Tools, Materials and Advice 

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Up-Date Your Boat Trailer (Pub. No. 7042)

by Fred W. Goette III

There's no need to part with a tried-and-true boat trailer just because you've bought a new boat not even if it's a cat or trimaron. Here's how you can modify it to suit your boat and do away with wet-foot launchings at the same time

It's easy to envy the owner of a modern low-slung boat trailer as he launches his boat in minutes with hardly a splash. But the advantages of older trailers, such as good road clearance and tires that interchange with those on your car, can hardly be denied. You can have all of these features working for you at once by outfitting your trailer with up-to-date equipment that costs only $24 for a single-keel, 14-ft. boat. Or, if you ve bought a new multi-hull boat, you can custom fit your present trailer to it with a similar setup for each keel.

4 page(s)

$3.50
How to "Glass" a boat (Pub. No. 5476)

by George Emory

All you need to know about fabrics, resins and application techniques to turn out a perfect job.

A new fabric-resin skin will not only strengthen your wood hull and improve its appearance, but also cut your seasonal maintenance to a mere sponge-and-water rinse. Strictly speaking, “glassing” means covering a hull with fiberglass fabric and resin. However, other fabrics having different characteristics are often used to cover boat hulls (people speak of “fiberglassing with Dynel”), so the first step is picking a fabric with the quality you need most. This could be maximum strength or minimum weight. Or, you might want a flexible, abrasion-resistant skin, or decking with a built-in nonskid surface. The fabrics that lead the field (many others have been tried) are fiberglass, Dynel, Vectra and canvas.

8 pages

$6.95
Make Your Own Hole Saws of Any Diameter (Pub. No. 7708)

by Alvin Youngquist

The home made saws illustrated for cutting holes up to 12" in diameter were developed for cutting lightening and ventilating holes in boat frames, but can also be used for a variety of purposes. The cutters shown cut through 3/8" plywood; however, by turning the stock over and cutting from the other side, it will cut through 3/4" stock. The saws can be used in a hand drill press or an electric hand drill, or electric drill press. The saws are easy to make, and save a great deal of time if there are a number of holes to be cut.

1 page(s)

$3.50
Build this Carbon Arc Welder for Little Money (Pub. No. 7907)

by Paul Scott

Actually its hard to tell just how little you can build this useful tool for because the components you'll need to construct this versatile, resistance-type welder are standard items that can be bought in almost any hardware or electrical-supply outlet. The welder is versatile indeed, for although it weighs less than a pound and is only 14-in. long, it nevertheless places a heating potention of better than 10,000 degrees F. at your command. Just plug the welder in any 110-v.a.c. outlet, adjust the width of the arc, and you'll be able to braze, weld or solder most metals found in the home boatshop.

2 page(s)

$3.50
Basics of Brazing, The (Pub. No. 7925)

by John Capotosto

When solder won’t stick it but you or your equipment aren’t quite up to welding, you can braze. Brazing produces joints on metal parts that are almost as strong as welds but that take a lot less heat. Since you aren’t working with a puddle of molten steel, brazing also is easier and safer. In fact, the technique is quite similar to soft soldering, only you use a bit more heat and the filler is silver, brass or bronze wire instead of lead-tin solder. Newly introduced torches put brazing within the capabilities of home builders. Done right, a brazed joint in stainless can have a tensile strength of 133,000 lbs. per sq. in.—stronger than the base metals. And, unlike welding, brazing can join dissimilar metals. You can’t weld copper to cast iron or copper to steel but brazing them is easy. You can’t even weld dissimilar steels—tool steel to carbon steel—but they braze. Brazing also is good for malleable iron castings—in fact, any metal that melts at a higher temperature than the brazing rod. About 800°F. Since you braze at temperatures much lower than the melting points of the parts, you don’t have to contend with distortion and warping, two factors that plague even skilled welders. Beginners have it harder.

