Hunting and Camping Boats  

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Whale-Tail Hunting Boat (Pub. No. 7064)

by Hi Sibley

LOA 96",BEAM 34", DRAFT ABOUT 6"

A novel method of propulsion enables this craft to glide silently through shallow as well as deep water with little effort. It is called Whale Tail because the fin operates in a horizontal plane. just as Moby Dick’s did. Cnstruction of the punt, or pram if you will, is more or less conventionaL All details of the propelling mechanism are illustrated: the fin, use stainless steel or other sheet metal thin enough to give a little but not so thin as to stay bent. Shaft A serves as steering post and shaft B as an operating link. Yokes on the ends can be picked up in an auto-parts yard. Note how the tubing for the pivoting bolts is welded or brazed to the fin. To dismantle the unit for transportation, unscrew pipe cap on bottom of Shaft A and loosen wing nuts on slotted pillow block. The punt then can be transported on the car’s top. All moving parts should be carefully fitted to prevent rattling.

2 page(s)

$3.50
Wimpy--A paddle Wheel Duck Boat (Pub. No. 7813)

Shoal draft and silent.

This light and stable duck boat is designed for the greatest convenience to the hunter, who propells the craft with the hands and steers with his feet while his gun is instantly at hand in a rack on the gunwhale. As the propelling mechanism is all inboard, it is possible to make a blind of shrubbery around the gunwhale, an achievement not possible with a rowboat or canoe which depend upon oars for movement. With all the bearings carefully fitted to eliminate any play, and the paddle wheel completely housed, the boat will move as silently as a light canoe. Constructed of this material, staunchly braced, it is conveniently hauled on a trailer and very easily launched.

3 page(s)

$3.50
No Trailer Needed for This Light Garvey (Pub. No. 7848)

by Hi Sibley

Built in halves, this Barnegat Bay sneaker-type craft is easily hoisted up on the car-top rack, and by virtue of its rectangular design will accommodate more load than the conventional skiff. Construction is much easier too. General over-all dimensions are given, with nose construction and a sectional view showing the beveled rails on the forward half that fit over the stern half and prevent it from slipping sideways.

2 page(s)

$3.50
How to Build a Duckboat (Pub. No. 7849)

by Edson I. Schock

Sharp all over, including both ends, is this he-man’s rugged duckboat. She is designed for building by the man who is interested more in hunting than in boatbuilding and hence is simplicity itself, using standard woods

Assuming that the owner of this craft will be more interested in duck shooting than in boatbuilding, she has been designed to be as simple as possible to build, yet to produce a boat that will have good stability and will row reasonably well.

4 page(s)

$3.50
Guenther Garvey, The (Pub. No. 7878)

by J.R. Nowling

Old-timers along New Jersey's south shore are likely to tell you the little outboard garveys that prowl their shallow waters in all seasons of the year were named for a Frenchman called Gervais--but the younger genereration insists that Bob Guenther, a young masonry contractor at Beach Haven, rates most of the credit for the garveys popularity. Actually, the garveyis styled somewhat along the lines of the Barnegat sneakbox, favored by clammers and duck hunters for generations. Probably the most significant difference is underwater: the sneakbox has a rounded bottom, the garvey is flat side to side while curving very gently front to back.

2 page(s)

$3.50
Duck Boat You can Build, A (Pub. No. 7881)

by Jack Seville

In the dark, you paddle quietly. A hint of the sun’s rising shows on the horizon and water laps the side of your boat. Before you sits your Labrador, his ears alert. Between you and him lies a pile of decoys. You are on your way to one of life’s real pleasures . . . a morning of duck shooting. You set out the decoys and hide the boat amongst some reeds, camouflaging it. Then you arrange your shooting gear and hunker down below the gunwale with the Lab to wait for the arrival of the ducks. Every part of this experience is exhilarating. But perhaps most filled with anticipation of all the day’s events is the trip out in the duck boat. The truth is, however, that few duck hunters have a duck boat. Most think one too expensive to own or too heavy to carry or too complicated to build or . . . too something. Too many duck hunters settle for the best they can do from the near shore and never try to get out where the water is and the hunting’s at its best. Which is where this boat comes in. It's a design that solves the problems a duck hunter sometimes has with his duck boat. Copied from craft used by veteran hunters on Virginia’s Eastern Shore, the boat has several things that recommend it. First, AquaDuck it can be built inexpensively. Secondly, the boat isn’t awkward. Designed to hold one man plus one dog plus gear, she can be moved about by one man and carried on the top of a car. And thirdly, the boat makes an easy project to put together. Essentially an oblong box with a rocker bottom, construction materials are mostly two sheets of 1/4-in. plywood and a quantity of 1-in, lumber. The hull is compartmentalized into three watertight chambers, and there’s not a difficult curve in the craft. As a boat, she demonstrates a nice design. She can be rowed or poled with an oar, or powered by a 2- or 3-hp outboard, or towed to her station by another boat. The wide stance and flat bottom give her good stability—you can stand up on one of the side decks or the forward deck and not tip over. Yet she ranks high in maneuverability. And as a duck blind, the boat offers some thoughtful features. One of these is the grass rail that surrounds the cockpit and provides a place to stuff grass and reeds to make good camouflage. Ahd another is the cockpit itself, which is shallow but with a coaming all around. In use, you lie in the cockpit with feet at the transom and gun pointed aft. The coaming slants down toward the stern to give an unobstructed view.

2 page(s)

$3.50
Build the Quacker (Pub. No. 7895)

by Hal Kelly

A Nimble Lightweight Skimmer for Duck Hunters

Duck hunters have long sought a duckboat of a particular kind—one that can be used in shallow, shallow water. The problem is severe in tidal flats. Man and partner (400 lbs.), man’s best friend (80 lbs.) and gear (25 lbs.) go out to a blind at high tide when there’s 4 ft. of water. Then they want to come home, but the tide’s low and there’s only 4 in. of water. Solution: The Quacker, the shallowest-draft duckboat ever. And it’s pushed by an air motor. With a 67-in, beam, 12-ft. 4-in. length, 16-in, transom height and 3-in. draft, the craft won’t easily tip. It has a storage box (lined if you want) for guns and ammunition, and another for decoys and downed birds. The electric start, 12-hp. Susquehanna air motor pushes the craft to 12 mph, and if you fasten 1-in, angle irons to the outer bottom battens, The Quacker becomes a great ice or snow boat. On ice it should hit 30 mph, so attach a levertype ice brake so you can stop it.

2 page(s)

$3.50
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