Skiffs  

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A plywood skiff ideal for all types of rugged row-boating.
$3.50
by William F. Crosby
A fine little plywood skiff having many uses, is easy enough for even the novice to construct.
$3.50
by Weston Farmer
Here's a flat-bottom grain-belt yacht--for those lazy fishing days out for sunfish or yellow perch.
$3.50
by Charles G. MacGregor
A handy little packet suitable for a small outboard or air-cooled inboard engine.
$3.50
by Charles G. MacGregor
The American skiff is probably the most popular type of small boat in this country today.
$3.50
Handy--An 11 Ft 6 Inch Skiff in Plywood (Pub. No. 7817)
/A plywood skiff ideal for all types of rugged row-boating.

Handy, the 11-ft. 6-in. plywood skiff, is ideal for all types of rugged row-boating. Construction plans for the skiff are complete and a material list is provided.

4 page(s)

$3.50
Tadpole (Pub. No. 7801)
William F. Crosby/A fine little plywood skiff having many uses, is easy enough for even the novice to construct.

by William F. Crosby

A fine little plywood skiff having many uses, is easy enough for even the novice to construct.

2 page(s)

$3.50
Shorebird (Pub. No. 7005)
Weston Farmer/Here's a flat-bottom grain-belt yacht--for those lazy fishing days out for sunfish or yellow perch.

by Weston Farmer

LOA 14' 3", BEAM 5'

Here’s a flat bottom grain-belt yacht—for those lazy fishing days out for sunfish or yellow perch. As easy building as baiting a hook, she features a built-in live well

Out on the sunfish and crappie waters of the Iowa and Minnesota sand lake country, you’ll see hundreds of board-and-slat skiffs pulled up on shore. There’s nothing fancy about these grain-belt yachts. Their claim to fame is their simplicity and economy. They may not be worthy of floor space at a boat show, and you never see one of their kind there, but for quick building, satisfaction in service and long life, they are just the ticket. Anybody who wants to go fishing badly enough can build one. For sitting in the sun over a crappie hole, you can’t beat ‘em. Shorebird here is typical of the type. You cut out a stem, bolt a couple of plain planks to the stem through temporary cleats, spread the planks with a midship mould, and then horse the planks home to the transom with a Spanish windlass. What you’ll have is not a thing of beauty, nor the most perfect of fiat-bottomed models. Nevertheless, it is a boat that you can row fairly well, which will also take a 2 or 3 hp light outboard. Her bottom rockers according to the sweep of her bent topside planking and her dimensions are dictated by lumber available in standard sizes in any local yard. She is heavy enough to weather any average chop. Just remember that as long as the forefoot of a flat-bottomed boat is loaded a little below the waterline, they act like boats. Get them cocked too high and they slam—all of them

4 page(s)

$3.50
Factotum--A Power Skiff (Pub. No. 7060)
Charles G. MacGregor/A handy little packet suitable for a small outboard or air-cooled inboard engine.

Designed by Charles G. MacGregor

LOA 15 ft. 6 in., BEAM 5 ft., draft 2 ft.

These plans show a 15'6" utility power boat, one of these handy little packets in which a small outboard or air-cooled inboard engine may be installed. This is not a speed boat in any sense of the word, therefore do not expect speeds in excess of 7 miles an hour, and do not use any power plant over 6 hp. It was designed as a utility tender for a large schooner yacht, and as such, is expected to perform a multiplicity of duties.    It is light enough to lift aboard and stow on deck, has good carrying capacity and therefore would be extremely useful around a summer camp.

2 page(s)

$3.50
Beaver--An All-Purpose Skiff (Pub. No. 7062)
Charles G. MacGregor/The American skiff is probably the most popular type of small boat in this country today.

11'8" All Purpose Sldff By Charles G: MacGregor

LOA 11' 8 in., BEAM 4 ft. 4 in., DRAFT (LEEBOARD DOWN) 1 ft. 6 in.

The American skiff is probably the most popular type of boat in this country today.    Many thousands are in use and they are to be found in almost every corner of the United States and Canada: These vary in construction and form from the simplest with flat bottom and straight vertical sides to the vee-bottom and flared sides or the beautifully built planked up models, now unfortunately seldom seen or built. They are our most numerous utility boat though most of them lack the all-around qualifications because of their absolute simplicity of form and build. A utility or all-purpose boat must serve in a wide variety of duties and perform them with the least amount of effort or power whether that power is delivered by oars, sail or motor. These qualifications are listed below: a; stron, b; light weight, c; low cost, d; low upkeep, e; simple and easy to build; f; easy to row with one or more aboard, g; sail well to windwrd in choppy water; h; have profvision for small outboard engine; j. suitable for small inboard engine.
In addition to all these qualifications it may easily be transported an a trailer, on top of a car or on the deck of a larger boat; be readily towed astern of an auxiliary or power cruiser without too much drag, and many other duties too numerous to mention here.

3 page(s)

$3.50
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