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Mariner--A Classic 19ft Raised Deck Cabin Cruiser (Pub. No. 5506)

by Edwin Monk.

This boat is a miniature of the boat illustrated, a larger cruiser designed by the author, a good sea boat of trim appearance that met with favorable comment. It is intended as a complete little cruiser for two or three, and contains a large cockpit, berths, galley, and toilet, which, after all, is the nucleus of any yacht. In the small cruiser it is difficult to turn out a nice-appearing hull and still have workable headroom. In this case the large hatch in the galley provides for this where it is most needed, and there is four feet six inches headroom under the trunk beams. Forward there is a man-sized hatch, and the boat may be made fast or anchor handled without climbing on deck. A folding card table will serve as a dining-table in the cockpit, and folding camp-stools are suggested; also a canvas cot will accommodate an extra voyager.

11 pages, 2 plate(s)

$7.95
Flash--A Snappy Classic 14' Runabout (Pub. No. 5536)

Feature for feature, and inch for inch, “Flash” offers more boat per dollar than many other craft. Here is a 14-footer which can be built in a reasonable length of time and, with the possible exception of the engine and equipment, at a nominal cost. She has generous freeboard, trim lines, and her single cockpit offers seating capacity for two or three persons . Powered with a 40 h. p. marine motor of standard make, “Flash” will show a speed of close to 28 miles per hour with the “mill” doing 3100 r.p.m. With a smaller, two cylinder motor of any make, she will make an excellent boat for cruising and fishing trips.

18 pages, 2 plate(s)

$8.95
Here's Dolphin (Pub. No. 5550)

This trailer boat, the "Dolphin", is the answer to low-cost travel over protected waters. The hull is light enough to be transported anywhere by trailer and the boat is of a size to be easily handled. It will accommodate two persons for extended trips or a party of four for day cruises and do it comfortably. Construction and operating costs are low. Plywood is used throughout, and the hull is designed to exact the utmost from low power motors. Any engine of 2½ to 8 horsepower will do. One like the U. S. Falcon 21/2 hp. water cooled marine engine will provide very low operating costs with a maximum number of miles per gallon of fuel consumed. This has been proved.

8 pages, 2 plate(s)

$7.95
Crack--An Outboard Runabout (Pub. No. 5551)

Crack! Yes-sir, just that—”of superior excellence,” as Mr. Webster puts it. Here is a double cockpit runabout, which, given a suitable motor, will perform in a smother of spray with whip-like speed. Even with the narrow beam of 52 in. which makes this high speed possible,  “Crack” is dry and seaworthy, the generous flare to the forward sections giving the craft great lifting power in a sea while keeping off the spray.  Looking her over, you will notice that “Crack” is an even 16 ft. long, thereby falling into a class of outboards which need not be numbered. There are two cockpits, each comfortably seating two passengers. Complete remote control is possible with a short-type steerer with gas, choke and starter cables to an electricstarting outboard motor. There is a small hatch immediately forward of the motor well which allows of the installation of a reserve gas tank, storage battery, autopulse or other necessary equipment; otherwise, the hatch gives plenty of stowage space for clothing, fishing tackle and the like. The forward part of the boat is accessible from the forward cockpit and affords a convenient place for storing oars, anchors, and such odds and ends as will not be harmed by the small amount of water which, in every boat, collects in the bilge. Each seat also furnishes another dry, clean locker which can be used to good advantage. Never can there be too much locker space.

20 pages, 6 plate(s)

$9.95
Jazz Baby--12 Foot Multi-Purpose Boat (Pub. No. 5553)

"Jazz Baby" is an accomplished portable outboard runabout performing all its tasks well. Outstanding features of this multi-purpose boat are: easy rowing, trim design, ability to maneuver well with small outboard motors, portability, and surprisingly high speeds with motors of 6 to 15 hp. Built-in beveled chines make this boat unusually safe while a new type bottom assures satisfactory operation at low or high speeds.  Constructed of waterproof marine plywood, the hull is easy to build, light in weight, and permanently leakproof. The boat is seaworthy and stable. It is easily transported anywhere.

