Engines 

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Installing a Small Air-Cooled Inboard Engine (Pub. No. 5219)

by J.A. Emmett

Little air-cooled engines offer a solution to the power problem of the owner of a small boat who wants the economy, simplicity, and dependability of an inboard engine without its drawbacks in the way of weight and cost. Models from 1/2 to 5 horsepower can now be had from several different manufacturers at reasonable prices; they may drive direct, have a one-way clutch to permit starting the engine at the dock, or be fully equipped with clutch and reverse gear to give maneuvering ability under power. Weights range from under 100 lbs., for the small size up to 200 lbs., for a fully equipped five horse motor. Then there are the new high-speed lightweight models developed along the line of an outboard motor power head but with transmission arranged to run through the bottom of the boat which weigh as little as 42 lbs. for a 21/2 h. p. size.

8 pages

$6.95
Power Your Boat With a Converted Model A Engine (Pub. No. 5273)

by Orville G. Bolstad, Consulting Engineer

(Or use the same principles to convert a modern overhead valve engine).

In looking around for an auto engine to convert for marine use in the 16 ft. runabout I was building, I pictured in my mind a rugged, reliable 4 cylinder motor of about 50 hp. Immediately it reminded me of the time, 15 years ago, when I had used a Ford Model "A" motor in a propeller-driven sled over the snowbound roads of North Dakota. Remembering how well this motor had served me, with the sled loaded down with cargo and the motor turning hour after hour at 2400 rpm, I decided to use a Model "A". And the plan worked. It doesn’t pay to turn the motor any faster than this, as 2400 rpm is about the peak of the power curve.

12 pages, 2 plate(s)

$7.95
Installing Built-in Fuel Tanks (Pub. No. 7041)

Here's how to extend the range of your power boat.

If you aleady own or are thinking of building one of the popular large outboard boats, powered with one of the new big engines, you may want to consider the advantages of built-in tanks. Extra capacity tanks will give you increased range and much more independence from gas docks. They are also considerably easier to fill. But even more important is the safety factor, since the larger tanks eliminate the need to transfer gas from one can to another during a long run. Any time gas is poured from one can to another in a boat there is an excellent chance that some of the explosive gas fumes will be trapped in the boat's bilge. If these ever ignite, you are liable to make unhappy headlines. For really good remote tank operation, outboard engines should be equipped with suction-type fuel pumps. The pressure system used on many engines works very successfully with 6-gal. portable cans, but has serious drawbacks when larger tanks are pressurized. If the fuel level is low in a 20-gal. tank, it may take half an hour to build enough pressure to get the boat in operation. So if your engine has a pressure fuel system, change it to a fuel pump, for reliable, trouble-free large tank operation. The changeover is simple to make and relatively inexpensive.

2 page(s)

$3.50
When the Auto Engine Goes to Sea (Pub. No. 5352)

by Hank Holcomb

Save several hundred dollars by doing your own engine conversion.

Not so very long ago, if you had suggested to an inboard motor dealer the iden of converting an automobile engine to marine use, he would probably have raised his eyebrows, patted you on the shoulder condescendingly and said, “Well, Mr. Smith, automobile engines are fine in automobiles, but wouldn’t you rather have a regular marine engine in your boat, something that was designed specifically for a boat?” Nowadays, however, the motor dealer is not so quick to sneer at the marine conversion. He knows that in the last two or three years the boating public has grown considerably wiser regarding such thingss. Many boaters are aware that, in fact, nearly all so-called marine engines of less than 400 hp. are simply converted automobile, truck and industrial engines no matter what you call them. He has learned that manufacturers of regular marine engines buy them and convert them in their factories, in much the same manner as we are going to show you, and then sell them under their corporate name or catchier trade names as marine engines.

11 pages

$7.95
Silent Fishing Partner (Pub. No. 5355)

by Harold P. Strand

An electrically-powered outboard that you can build yourself that fills the bill for children's boats, trolling, and canvas fold-boats,

Fisherman, father, or small boat fan, you’ll find plenty of use for an electric outboard. Designed especially for fishermen who take their trolling seriously, it will also get you on many of the new reservoirs where fishing is prime, but gasoline motors are prohibited. Light weight and silent operation make the electric a partner for kayak-type folding craft and the easiest rig for kids to use while learning their outboard seamanship. The basic design calls for a 6-volt automotive-type generator adapted by resistance controls to be powered by a 12-volt, 66-plate battery. Heavier-duty batteries will, of course, provide longer running times before recharging is necessary. The photograph shows the finished trolling motor mounted on transom alongside a larger outboard; electric is always ready for trolling use. Tested in this way with a 600-lb. gross load, six hours of trollingwere obtained from a single battery charge with continuous speeds of 3-4 mph.

