Boatcraft & Fitting-Out

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How to Make a Folding Galley Shelf (Pub. No. 7760)

In the galley of a small craft, any project that uses wasted space and promotes easier, simplified cooking procedures helps the cook stay in the good graces of the crew. A hinged shelf at an end of a galley counter can do multiple duty. It can serve as a spot to prepare food, a support for the galley stove, a place to drain and dry dishes, or as the bar when the sun is over the yardarm.

2 page(s)

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Varnishing and Enameling Below Decks (Pub. No. 7762)

As nice as it looks in the beginning, varnished mahogany or teak below decks can, over the years, give a claustrophobic feeling to your boat’s cabin. You can, however, obtain an elegant, airy interior by refinishing the bulkheads and door panels in an off-white yacht enamel while keeping all trim, door-jambs, molding, grab rails, and shelves brightwork. The expanse of bright, satin-smooth enamel paint surrounded by gleaming varnish work is a traditional and extremely handsome finish.

4 page(s)

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Refinishing a Wooden Spar (Pub. No. 7763)

Every season, wooden spars are normally given two coats of varnish. In time, however, the varnish coating breaks down due to chafe, hard knocks, and weathering, and water penetrates the coating. Yellowing, darkening, blisters, and black spots are signs that the time has come to “wood down” the spar-—strip it of all the coating down to bare wood. This is a very satisfying kind of project, not only because wood is so nice to work with, but also because a spar of Sitka spruce, for example, is a structure of great strength and beauty, and deserves as handsome a coating as possible. To refinish a wooden spar, follow these steps.

2 page(s)

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Refinishing Superstructure Brightwork (Pub. No. 7764)

Generally, brightwork means the bright look of finely grained wood that has received a number of coats of clear varnish or some other clear coating. While brightwork requires more work than some other types of coatings, many boat owners feel that the results obtained are well worthwhile.

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Painting the Cabin Overhead (Pub. No. 7765)

If the cabin overhead of a fiberglass boat has mildewed, or suffered from deck leaks, fumes from kerosene lamps or the galley stove, then a paint job can bring it back to “yacht” condition. High-gloss enamel is the easiest surface to keep clean and it will brighten up a dark cabin with its reflectivity. Assuming the cabin ceiling is a fiberglass gel coat (or liner) or sprayed polyester resin, and that any deck leaks have been repaired, follow these steps:.

2 page(s)

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Refinishing A Teak and Holly Cabin Sole (Pub. No. 7766)

No other surface on a boat takes as much abuse as a cabin sole. Tools and beverage cans are always dropping on it and breaking through the protective varnish. Then water seeps in, yellowing and blistering the surface. Fortunately, the sole is easy to bring back into good condition because it is a flat, horizontal surface that is convenient to work on. Today’s refinishing materials ensure that this project can be done quickly with excellent results. To refinish a teak and holly cabin sole, follow these steps.

2 page(s)

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Painting Metal Surfaces (Pub. No. 7767)

Unless the metal fixtures aboard your boat are chrome-plated or stainless steel, they are susceptible to corrosion. Bronze takes on an unsightly patina. In a saltwater environment, aluminum pits and white powdery corrosion forms around the fittings. Here is how to protect some common metal items on board.

3 page(s)

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Painting an Inboard Engine (Pub. No. 7768)

A spotless, glossy engine is the hallmark of responsible boat maintenance. If the inboard engine’s factory paint job has faded, or if rust is beginning to form, some touching up is in order. Before tackling the job of painting the engine, however, give some careful consideration to the task.

3 page(s)

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Bottom Painting (Pub. No. 7769)

Painting a boat’s bottom is one chore that cannot be avoided by the saltwater boater. A neglected hull bottom inevitably gets worse, making the boat slower in the water, and the cost of the inevitable maintenance job skyrockets. Before getting into painting a boat’s bottom, it is useful to know how bottom, or anti-fouling, paint works.

3 page(s)

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Boot-Tops and Boat Stripes (Pub. No. 7770)

A boottop is the traditional stripe at a craft’s waterline. It is used to indicate an area between the waterlines of a ship when it is fully loaded and unloaded. On pleasure craft, however, the boottop is mostly decorative and varies in its location. Some boats have a decorative stripe just below their rail. In fact, there is no law that says you cannot paint a stripe up the mast if you wish. A popular way to apply a stripe along a hull today is not to paint it at all, but to do it with tape made for that purpose. Paint manufacturers, however, still make boottop paint and many boat owners still prefer to paint their own stripes.

4 page(s)

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Rooftop Ventilator from a Plastic Bowl, A (Pub. No. 7771)

If your boat requires additional ventilation, here is a simple way to make a ventilator that mounts on a hatch or cabin top. It provides good ventilation in rainy weather, yet keeps out rain and spray. For this project, you will require a piece of 4 inch diameter plastic pipe, approximately 7 to 8 inches in length. You also will need a small can of solvent cement for the type of plastic pipe you obtain. In addition, the project calls for two fittings: a coupling section for the pipe that is about 4 inches long, and an end cap. The only other items needed besides a few small screws is a plastic or aluminum kitchen bowl with a flat lip around its edge. The bowl should be about 6 inches in height. To make and install a rainproof ventilator, follow these steps.

