Sails and Rigging 

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Small Box Masts Can be Made of Plywood (Pub. No. 7055)

bv William F. Crosbv

A light, hollow mast makes an ideal spar for any boat. Naturally, every pound that is added above the waterline will become a handicap to stability and generally speaking the boat with the lightest mast is the best. The mast shown herewith has been designed` to be made of eighth inch waterproof plywood. Its strength is ample for the sail area that it would carry. The mast is eighteen feet four inches in length and has been designed to suit the plywood boat Pup. It is a square mast instead of the round type specified. Roughly figured, this mast, if built to the required size and of the materials specified, will weigh about sixteen pounds. A rectangular box-shaped mast of usual constrnction of the same dimensions would weigh about seventeen pounds. A solid mast of the same dimensions and material would weigh about twenty-five pounds. The mast shown would, therefore, weigh just about half what the solid mast would come to.

2 page(s)

$3.50
Basic Principles of Sails and Rigging (Pub. No. 5532)

 Sails, sails, sails--small wonder that the average beginner is a little at sea. Well he knows that a sail is nothing more or less than a piece of cloth used in propelling a boat through the water, but of the wide variety of types and of the various strings which control these different sails, his knowledge is painfully scant--so limited that a Ketch is often pointed out as a Yawl, a Knock-about is invariably given its family name of Sloop, and a Bermudian is off-times described in a manner which is not at all salt as, that sassy looking tub with the tipsy mast. In looking at some of these different types of sail, we will consider the location and shape only, for therein lies the key, in most cases, as to which class the boat belongs. First of all, that typical snub-nosed American, the Cat-rig, or rather Catboat, since the hull used with this type of sail is, half-consciously perhaps, always considered as part of the whole. You will notice that there is a single mast, set well forward, with a boom attached to the lower end and a gaff to the top or upper end. The sail is fastened to these three--mast, boom and gaff--and, being single, is naturally the mainsail; also, since the top or head of the sail is supported by a gaff, we have gaff-headed. Thus, a Cat-rig might be roughly described as a single, gaff-headed sail set on a mast well forward without any additions in the shape of either headsails or topsails or added spars. With the addition of a jib sail forward, and a change in the mast location, the Catboat becomes a Sloop, (from the Dutch Sloep). The Sloop rig is the commonest one-masted rig in America, being changed to suit various localities. Some of these changes have been unimportant; others have merited a new name for the rig thus evolved.

24 pages, 4 plate(s)

$9.95
Aerodynamics of Yacht Sails, The (Pub. No. 5713)

by Edward P. Warner and Shatswell Ober

The work described in this report is the outgrowth of a series of wind tunnel experiments on sails made at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology from 1915 to 1911 and of sundry attempts on the part of the writers to find relations between the performance of sails of a yacht and the wings of an airplane.
The work was done in the summer of 1913, being under the direction of the writers with the assistance of Messrs. John R. Markham, W. Laurence LePage, and James B. Ford. The yacht for the full-scale experiments was furnished by Mr. John S. Lawrence. He and Messrs. Livingston Davis, W. Starling Burgess, and others aided greatly in the course of the work through their experience and interest. The Marconi-rigged S class yacht Papoose was used in all the full-scale experiments. The yacht was fitted with racing sails of the usual cut, the leach being made as flat as possible. The mainsail ran up the mast on a track, and therefore pulled off from the centre of the mast at all times instead of being free to swing around the spar as it could if it were on hoops.

31 pages

$9.95
Ways to Repair or Replace Rigging (Pub. No. 5892)

Many different fittings have been devised to attach wire rope to a turnbuckle.

12 pages

$7.95
Easy Method of Making A Grooved Spar, An (Pub. No. 7709)

The making of tunneled or grooved spars usually requires special tools. The method described here enables the amateur with a limited number of tools in his workshop to make professional looking spars. Laminated construction sis used for both strength and simplicity.

1 page(s)

$3.50
Care and Repair of Sails (Pub. No. 7749)

It pays to keep your boat’s sails neat, clean, and in good repair, not only for the sake of appearance, but to prolong their life. Polyester, which is used in practically all sails today—except for nylon spinnakers—is a durable material, but not impervious to salt, sun, abrasion or mildew. Before putting them away, saltwater sailors should hose down their sails anytime they have been exposed to salt spray. Salt absorbs moisture and encourages mildew which can discolor even synthetic fabrics. The use of strong soaps and detergents should be avoided. Alkalis can make polyester cloth more sensitive to the weakening effect of ultraviolet light. Acids do the same for nylon.

