Boatcraft & Fitting-Out

Sort By:  
Build this Cockpit Galley (Pub. No. 7893)

Any small-boat owner is grateful when he can dream up a scheme that will let him get more use from his limited floor space. The skipper of the craft shown did just that when he custom-built this cabinet. It provides a compact cooking center, a storage locker and a companion helmsman’s seat. Lacking standing headroom and adequate walking-around space, the cabin was ruled out as the place to locate a galley. But once it was decided to put the galley in the cockpit, two conditions had to be met: It had to be compact, and it had to be out of the way whenever shipboard activities shifted to fishing, skiing, skin diving or cruising. The design shown meets these requirements because the center becomes a seat when the lid is closed. For user comfort, you can add a flotation cushion. Swing open the top and the galley is immediately ready to use. The molded fiberglass drainboard and sink is equipped with a combination spigot and pump attached by hose to a 5-gal. jerry can stored inside the cabinet. The sink empties through a fitting in the side of the hull via a rubber hose. The interior of the galley cabinet may be outfitted as desired to facilitate storage of cooking utensils and other kitchen supplies. The storage locker is convenient for similar storage and is within easy reach of the chef’s hands. The skipper used the original cabinet cupboard to stow life preservers which often are crammed into inaccessible corners of cabins.

2 page(s)

$3.50
One-man Car-top Boat loader (Pub. No. 7898)

by Lloyd M. Polentz

Loading and unloading our 14 ft. aluminum cartopper used to be such a nuisance that it hardly seemed worthwhile taking it along on camping trips. This simple boat loader solved all our problems and turned out to be better suited to our needs than any of the commercial loaders we have seen. We wanted something that would allow us to load and unload the boat without having to unhitch our camping trailer. This automatically ruled out all rear-loading designs, It also had to be compact and “self-storing,” not some special device we would have to erect each time we wanted to use it and which would take up precious storage space in car or trailer. The design we finally came up with is basically just a plywood platform equipped with a 2x4 loading bar. The bar has a pivot at one end and a caster on the other. A simple latch locks it parallel to the side of the platform during the first part of the loading process.

2 page(s)

$3.50
Troubleshooting an Outboard that won't start (Pub. No. 7900)

By Henry B. Notrom

Nothing defeats a boatman quicker than an outboard that refuses to start. Before you yank your arm off pulling the starter cord, or kill the battery on an electric start, take a few minutes to troubleshoot the problem.

3 page(s)

$3.50
How to Winterize a big Outboard (Pub. No. 7901)

by Henry B. Notrom

Preparing a large outboard motor, 40 hp and up, for winter is not as hard as you might think. Here’s how you do it and save money
.

Many owners of outboard motors in the 40-hp and larger class pay good money at the end of every boating season to let someone else winterize and store their engines. The size literally scares them from doing it themselves. However, a large motor is just as simple to service as a smaller engine. And the only problem, size, is easily taken care of by buying or building an outboard stand.

2 page(s)

$3.50
Towing beats Rowing (Pub. No. 7902)

by W. S. Kals

Half a gale was building a tough sea the night the motor quit.

The 18-foot boat was only 400 yards from the safety of a breakwater. But wind and current were against the skipper. He was being blown out toward the middle of a turbulent sound. A larger cabin cruiser nosed out of the harbor and spotted the distressed boat. The captain tried desperately to throw a line to the smaller boat. But the seas were running high, and it was impossible to get close enough. Whether you boat in heavy seas or in calm water, at some time you’ll either need a tow or be asked to tow a boat in distress. Everyone should know the basic towing practices, and how to get a line between the boats. But who throws the line to whom has always worried some boatmen. Some say that if the rescue boat throws a line to the distressed boat, the rescuer becomes liable for anything that happens to the boat in tow. This is not so, according to marine insurance experts. Liability generally rests with the distressed boat. The only time there’s a question of change in liability is when a boat captain attempts to tow another boat without a request for assistance. A request for help can be given verbally—-”I need a hand”—or by signal. As a matter of courtesy, though, the distressed boat should provide the tow line. Should the line fray or break it’s not a loss for the skipper who’s helping. Towing a boat and getting a tow line rigged can be tricky. How to do it in different situations is explained in the next three pages.