4 page(s)

$3.50
How to choose Binoculars (Pub. No. 7927)

Good glasses can be highly useful to the outdoorsman and boatman, whether purchased new, or second-hand, maybe in a swap. The important word is “good,” for bad glasses are an abomination. Yet there can be a difference of perhaps $20-$30 between binoculars that to a casual eye seem virtually identical. Naturally you’d want the less expensive pair. Sometimes they can be as good as the more costly glasses. Sometimes not, and you’re better off paying extra. How do you tell the difference?

4 page(s)

$3.50
Guide to Sandpaper and other Coated Abrasives (Pub. No. 7928)

by Ray Hill

Coated abrasives. All boat-builders call on them. Knowing which type and grade of abrasive to use, and how to use it, can spell the difference between a finished job that looks rough and amateurish, or one that’s super smooth and professional. A coated abrasive, regardless of its shape (disk, sheet, drum), is a single layer of abrasive grain bonded to a flexible backing on which an adhesive layer, the “make coat,” has been deposited. Before it dries, the abrasive grain is implanted in the adhesive; then a second adhesive layer, the “size coat,” is deposited over the abrasive grain to further anchor it to the backing.

2 page(s)

$3.50
Sharpenings Secrets of a Pro (Pub. No. 7930)

by John A Juranitch

You can get a razor edge on all of your tools and knives by following these simple steps.

Considering how long people have been using sharpened edges, you’d think we’d know a lot about them. But most people—even professionals in the field—don’t. I’ve seen men who have been sharpening knives for half a century and still have little idea of what they’re doing. We’ve found that the largest meat-packing companies in the world don’t know what to tell new employees when it comes to sharpening. Before I get down to the secrets of sharpening, let me tell you some of the things we’ve learned that aren’t true. First, despite what you hear to the contrary, fine manufactured hones are far superior to the natural ones. That’s not to say that natural hones are no good; they’re just highly overrated.

4 page(s)

$3.50
Building with C-Flex (Pub. No. 7932)

by Bill McKeown

There are some outstanding new ways to build yourself a boat these days. Quicker, easier and better than many methods of the past, they are particularly suitable for constructing one boat at home. True, you can make a mold and pop out faster, cheaper hulls, perhaps. But complications and government requirements of building boats for sale are best left to the professionals. A “one-off” method like that described here is preferable for a handyman. (Coast Guard booklet 466, Safety Standards for Backyard Boat Builders, is also worth getting from the U.S. Coast Guard, Washington, D.C. 20590. It covers hull identification number and safety requirements.) This Data Sheet gives some tips on using this flexible material.

4 page(s)

$3.50
Benchtop Vise for Tricky Holds (Pub. No. 7933)

by Richard M. Gutter

A pair of pipe clamps and scrap material make this super holder.

My benchtop vise was originally made to hold picture-frame molding for routing. It proved ideal for holding the thin strips of molding, since it supports them securely along their entire length at a convenient height. It also serves as a sort of production fixture for turning out a number of identical pieces quickly and easily. A pair of pipe clamps (perhaps you already have them hanging in a corner of your workshop), several U-bolts, a pair of eyebolts and a couple of boards are all it takes to make the vise. It can do a job equal to many on the market which cost considerably more. If you buy the pipe clamps and the needed hardware, the vise will cost about $20. If you already have the clamps, about $5 worth of hardware will put you in business.

2 page(s)

$3.50
Easy-To-Make Solar Cooker (Pub. No. 7941)

Boiling water for coffee or heating up a can of soup is a cinch on any of the little backpacking stoves. But with a solar cooker? Sun-powered ovens are well known, burning glasses have existed as long as lenses but a solar stove is something new under the sun. Now the availability of low cost plastic Fresnel lenses makes a lightweight sun-powered folding camp cooker possible and even inexpensive if you build it yourself. This solar stove is practical. It boils enough water for a cup of coffee in a few minutes and takes a little longer to heat a can of soup. It folds compactly and has no loose bits of hardware to get lost. It weighs just 2 lbs. You don’t have to lug fuel for it. But, unfortunately, it works only when the sun shines.

4 page(s)

$3.50
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