4 page(s)

$3.50
Wire Rope Splicing (Pub. No. 7787)

by Francis G. Wachs

Splicing wire rope is a subject that is not readily understood, and even after one has grasped the idea of how it is done there still is a certain amount of practice required, depending on the skill of the individual, to make a good splice. But in my opinion a clear understanding of how it should be done is more than half the battle.

3 page(s)

$3.50
Sail Planning for the Amateur (Pub. No. 7835)

Whether you own a rowboat, a canoe, or motorboat, it can be made to sail. Even the most ancient records of boats show that sailing was an art that went hand in hand with that of boatbuildling. The first of man’s craft carried sails as an auxiliary to their oars and used them only when the wind blew in the direction in which the skipper wished to go. Galley slaves chained to their oars in the ancient Roman galleys paid homage to Boreas, the god of winds, because his aid meant a rest from their weary labors.

4 page(s)

$3.50
Its Easy to Make Your Own Sails (Pub. No. 7836)

by J. Julius Fanta

Sailmaking isn’t a difficult craft. For the cost of materials alone you can fit your boat with a suit of well-cut sails, by following these simple sailmaking rules.

2 page(s)

$3.50
Proper Design of Sheaves for Use with Wire Rope (Pub. No. 7860)

by Herbert Macmillan

Wire rope is used in rapidly increasing quantities on modern yachts—for standing rigging of all kinds, as well as for operating ropes. Operating ropes mean those ropes which move over sheaves and drums, such as halliards, topping lifts, anchor ropes, etc. When a wire rope constantly bends and straightens out over sheaves and drums the metallic wires gradually become fatigued and sooner or later the individual wires in the rope start to break. The length of service of any type of wire rope depends upon the proper design of sheaves and drums. The highest grade rope which it is possible to manufacture will have very short life if used improperly. This cannot be pointed out too strongly since most operating ropes on yachts are used with equipment which was never designed for wire rope. The purpose of this article is to explain how service life may be materially increased by proper design of sheaves used with wire rope yacht rigging.

4 page(s)

$3.50
Ingenious Main Halyard Latch Locks Sail Aloft (Pub. No. 7863)

It is generally acknowledged that the principal force acting upon the mast of a sailing yacht with the so-called Marconi rig is one of pure compression. It is desirable to reduce this compression as much as possible and also in big rigs, where the various strains are very great, to eliminate wear and strain on the wire halliard which experiences exceptional local stresses where it bends over the sheave or sheaves in the mast. In the big America’s Cup class yachts, where all these problems are acute, successful devices have been designed to reduce the compression on the mast and the strain on halliards by locking the mainsail aloft, once it is set. These devices have varied in form but all have been similar in principle. All have provided some sort of hook or latch aloft into which the headboard, or a link on the headboard, could engage and settle back into secure locked position, relieving all strain on the haliard but the halliard’s own weight. Locking the mainsail aloft, in some such way, cuts any compression caused by the mainsail and its halliard in half. The one shown and described here was designed by A.E. Luders, Jr., of the Luders Marine Cosntruction Co., Stamford, Connecticut. It is highly ingenious, quite simple, and as far as we can see, absolutely foolproof. It is operated entirely by the main halyard.

2 page(s)

$3.50
Basic Sailing Rig You Can Make (Pub. No. 7884)

by Les Stanwood

For centuries men have harnessed the power of the wind to drive their boats. In many parts of the world, the youngest child or most primitive boat builder can put together a good sailing rig. Which is why it seems ridiculous that so many American boatmen have allowed sailing to become almost the exclusive pastime of the Yacht Club set. Inexpensive, serviceable sailing rig can be added to almost any small boat with a minimum of tools and skill. Perhaps the best rig for small boats—and small budgets—is a setup known as the sprit rig. You won’t see it much down at the marina but it has long been a workhorse for the world’s fisher men.

3 page(s)

$3.50
Converting a Rowboat to Sail (Pub. No. 7926)

by Albert S. Jetter

If you have a rowboat and want to turn it into a sailboat, the job is fairly easy. A boat about 8 ft. long is ideal. If yours is a little smaller or bigger, you can still use the instructions we give. The dimensions on our drawings are for approximate guidance only. But stick to the 7- to 9-ft. range so you won’t get into the design complications that come with something larger. Think of the conversion as a project broken down into four steps — daggerboard and trunk; rudder; mast and boom; rigging, sails and fittings.

4 page(s)

$3.50
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