12 pages, 1 plate(s)

$7.95
Torpedo--A Fast 131/2 Foot Runabout (Pub. No. 5554)

Fast, safe and comfortable is the “Torpedo”—a distinctive runabout that skims over the water at race-boat speeds and carries four passengers in a capacious hull that will remain leakproof and light in weight during a lifetime of usage.  Marine plywood is used to cover the sides, bottom and deck, and besides dispensing with considerable labor in construction, the use of this material provides a boat that is strong and inexpensive to build and run. If the larger outboard motors from 10 hp. up are used, high speeds with economy of operation will result with lower fuel cost per mile due to the highly efficient planing action of the hull. This runabout, with speeds rivaling any racing hull, is not necessarily confined to such usage. Its commodious accommodations permit it to be used as a day cruising craft afloat, comparable to the auto ashore.

12 pages, 2 plate(s)

$7.95
Victory--A 12-14-16 Foot Runabout (Pub. No. 5555)

All requirements for an outboard runabout are met in the “Victory” sport runabout. Due to a new method of bottom design, the hull is fast, stable, handles well at all speeds with different sized motors, and has trim and attractive lines. Built of waterproof marine plywood, the construction is simplified and produces a lightweight, strong hull suitable for many uses. To meet every possible requirement of readers, the hull is designed so that it can be built in 12-, 14-, or 16-ft. lengths by making a few simple changes in these plans. This boat is a good project for winter work.

16 pages, 1 plate(s)

$8.95
Building Popular Flyer A Racing Hydroplane (Pub. No. 5556)

Speed is the outstanding feature of the  “Popular Flyer,” which was designed and built  along the same lines as the trophy-winning models. Every step in the construction of the boat is clearly shown so that you will have no difficulty in building a similar one. The craft may be built of cypress, mahogany or Washington red cedar.

16 pages, 3 plate(s)

$8.95
Building Rocket--A 15 Foot Inboard Hydroplane (Pub. No. 5557)

by William D. Jackson, N.A.

The “Rocket” is a boat designed for those who like their boats fast and sporty but still inexpensive to build and operate.  Any motor, with or without reverse gear, will power the “Rocket.” Auto motors that develop more than 35 horsepower, if of light weight, high speed design, will do nicely. Marine motors of similar high speed, light weight design will perform even better.

8 pages, 2 plate(s)

$7.95
Dragonfly--10 Foot Outboard Hydroplane (Pub. No. 5558)

"Dragonfly” is a hydroplane that is adapted to all classes of outboard motors from the 4 hp. rowboat motor to the largest racing engines. Streamlined in design, the constructional features are unique and present such developments as extended motor wells for quick planing action, and a combination of vee and convex bottom for safe and super-efficient high speed operation with low and high powered outboard motors.  Construction is simple. It calls for three transverse frames, and a plywood covered hull, offering a boat that is fast in operation, extremely strong, and light in weight. The removable motor board affords a means of adapting the hull to various motors while easily made plywood stabilizers provide safe turns at high speed.

12 pages, 1 plate(s)

$7.95
Porpoise--A Rough Water Outboard (Pub. No. 5559)

by Sam Rabl

LOA 15' 6", BEAM 5' 6", DRAUGHT 7"

If you are looking for a bang-up seagoing outboard boat that is inexpensive and easy to build—-one which will give you entire satisfaction-—then Porpoise is it! Born among a litter of balsa chips on a drafting board, Porpoise grew to a scale model that was later powered with a little Herkimer Bantam model-airplane motor. From that, she grew to a full-size lady who will take anything the Chesapeake Bay has to throw at her and will beat any other boat powered with an equal engine. The prime object in designing "Porpoise" was to get the most out of the money invested. Good oak is fairly expensive these days and even then one can never be entirely sure of its quality. I have watched the ordinary garden varieties of North Carolina Pine, which may be bought at any lumber yard, and have seen it hold up side-by-side with oak. Take this pine and treat it with Cuprinol and you are money in hand. With its use in mind, all the sizes of the boat were designed for stock one-by-twos and one-by-threes.

12 pages, 5 plate(s)

$8.95
Cruisette--A Cabin Outboard Runabout (Pub. No. 5565)

by William Jackson

The Cub Cruisette is a brand new design in outboard cabin craft. Its lines eresemble motor torpedo boats with new and attractive cabin accomodations which are especialy adapted to the needs of the outboard of rsmall boat entusiast. Besides utilzing outboard motors, this boat may also be powered with air cooled inboards or, if the construction is strengthened, small high power inboard engines may be used for high speeds, since the efficiency of this craft is alsmost constant with high or low power. Generous beam and ample depth provide all the room desired on this boat, and with an economical outboard of low power, you'll be able to go anywhere almost any time at a cost that is surprisingly low.

