the great French war a British frigate that was on blockade duty off the coast near Quieberon, stood too far in to reconnoitre, and being caught by a calm and heavy swell went on a reef and was totally wrecked. The officers and crew escaped to the shore and were made prisoners by the enemy’s coast guard. The French custom was to send all seamen taken as far inland as possible so they might not be retaken or escape to their fleets, and the officers and crew of this frigate were shipped far into the interior of the country. Away from the sea, a captive in an inland town the captain of the frigate cast about for some form of amusement, and struck upon the happy idea of building a landboat, upon which to sail the French highways. The boat was built, and though a heavy and clumsy contrivarice proved a success. Since then in many countries land yachts have been built, but they have been all makeshift craft, of misfit materials and cannot have been either very fast or good handlers. There was one built to sail on a railroad track, which, if the owner didn’t lie, made forty miles an hour. The one whose plan is here given was designed by Mr. Ashley and as will be readily seen is an adaptation of his iceboat to land locomotion.

2 page(s)

$3.50
Per Page      1 - 20 of 47
More books