Fun Boats  

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Half-Pint--A small simplified sea sled (Pub. No. 7808)

A little plywood and a lawn-mower engine are all you need to build "Half Pint".

Plywood-preferably the waterproof kind, a small amount of miscellaneous stock and a tiny gasoline motor is all you need to make "Half Pint.” The original, capable of carrying three persons, was quite a sensation at Balboa bay, Calif., where even the old boat builders expressed genuine interest. Built in a garage, it was taken 50 miles for its first dip and has never developed a leak. This little sea sled can be easily carried on your car, and fishermen and tourists will find it ideal for use on remote lakes having no boating facilities. It is only 9 ft. long and so light that two boys can easily carry it. This boat is suitable for the use of any small gasoline engine of the lawon-mower type, air-cooled by a fan in the flywheel. The 1/2-hp. engine which was selected, is exceptionally satisfactory because the gas tank is in the base and as it is a self-contained unit throughout.

3 page(s)

$3.50
Fun at the Beach with a Bicycle Boat (Pub. No. 7809)

Buoyancy and speed are two features of this bicycle boat which was built for vacationists at a lake near Chicago and used a whole season. It consists of two pontoons and an old bicycle frame, held centrally above and between the former. Propulsion is obtained by the use of a ring-and-pinion gear, bolted to the pedal sprocket, and a small three—blade propeller connected to the gears by a suitable shafting.

4 page(s)

$3.50
Feathercraft--A paddling Pontoon (Pub. No. 7810)

Propelled half by swimming and half by paddling, these featherweight pontoons will provide plenty of sport at any beach.

1 page(s)

$3.50
Land Boat, The (Pub. No. 7811)

At the time of the great French war a British frigate that was on blockade duty off the coast near Quieberon, stood too far in to reconnoitre, and being caught by a calm and heavy swell went on a reef and was totally wrecked. The officers and crew escaped to the shore and were made prisoners by the enemy’s coast guard. The French custom was to send all seamen taken as far inland as possible so they might not be retaken or escape to their fleets, and the officers and crew of this frigate were shipped far into the interior of the country. Away from the sea, a captive in an inland town the captain of the frigate cast about for some form of amusement, and struck upon the happy idea of building a landboat, upon which to sail the French highways. The boat was built, and though a heavy and clumsy contrivarice proved a success. Since then in many countries land yachts have been built, but they have been all makeshift craft, of misfit materials and cannot have been either very fast or good handlers. There was one built to sail on a railroad track, which, if the owner didn’t lie, made forty miles an hour. The one whose plan is here given was designed by Mr. Ashley and as will be readily seen is an adaptation of his iceboat to land locomotion.

2 page(s)

$3.50
Foam Boots (Pub. No. 7832)

by Charles Bell

Build these seagoing boots and have fun learning to walk on water.

Swimmers, using these gadgets, can play many games on the water and they are handy for walking around your boat, tending lines and walking ashore, too; of course you have to learn to walk on ‘em. They are easy to build and cost very little. It will take some practice to learn to walk on these foam boots. Start out wearing a bathing suit because you’ll have many falls, but the trick can be mastered!

4 page(s)

$3.50
Aquacycle (Pub. No. 7833)

by Charles Bell

Convert that old bicycle into an amphibious craft for fun on both land and water.

This vehicle can be ridden on the beach and can be run right out on the water and back again. The two pontoons, immersed four inches, will support 480 pounds, so that two boys can have fun at the same time. This is primarily a vehicle for swimmers, but you can ride it wearing clothes although fenders are necessary for this and shorts are recommended because your feet will go into the water when pedaling. Aquacycle is simple to build and requires a minimum of tools; a few wrenches, a screw driver, a hammer, a hack saw and a paint brush will suffice.

4 page(s)

$3.50
Build this Underwater Aquaplane (Pub. No. 7886)

by Walter Morris

Taking a ride on this sleek little underwater sled is a lot like water skiing, but with more thrills. The photos below, taken at Silver Springs, Florida, show how it operatres. By moving the control surfaces you can throw it into a sharp bank, do a slow roll or even flip over and run upside down. As for diving gear, you can get by with simply a mask, snorkel and fins. Construction is simplicity itself. The use of wingnuts with carriage bolts makes it possible to take the quaplane apart for easy carrying.

2 page(s)

$3.50
Build this Pontoon Boat (Pub. No. 7894)

by Harry Wicks

For all-out water fun, safety and economical operation, a pontoon boat is a hard craft to beat. The version shown in this plan sheet is intended for protected waters, and although substantially built, the lightweight materials it is constructedof provide great load-carrying ability without excessive weight.

3 page(s)

$3.50
Build this Floating Lawn Chair (Pub. No. 7899)

Mount a patio chair between pontoons and you have the perfect rig for escaping from the heat. For even more fun, hang a fishing motor on it.

If you're looking for hustle or hurry, forget it. This low-power lounge is strictly for loafing. Basically, it’s just a folding aluminum chaise bolted between two pontoons. A stubby 2x8 transom board behind the chair back will take any of the smaller fishing motors, giving you power to putt-putt around the shallows. A steel bracket installed on the motor in place of the steering handle provides for both steering and throttle control through levers mounted on either side of the chair. However, the motor is really just an optional bit of luxury. You’ll have almost as much fun simply floating around near the dock or paddling lazily along the nearby shore. The powered version can be built in a couple of weekends. Forget about power and you’ll not only cut the cost but be able to do the whole job in a day or so. The pontoons are made of Styrofoam sandwiched between 1/2-in, marine plywood. To dress up the appearance, the exposed foam edges are covered with vinyl decking secured with epoxy.

3 page(s)

$3.50
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