3 page(s)

$3.50
Build this Double-Deck boat port (Pub. No. 7903)

by Hank Clark

Here's an idea for a project that can be tackled in any number of different ways, depending on your location, boat and the amount of money available.

This deluxe boat port with its roomy sundeck high above the water was originally just a pair of rock-crib piers jutting out from the shore. They were rigid and strong enough to support the roof/sundeck structure with no problem. Thus, if you don’t have a dock, you can easily split the work into two separate projects by building the foundation rock-crib dock one season and adding the roof sometime during the following year. If you already have a similar dock layout but it isn’t strong enough to support a roof, it’s possible to build the roof structure independent of the dock. The supporting posts can either be pointed and driven into the lake bottom or cut square so as to rest on flat cement blocks or flagstones laid on the bottom. They can be secured to the existing dock with lag bolts at the inside corners of each crib. Tailor dimensions to suit the contour of the lake bottom and the size of your boat. If you want still more protection, just add walls and you have a boathouse.  

2 page(s)

$3.50
In's and Out's of Electric Starting, The (Pub. No. 7904)

by Henry B. Notrom

If your electric starting system is acting up, chances are the starter itself isn't to blame. Knowing what can go wrong is half the battle.

Here's just one big difference between your electric-starting outboard and the smaller manual-starting engine you probably traded in on it. When the manual starter, you provided the pull power needed to get the engine revving. With the electric-starting engine, the pull is provided by the starting circuit. When you turn the ignition key, electricity is fed to the starter by the battery via the solenoid. The starter is nothing more than an electric motor which converts the electricity it receives to mechanical energy. The electricity spins and sends forward a shaft in the starter, at the end of which is a gear called the pinion drive. This engages the flywheel causing it to spin and start the engine. Once the engine starts, the pinion disengages, the starter comes to a peaceful halt and it lies at rest until needed again. It's as simple as that.  In spite of this, however, trouble can develope in the starting circuit. There are generally only five possibilities to check out.

3 page(s)

$3.50
Winterize Your Outboard (Pub. No. 7905)

by Henry R. Notrom

Planning to use your motor this winter? Here's how to set it up for cold-weather operation.

This may surprise a lot of summertime skippers, but many people north of the Maxon-Dixon Line run their boats right through the winter. Actually, there's no real reason why your outboard should go into storage the minute the weather turns cold. It'll troll just as well under freezing conditions as it did back in July. And on a crisp clear December afternoon, even a plain old boat ride can turn out to be a lot of fun. It's like a two-cycle sleigh ride.

3 page(s)

$3.50
Troubleshooting Remote Controls (Pub. No. 7906)

by Henry B. Notrom

You're more likely to have trouble with the cable than the box, but here's the A-B-C procedure for finding out what's wrong and how to put it right.

The great thing about trouble-shooting remote controls is that they're relatively simple gadgets. Nine times out of ten, you can locate the cause of a malfunction by checking a couple of critical areas. The key to finding out what's wrong lies in following a set and orderly procedure. With so many different remote-control units on today's market, however, it's impossible to give specific trouble-shooting information on every single one. Thus, we'll cover the possible areas of failure in any control and let you apply this to your particular unit, wheter it's single or dual-lever, mechanical or electrical.

3 page(s)

$3.50
Build this Carbon Arc Welder for Little Money (Pub. No. 7907)

by Paul Scott

Actually its hard to tell just how little you can build this useful tool for because the components you'll need to construct this versatile, resistance-type welder are standard items that can be bought in almost any hardware or electrical-supply outlet. The welder is versatile indeed, for although it weighs less than a pound and is only 14-in. long, it nevertheless places a heating potention of better than 10,000 degrees F. at your command. Just plug the welder in any 110-v.a.c. outlet, adjust the width of the arc, and you'll be able to braze, weld or solder most metals found in the home boatshop.