8 pages, 5 plate(s)

$7.95
Propellers for Auxiliaries (Pub. No. 5443)

by Philip L. Rhodes

Ever since auxiliary power became a practical necessity on cruising sailboats there has been a continual battle of opinion regarding the best location for the propeller. While other positions are not out of the realm of possibility, auxiliary propellers generally are placed either (A) on the centerline in an aperture in the deadwood and rudder, (B) off-center where the shaft and heel are supported by a strut, or (C) on the centerline with the wheel completely abaft the hull and rudder where the propeller shaft extends past the stern post or, more recently, through the rudder stock in the manner devised by Paine. The purpose of these notes is to consider the relative merits of these three propeller positions as they affect the performance of a boat both under sail and under power.

8 pages

$6.95
Right Prop for Your Boat, The (Pub. No. 5479)

by Art Mikesell

There’s a good chance that you can get a boost in performance by switching props. To find out for sure, try this easy test
.

The sole function of a propeller is to turn power into push. With the right prop your boat will be a joy to operate, an agile, responsive rig running at top efficiency. Any other prop is a step in the wrong direction, because it won’t deliver all the push your engine can provide. Most boats today are running with props that do not quite match the requirements of the motor, hull and boat owner. When you buy a motor, you have to choose a prop on the basis of the motor manufacturer’s recommendations as listed on a prop selection chart. These recommendations are based on horsepower, boat length, gross load and intended use. They’re designed to prevent you from making a bad error in prop selection by limiting your choice to a comparatively small number of propellers.

15 pages

$7.95
Improving Economy and Performance of Power Boats (Pub. No. 5632)

Fuel is precious—do not waste it! That is the message beamed to boaters and they should heed it not only for the sake of economy, but also to conserve a dwindling energy supply. For a number of reasons, however, the idea of saving anything appears to be repugnant to many who follow a “throwaway lifestyle,” so let us approach fuel saving from another angle—a way to make your favorite recrealion more enjoyable. And that is a fact—-you can get more fun out of boating and save fuel at the same time.

28 pages

$9.95
Measuring Propeller Pitch (Pub. No. 7717)

Two methods for measuring the pitch of your own propeller.

1 page(s)

$3.50
Install Power in your Canoe (Pub. No. 7815)

Once you’ve experienced the delight of skimming sweetly over the water in an inboard-powered canoe, you’ll never want to pick up a paddle again. And even if you get a kick out of plying the paddle, you can cover a lot more territory with a given amount of effort if there’s a smooth little inboard engine to bring you back. The arrangement shown is light in weight, doesn’t occupy much space, and best of all, it’s relatively inexpensive.

2 page(s)

$3.50
Pump Tilt to Trim Your Outboard (Pub. No. 7870)

by Walter B. Chandler Jr.

You can make your own power-tilt mechanism for very little money.

Most outboard engines have pin holes to allow adjustments that fix the angle between your lower unit and the transom. Now the larger motors have standard or optional power-tilt arrangements to permit tilting up your prop when you’re beaching your boat or running in shallow water, trimming your lower unit for the best angle when getting up on plane and trying for the most speed or running on an even keel with various loads aboard. But if your older outboard doesn’t have a power-trim kit available, you can make your own as I did. Basic parts required are a hydraulic power pump, hydraulic cylinder, lower tilt bracket and upper tilt bracket.

2 page(s)

$3.50
Bargain Guage for Gas Consumption (Pub. No. 7871)

by Robert D. Stearns

Ease your outboard’s offshore energy costs with this $3 jug test.

Fuel costs make knowing the gasoline consumption of your outboard more important than ever. If you can figure out in advance your most efficient cruising speed, miles per gallon and range of action on a tank of gas, you’re sure to increase your boating safety and enjoyment. Most large outboards burn about one galion per 10 hp per hour at full throttle. A 100-hp mill uses up approximately 10 gph wide open, but a 10 percent reduction in rpm can cut gas consumption by 20 percent, while an 80 percent drop in rpm may mean a 35 percent gas saving. These averages apply generally to planing hulls riding over, rather than through, the water, but they can vary greatly from boat to boat with different-size motors and loads. It’s certainly worth the small amount of time and expense, using the method shown here, to determine what your fuel requirements really are. Almost any outboard with separate fuel tank can be tested; with adaptations the system should also work for inboards.

