Painting, Varnishing & Finishing 

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Applying a Boat's Name (Pub. No. 5629)

(Painting, Gold Leafing and Carving a Name Board)

Applying the name to a new craft is one of a boat owner’s proudest moments. It allows an individual’s imagination or sense of humor free rein. But then comes the problem of applying the name to the craft’s transom, or on the topsides aft if the transom is occupied by twin outboards. If you have the confidence and skill to do the lettering yourself, you have more latitude in designihg the name and style. But for most people, the safest way to obtain the best results is to transfer letters which are available from a marine or art supply store. This, however, still demands some planning and design. There also are wooden, plastic or metallic letters that are applied with brass fasteners. But these often have a tendency to get broken and fall off. Here are several better ways to do this pleasant task.

10 pages

$7.95
Varnishing and Enameling Below Decks (Pub. No. 7762)

As nice as it looks in the beginning, varnished mahogany or teak below decks can, over the years, give a claustrophobic feeling to your boat’s cabin. You can, however, obtain an elegant, airy interior by refinishing the bulkheads and door panels in an off-white yacht enamel while keeping all trim, door-jambs, molding, grab rails, and shelves brightwork. The expanse of bright, satin-smooth enamel paint surrounded by gleaming varnish work is a traditional and extremely handsome finish.

4 page(s)

$3.50
Refinishing a Wooden Spar (Pub. No. 7763)

Every season, wooden spars are normally given two coats of varnish. In time, however, the varnish coating breaks down due to chafe, hard knocks, and weathering, and water penetrates the coating. Yellowing, darkening, blisters, and black spots are signs that the time has come to “wood down” the spar-—strip it of all the coating down to bare wood. This is a very satisfying kind of project, not only because wood is so nice to work with, but also because a spar of Sitka spruce, for example, is a structure of great strength and beauty, and deserves as handsome a coating as possible. To refinish a wooden spar, follow these steps.

2 page(s)

$3.50
Refinishing Superstructure Brightwork (Pub. No. 7764)

Generally, brightwork means the bright look of finely grained wood that has received a number of coats of clear varnish or some other clear coating. While brightwork requires more work than some other types of coatings, many boat owners feel that the results obtained are well worthwhile.

2 page(s)

$3.50
Painting the Cabin Overhead (Pub. No. 7765)

If the cabin overhead of a fiberglass boat has mildewed, or suffered from deck leaks, fumes from kerosene lamps or the galley stove, then a paint job can bring it back to “yacht” condition. High-gloss enamel is the easiest surface to keep clean and it will brighten up a dark cabin with its reflectivity. Assuming the cabin ceiling is a fiberglass gel coat (or liner) or sprayed polyester resin, and that any deck leaks have been repaired, follow these steps:.

2 page(s)

$3.50
Refinishing A Teak and Holly Cabin Sole (Pub. No. 7766)

No other surface on a boat takes as much abuse as a cabin sole. Tools and beverage cans are always dropping on it and breaking through the protective varnish. Then water seeps in, yellowing and blistering the surface. Fortunately, the sole is easy to bring back into good condition because it is a flat, horizontal surface that is convenient to work on. Today’s refinishing materials ensure that this project can be done quickly with excellent results. To refinish a teak and holly cabin sole, follow these steps.

2 page(s)

$3.50
Painting Metal Surfaces (Pub. No. 7767)

Unless the metal fixtures aboard your boat are chrome-plated or stainless steel, they are susceptible to corrosion. Bronze takes on an unsightly patina. In a saltwater environment, aluminum pits and white powdery corrosion forms around the fittings. Here is how to protect some common metal items on board.

3 page(s)

$3.50
Painting an Inboard Engine (Pub. No. 7768)

A spotless, glossy engine is the hallmark of responsible boat maintenance. If the inboard engine’s factory paint job has faded, or if rust is beginning to form, some touching up is in order. Before tackling the job of painting the engine, however, give some careful consideration to the task.

3 page(s)

$3.50
Bottom Painting (Pub. No. 7769)

Painting a boat’s bottom is one chore that cannot be avoided by the saltwater boater. A neglected hull bottom inevitably gets worse, making the boat slower in the water, and the cost of the inevitable maintenance job skyrockets. Before getting into painting a boat’s bottom, it is useful to know how bottom, or anti-fouling, paint works.

3 page(s)

$3.50
Boot-Tops and Boat Stripes (Pub. No. 7770)

A boottop is the traditional stripe at a craft’s waterline. It is used to indicate an area between the waterlines of a ship when it is fully loaded and unloaded. On pleasure craft, however, the boottop is mostly decorative and varies in its location. Some boats have a decorative stripe just below their rail. In fact, there is no law that says you cannot paint a stripe up the mast if you wish. A popular way to apply a stripe along a hull today is not to paint it at all, but to do it with tape made for that purpose. Paint manufacturers, however, still make boottop paint and many boat owners still prefer to paint their own stripes.

4 page(s)

$3.50
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