2 page(s)

$3.50
Troubleshooting Your Outboard by Ear (Pub. No. 7908)

by Henry B. Notrom

Don't turn a deaf ear when your engine tries to tell you something. Lean to understand its complaints and you can save a potful of money.

Like waves slapping the hull or wind whistling past the windshield, the quiet purr of a well-tuned outboard is a sound your ear tends to ignore. It's part of the normal background noise of boating. But let that engine start missing or knocking and suddenly it drowns out everything else. It's like a cry for help. Being able to understand your engine's distress calls can save you time, trouble, money, or all three, depending on just how serious the problem happens to be. Often it's something minor--just a matter of tightening a bolt or resetting an adjustment--but it may be an early warning of a critical malfunction.

4 page(s)

$3.50
Starting a Stubborn Outboard (Pub. No. 7910)

by Henry B. Notrom

There you sit in the middle of the lake. You've been fishing, it's getting dark and you want to go home. But your engine won't start.

Cheer up. According tot he outboard manufactuerers, a little simple trouble-shooting will solve your problem in nine out of ten cases. The question is, where to you begin. There are some 20 failings that can keep an outboard from starting, so you'll have to follow a logical, step-by-step procedure to find the one troubling your engine.

3 page(s)

$3.50
Auto/Marine Conversion Question, The (Pub. No. 7912)

by Sam Rabl

We have received quite a number of letters asking our opinion and advice on installing an automobile engine in a boat. We have often stated that it could be done satisfactorily and on several occasions have been severely criticized after doing so because such and such a contemporary magazine devoted exclusively to boating condemns the practice. We have read articles in these magazines that have actually made us afraid to ride behind the auto engine in its native element! Let us analyze this situation and see why the boating magazines will condemn the installation of an auto engine while hundreds of auto engines after several years of use ashore will go out and earn a living for some poor tidewater fisherman. We will find part of the answer in the costly ads carried by the marine motor manufacturers in the pages of these magazines, yet, paradoxical as it seems, we will find a small sprinkling of ads for conversion parts for auto engines in the same issue that condemns the practice of using them! Let me say at the start that if I had a free choice between auto and marine engines I would choose the marine, but this would not stop me from putting a converted auto engine in my boat until such a time as I could afford a real marine motor. Auto engines were designed for a specific purpose, just as were marine and aviation engines, but auto engines have flown, and aviation engines have driven boats, so there you are! My first piece of advice on the installation of an auto engine in a boat is to install as few home-made conversion parts as necessary to make a satisfactory installation. It has been my experience that it is the conversion gadgets that give the mostt trouble. Most of the fisherman installations use only a water pump and a universal joint. These installations are going out daily and doing their stuff in a manner that disproves for all time the old bunk that an auto-engine will not work in a boat. All the rot that has been written on the subject can be nullified by one visit to any fishing village and hearing the fishermen brag of their Fords, Chevvys and Buicks, and they are not talking about their cars but their boat motors.

3 page(s)

$3.50
Collapsible Pneumatic Raft (Pub. No. 7914)

by Bertram Brownold

The raft illustrated measures fifty-four by fifty-four and one-half inches when in use and can be rolled into a cylinder fifty-four inches long by eight inches thick when being transported or stored. It is made of a platform of ash strips superimposed upon, and tied to, four inner tubes each of which measures twenty-seven inches in diameter when inflated. The ash strips measure 54” long, 2” wide and %“ thick. There are twenty-two of them and they are spaced one-half inch apart, being held together~by two ropes.

2 page(s)

$3.50
How to Keep an Old Deck in Good Condition (Pub. No. 7916)

Nowhere about a boat does age or neglect show as quickly as in the condition of the deck and cabin top, while nothing spoils her appearance or detracts from a boat’s value more than a cracked canvas deck or a poorly cared for wooden one with leaking open seams. Keeping any deck in shape is a problem. A canvassed deck or cabin top kept painted with the same high gloss deck enamel which looked so well when you bought your boat will invariably develop minute cracks or checks within three years time. No amount of subsequent sanding and painting will entirely obliterate these; indeed as time goes on and the paint film becomes thicker the cracks will grow deeper, reaching down into the canvas itself and in many cases causing leaks that will make either patching or complete replacement necessary.

