Canoes and Kayaks

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Mohawk (Pub. No. 7004)

by Charles Bell

16’ long, weighs 65 lbs. and has 240 lbs. of built-in flotation
.

Mohawk is designed especially for light weight and as such must be handled with judgment. You can’t toss a 75-lb. pack into the bottom from the dock, nor can you jump aboard with abandon yourself. She is plenty tough, however, properly handled and will be a joy to carry on those portages. For ordinary use, where no portages are involved, a light slat bottom can be used in the bottom. This consists of about 6 long spruce slats, ¼” x 1½” x full length, held together by a few crossties. This will help protect the bottom and will add another 10 lbs. of weight.

4 page(s)

$3.50
Kodiak Kayak (Pub. No. 7007)

by Hi Sibley

LOA 15' 8", BEAM 24"

You don’t have to be an Eskimo to build and enjoy this buoyant little craft. And it’s bound to please a water-minded youngster.

If you don’t happen to have any walrus ribs or deer hide handy, you can make a very good facsimile of an Alaskan kayak with plywood, pine and canvas. Here is a model that’s seaworthy as well as light. The cockpit is just aft of amidships to give more buoyancy forward to ride the surf better

4 page(s)

$3.50
It's Really Easy to Square-Stern Your Canoe (Pub. No. 7038)

by John Gartner

Square off the stern of your Canadian-type canoe to better accept an outboard motor.

Many boating enthusiasts like the traditional Indian watercraft, its silentness, its romance. But when the distance to be covered is great, they long for the back-saving advantages of a motor. Here is a way to fix a canoe so that it loses little of its accepted advantages and gains measurably in efficiency with a motor. Small outboards can be hung over the side of a canoe but at considerable loss of efficiency. If the craft’s stern is squared off, so that the power is applied directly at the rear, it becomes faster and far more maneuverable than with the power applied on the side.

2 page(s)

$3.50
Eskimo--A 16-Foot All-Plywood Kayak (Pub. No. 7059)

Designed by Charles 0. MacGregor

LOA 15 ft., 10 1/2 in., BEAM 1 ft., 11 in., DEPTH 8 in.

The Kayak is a native of the Arctic, and that one most familiar to us is the small hunting type used by the Greenland Eskimos.
This little craft, as used by the Greenlanders, is about 16 feet long, 16 inches wide and very shallow, little more than 7 inches where the paddler sits. They are very light in weight, but these little fellows perform many daring stunts with them, the most amusing and spectacular being that of turning completely over, under, and up again-smiling. Most of our domestic kayaks are built of canvas stretched over a light frame. This is quite satisfactory and inexpensive, but if one should have a spill and the kayak fills with water, it is generally so wracked and twisted as to be almost beyond repair, particularly if it has been tossed around much. In response to numerous requests we have developed an all-plywood kayak which will be stronger than a canvas hull, will be unsinkable and stand more punishment. It is a little heavier; but this is only a slight disadvantage: The plywood used should be one of the resin-bonded variety for marine use. One manufacturer can supply this in 16 foot panels without a splice.    Generally this costs a few cents more per square foot compared to the standard panel.

3 page(s)

$3.50
Skimmer--A Sturdy Plywood Kayak (Pub. No. 7822)

This kayak is staunch and seaworthy because it’s built of waterproof plywood over a conventional frame. Sides are vertical and only 6 in. high from the bottom edge of the chine to the top edge of the sheer batten, but this gives enough freeboard to keep off moderately rough water.

2 page(s)

$3.50
King Canvasback--A 15 ft. Plywood Kayak (Pub. No. 7861)

by John M. Miller Jr.

Here’s a classic kayak easily built in plywood and~canvas.

Fifteen ft. long and 31 in. in beam, King Canvasback is an ideal fatherand-son project. The craft is easily handled by one man and two boats can be car-topped on a small foreign car. It takes only a few weekends of work from layouT to launching. The project is simple enough for hand tools. but a variable-speed jig saw, drill and orbital sander make the job go faster.

4 page(s)

$3.50
Nor'Wester--A 15.5-Ft. Alaskan Type Kayak (Pub. No. 7882)

by Hi Sibley
Anyone handy with ordinary carpenter tools should be able to buld this light and sturdy Alaskan Eskimo-type kayak. The ornamental piece at the stem represents the head of a seal and serves a practical purpose as a handle for carrying to and from the beach, and the stern assembly also has a handle.

4 page(s)

$3.50
Convert Your Canoe to Sail (Pub. No. 7888)

by Clint McGirr

Few craft are simpler to rig or more adaptable to sailing than a canoe. They are also excellent for learning to sail. And fortunately, a canoe sailing rig is cheaply made. The, rig is easily assembled to the canoe and easily disassembled for storage or paddling. The only part permanently attached to the canoe is the mast step, a block of wood with a hole drilled in it to hold the mast butt. It is epoxied to the bottom of the canoe and in no way interferes with normal paddling. If your canoe has a beam of at least 30 in., you can convert it for safe sailing. Just keep the sail small so it doesn’t overpower the canoe. Compute a safe sail size by multiplying the canoe’s length by its width. This will give the approximate sail area. The rig here was designed for a canoe 16 ft. long and 2½ ft. wide. It contains 40 sq. ft. of sailcloth and is equilateral, each side measuring 9½ ft. It is a lateen rig.

3 page(s)

$3.50
Build this Simplified Canvas Kayak (Pub. No. 7918)

by Hi Sibley

To attain maximum speed with minimum effort, most kayaks are built very long and extremely narrow, so that the lines actually resemble a toothpick. The narrow ones, however, are not easy for the amateur to handle. The one to be described is a much more stable type, having several inches more beam and not so much length. The weight and actual displacement compares favorably with the faster craft. Throughout, this kayak is also designed for simplicity of construction, being identical at both ends, and the roomy cockpit exactly in the middle. Thus frames can be made in pairs, and are spaced the same distances apart. Stem and stern are exactly alike; this enables the passenger to paddle in either direction. In narrow waters, or when one is in a hurry, it is not necessary to swing the craft around—not an easy task in limited space—instead, the passenger simply changes his position from one end of the cockpit to the other. This kayak incidentally, will carry two comfortably.

4 page(s)

$3.50
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