2 page(s)

$3.50
Find the Best Prop for Your Boat on Paper--First (Pub. No. 7874)

By Jim Martenhoff

Most boatmen understand that propeller pitch determines their boat’s performance. Too little pitch and the prop spins wastefully on an over-revving engine. Too much and the wheel (prop) slows down as the engine labors valiantly to drive it. You can play around with props on a trial-and-error basis, trying to find one that will match your boat’s hull shape, weight, and engine output. But that’s time-consuming and can be costly unless a dealer will lend you props to experiment with. Using two simple rules of thumb I’ve developed over many years, you can do the experimenting on paper with simple arithmetic .

2 page(s)

$3.50
Make Your Boat This Twin-Engine Synchronizer (Pub. No. 7883)

You can make a twin-outboard synchronizer for under $10 that works as well as a $55 instrument, better than twin tachometers or your ears. When you tap into the hot tach leads (see sketch), AC voltage from each flywheel alternator meets at the light. The faster the bulb flickers the greater the difference in engine speeds. When speeds match, the bulb glows steadily if voltages are 180° out of phase or goes out completely if voltages are in phase. A switch limits the bulb’s use to extend its life.

2 page(s)

$3.50
How to Figure Your Planing Speed (Pub. No. 7889)

by Jim Martenhoff

Knowing the fully loaded gross weight of a planing boat, and the horsepower, allows you to compute the probable optimum speed—-assuming the engine is tuned and delivering its rated hp, correct propeller is fitted, and the boat is properly trimmed. Here is a nomograph that tells you what top speed you can expect from your boat. If you know the hp, all you have to do is figure the gross weight, fully loaded.

2 page(s)

$3.50
Troubleshooting an Outboard that won't start (Pub. No. 7900)

By Henry B. Notrom

Nothing defeats a boatman quicker than an outboard that refuses to start. Before you yank your arm off pulling the starter cord, or kill the battery on an electric start, take a few minutes to troubleshoot the problem.

3 page(s)

$3.50
How to Winterize a big Outboard (Pub. No. 7901)

by Henry B. Notrom

Preparing a large outboard motor, 40 hp and up, for winter is not as hard as you might think. Here’s how you do it and save money
.

Many owners of outboard motors in the 40-hp and larger class pay good money at the end of every boating season to let someone else winterize and store their engines. The size literally scares them from doing it themselves. However, a large motor is just as simple to service as a smaller engine. And the only problem, size, is easily taken care of by buying or building an outboard stand.

2 page(s)

$3.50
In's and Out's of Electric Starting, The (Pub. No. 7904)

by Henry B. Notrom

If your electric starting system is acting up, chances are the starter itself isn't to blame. Knowing what can go wrong is half the battle.

Here's just one big difference between your electric-starting outboard and the smaller manual-starting engine you probably traded in on it. When the manual starter, you provided the pull power needed to get the engine revving. With the electric-starting engine, the pull is provided by the starting circuit. When you turn the ignition key, electricity is fed to the starter by the battery via the solenoid. The starter is nothing more than an electric motor which converts the electricity it receives to mechanical energy. The electricity spins and sends forward a shaft in the starter, at the end of which is a gear called the pinion drive. This engages the flywheel causing it to spin and start the engine. Once the engine starts, the pinion disengages, the starter comes to a peaceful halt and it lies at rest until needed again. It's as simple as that.  In spite of this, however, trouble can develope in the starting circuit. There are generally only five possibilities to check out.

3 page(s)

$3.50
Winterize Your Outboard (Pub. No. 7905)

by Henry R. Notrom

Planning to use your motor this winter? Here's how to set it up for cold-weather operation.

This may surprise a lot of summertime skippers, but many people north of the Maxon-Dixon Line run their boats right through the winter. Actually, there's no real reason why your outboard should go into storage the minute the weather turns cold. It'll troll just as well under freezing conditions as it did back in July. And on a crisp clear December afternoon, even a plain old boat ride can turn out to be a lot of fun. It's like a two-cycle sleigh ride.

3 page(s)

$3.50
Troubleshooting Remote Controls (Pub. No. 7906)

by Henry B. Notrom

You're more likely to have trouble with the cable than the box, but here's the A-B-C procedure for finding out what's wrong and how to put it right.

The great thing about trouble-shooting remote controls is that they're relatively simple gadgets. Nine times out of ten, you can locate the cause of a malfunction by checking a couple of critical areas. The key to finding out what's wrong lies in following a set and orderly procedure. With so many different remote-control units on today's market, however, it's impossible to give specific trouble-shooting information on every single one. Thus, we'll cover the possible areas of failure in any control and let you apply this to your particular unit, wheter it's single or dual-lever, mechanical or electrical.

3 page(s)

$3.50
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