4 page(s)

$3.50
Conditioning that Good Engine (Pub. No. 7919)

by Charles R. Peyton

The necessary steps in preparing your motor for the winter lay-up are as follows: First, drain all the water out of the cooling system, as in Fig. 1. For simplicity of illustration, a single-cylinder engine is represented in diagram, and the principle involved is the same for all types of marine engines. Next, disconnect salt-water intake, attach a hose, immerse it in a bucket of fresh water and start the engine to pump through and flush the entire system, cylinder jacket, piping, etc. Run several buckets through (Fig. 2), and finish up with a quart or so of kerosene. This will leave a protecting film in the cast-iron jacket as well as in other parts of the cooling system (3). A good marine engine will last twenty years and more if given proper care and is overhauled every year. The photograph illustrates a sturdy one-cylinder that has had exceedingly rough going and yet, after an annual overhauling runs better each succeeding year—and with negligible expense for replacements.

3 page(s)

$3.50
How to Moor the Small Boat (Pub. No. 7922)

by Sam Rabl

Insuraance statistics of marine casuallties show that over forty per cent of damages paid are caused by bad anchor devices. Many an owner will lavish money on expensive fittings for his boat and then through either ignorance or a desire to save money on an accessory that is not visible will trust her future to inferior ground tackle. There are as many kinds of anchors as there are boats; they range from the humble block of a discarded auto motor to the expensive bronze anchors of the folding type.

3 page(s)

$3.50
Care and Repair of Inflatables, The (Pub. No. 7923)

by A.J. (Jib) McMasters

Inflatables are very popular. The reason for their success is several-fold. They’re relatively inexpensive, easy to store, tough and long-lived (12 to 15 yrs.) and easy to maintain. But like everything else, they last longer and perform better if you treat them right. Boatmen who have not had experience with inflatables often wonder whether the boat won’t pop if they hit a sharp object. The heavyweight cloth used in the top brands is ripstop nylon which, of course, is rot-free. The water-proofing is a neoprene/hypalon mixture which has demonstrated long life. There is only 2 to 3 lbs. of pressure in the tubes so even if they’re slashed with a knife, the air only oozes out. In water it is almost impossible to damage an inflatable. It is around shore that problems occur. Heres how to take care of them.

1 page(s)

$3.50
Basics of Brazing, The (Pub. No. 7925)

by John Capotosto

When solder won’t stick it but you or your equipment aren’t quite up to welding, you can braze. Brazing produces joints on metal parts that are almost as strong as welds but that take a lot less heat. Since you aren’t working with a puddle of molten steel, brazing also is easier and safer. In fact, the technique is quite similar to soft soldering, only you use a bit more heat and the filler is silver, brass or bronze wire instead of lead-tin solder. Newly introduced torches put brazing within the capabilities of home builders. Done right, a brazed joint in stainless can have a tensile strength of 133,000 lbs. per sq. in.—stronger than the base metals. And, unlike welding, brazing can join dissimilar metals. You can’t weld copper to cast iron or copper to steel but brazing them is easy. You can’t even weld dissimilar steels—tool steel to carbon steel—but they braze. Brazing also is good for malleable iron castings—in fact, any metal that melts at a higher temperature than the brazing rod. About 800°F. Since you braze at temperatures much lower than the melting points of the parts, you don’t have to contend with distortion and warping, two factors that plague even skilled welders. Beginners have it harder.

4 page(s)

$3.50
Converting a Rowboat to Sail (Pub. No. 7926)

by Albert S. Jetter

If you have a rowboat and want to turn it into a sailboat, the job is fairly easy. A boat about 8 ft. long is ideal. If yours is a little smaller or bigger, you can still use the instructions we give. The dimensions on our drawings are for approximate guidance only. But stick to the 7- to 9-ft. range so you won’t get into the design complications that come with something larger. Think of the conversion as a project broken down into four steps — daggerboard and trunk; rudder; mast and boom; rigging, sails and fittings.

4 page(s)

$3.50
Per Page      141 - 160 of 171
More books