3 page(s)

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Wire Rope Splicing (Pub. No. 7787)

by Francis G. Wachs

Splicing wire rope is a subject that is not readily understood, and even after one has grasped the idea of how it is done there still is a certain amount of practice required, depending on the skill of the individual, to make a good splice. But in my opinion a clear understanding of how it should be done is more than half the battle.

3 page(s)

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Electric Remote Helmsman, An (Pub. No. 7790)

By Rolfe F. Schell

Remote-control steering lets you go up forward to pilot or scout for fish without giving up the helm.

What better use could there be for a salvaged convertible-top power unit than to provide an electrically-powered, remote steering control for your boat? Although hydraulic and electro-hydraulic units are available, the electric-powered units used on Chrysler products are the easiest to install. In addition to one of these, you’ll need a couple of heavy-duty relays of the same voltage as tice motor, a turnbuckle that extends from 12 to 18 in., an eye bolt, a few scraps of lumber, and a single-pole, double-throw switch.

2 page(s)

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How to Build a Diving Raft (Pub. No. 7812)

With the summer swimming season here again, people who have an opportunity to do so despite war conditions are again making plans for boating, diving and water life. Nothing adds more to water sports fun than a good raft, where “the gang” can get together and lie under “Old Sol” and absorb ultraviolet rays, or have a floating picnic, or spin yarns. To serve these merry ends, this inexpensive raft was constructed. Anyone who knows a hammer from a saw can build it. No fancy materials are needed. It can be built of scrap pieces of lumber easily obtained.

1 page(s)

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Keeping an Old Deck in Good Shape (Pub. No. 7814)

Nowhere about a boat does age or neglect show as quickly as in the condition of the deck and cabin top, while nothing spoils her appearance or detracts from a boat’s value more than a cracked canvas deck or a poorly cared for wooden one with leaking open seams. Keeping any deck in shape is a problem. A canvassed deck or cabin top kept painted with the same high gloss deck enamel which looked so well when you bought your boat will invariably develop minute cracks or checks within three years time. No amount of subsequent sanding and painting will entirely obliterate these; indeed as time goes on and the paint film becomes thicker the cracks will grow deeper, reaching down into the canvas itself and in many cases causing leaks that will make either patching or complete replacement necessary.

4 page(s)

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Install Power in your Canoe (Pub. No. 7815)

Once you’ve experienced the delight of skimming sweetly over the water in an inboard-powered canoe, you’ll never want to pick up a paddle again. And even if you get a kick out of plying the paddle, you can cover a lot more territory with a given amount of effort if there’s a smooth little inboard engine to bring you back. The arrangement shown is light in weight, doesn’t occupy much space, and best of all, it’s relatively inexpensive.

2 page(s)

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Safe Moorings for the Boat Afloat and How to Build (Pub. No. 7826)

by William D. Jackson, N.A.

Every boat, regardless of how small or inexpensive it is, deserves a home or safe mooring of some kind where it may be protected from the elements. This does not have to be an elaborate structure nor need unusual precautions taken to insure safety of boats afloat. By making simple preparations, using easily acquired materials and a little effort and ingenuity, anyone can produce safe mooring equipment which will protect hulls afloat or ashore, depending upon your particular boat and location.

3 page(s)

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Demountable Cabin for Open Runabouts (Pub. No. 7827)

This raising and lowering top made of plywood and canvas will give your open boat many of the advantages of a small cabin cruiser and still can be easily removed whenever wished. Lowered for ordinary running the sides rest on the deck or gunwales making the entire structure so low it will not catch the wind, the light weight of the materials of which it is made together with this lowness, avoiding any tendency toward top-heaviness. Blankets and air mattresses, a box with food and galley supplies, spare clothes and odd gear in dunriage bags—everything you need for cruising—can be kept dry, and on long runs in damp or cold weather the idle member of the crew can crawl beneath for a snooze or smoke out of the wind or rain. At anchor or pulled up close to the beach the top is raised and its canvas sides tied down to give sitting up headroom.

4 page(s)

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Accessories for Your Boat (Pub. No. 7831)

Illustrations of a number of commonly used pieces of equipment, all inexpensively carved, cast or otherwise fabricated.

There is no reason why priorities and defense program shortages should affect the finishing up of your boat, for while it is true that certain items of marine hardware have become more expensive or hard to purchase, the average small-craft builder can make all the fittings, etc., that he will require, right in his own workshop. They will be as serviceable and long lasting as standard "store" accessories, though not quite as fancy, and will give you the satisfaction of knowing that your own handiwork is represented in your boat, down to the last detail. This article describes and illustrates a number of commonly used pieces of equipment, all easily and inexpensively carved, cast or otherwise fabricated.
Take a look at this other Data Sheet while you are at it! Make Your Own Sailboat Fittings

4 page(s)

$3.50
Sail Planning for the Amateur (Pub. No. 7835)

Whether you own a rowboat, a canoe, or motorboat, it can be made to sail. Even the most ancient records of boats show that sailing was an art that went hand in hand with that of boatbuildling. The first of man’s craft carried sails as an auxiliary to their oars and used them only when the wind blew in the direction in which the skipper wished to go. Galley slaves chained to their oars in the ancient Roman galleys paid homage to Boreas, the god of winds, because his aid meant a rest from their weary labors.

4 page(s)

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