6 pages, 2 plate(s)

$6.95
Shore Lark--A Speedy 13 Foot Runabout (Pub. No. 5566)

Fast, safe, and seaworthy on almost any waters, this general utility runabout will afford long happy hours of sport and repay its construction many times. Adapted to the use of outboard motors from 1 to 24 hp., the utility runabout will plane safely, at speeds from 5 to 45 mph and easily carry four or five persons depending upon its power. Designed to elminate difficult joiner work, the “Shore Lark” is easy to build and presents a lightweight sturdy hull that one can build for a fraction of the amount he would have to pay for a finished boat of this type.

12 pages, 1 plate(s)

$7.95
Sea Bass (Pub. No. 5568)

by William F. Crosby

"Sea Bass" is a double-cabin power cruiser, 30 feet overall length, 9 feet beam and has a draft of 2 feet 3 inches. She is designed for a Kermath Sea Master, 6 -cylinder engine, although a similar engine with power between 25 and 50 hp. will be suitable.The headroom in Sea Bass runs from 5 feet to 5 feet 8 inches.

8 pages, 5 plate(s)

$7.95
Titan (Pub. No. 5575)

by Charles Bell

A Full Headroom, Light, “Convertible” Cruiser

Her dimensions are: 19’ 3” over-all length 8’ beam, 6’ 3” in the cabin 12” to 14” draft, depending upon how much built-ins are in the interior arrangement. Weight, including motor, is 2,200 lbs. Titan was designed for the man who wants the lightest and smallest, yet the biggest cruiser he can build that is practical for long hauls on a trailer, so that he can explore the large inland waters and coastal waters far from his ordinary haunts. She is not meant to cross oceans or to fight heavy seas and storms, yet she is a very stable, seaworthy boat if handled properly and if she has some ballast added to her bilges for rough water conditions. Trimmed as designed, she will plane easily and nose into shore like any outboarder because of the fact that she has the Universal motor “C” drive for power. The advantages of the “C” drive are obvious. The drive handles the same as an outboard as to kicking up over obstructions; it places the propeller in a direct line with the line of thrust—thus lessening vibration because all the blades work all the time, unlike a prop which is slanted down at 10 to 12 degrees from the line of thrust or forward motion. And the greatest advantage over the outboard is, of course, fuel economy and more real usable horsepower. Titan has enough flotation in her hull construction to remain afloat if swamped, and if the builder wants more protection he can add 12 cubic feet of Styrofoam—tucked away in her insides—which will give him over 2,200 pounds of positive flotation, not counting the wood in the boat. The large cockpit—six feet four by seven feet six—has enough room on each side of the motor box—in itself only 28” x 34”—to install two full-size pipe berths, so that when the convertible top is in place for the night the boat will sleep four people in comfort. There is room in the cabin for a large double berth forward with a W.C. under, galley sink and stove on one side and ice chest and food lockers on the other.

8 pages, 4 plate(s)

$7.95
Stormy Petrel--A 26 ft Trailerable Cuddy Cruiser (Pub. No. 5590)

by Sam Rabl

"Stormy Petrel" was designed for the man who has already built his first boat. The construction, while in no way complex, requires some knowledge of boatbuilding, and to that end some of the minor details which are usually shown in our other boats are omitted, and the builder may draw on his own experience to supply these.  "Stormy" was designed to take advantage of the light weight of marine plywood planking and thus gain in increased speed. Her hull was modeled to take any motor up to 100 h.p. She will accommodate six people on afternoon cruises and will sleep two comfortably. If the builder desires, the berths may be fitted with hinged backs and she will sleep four in the same manner as some of the small stock cruisers of her length. While designed for plywood planking she may also be planked with ordinary planking in either of the two methods which will be described later.

12 pages, 5 plate(s)

$8.95
Loon, a 16 ft Cruising Garvey (Pub. No. 5591)

by J. A. Emmett

"Loon" is an interesting combination of, old and the new—the garvey type has proven itself through long years on our inland rivers, and the shelter-cabin adds the modern touch. In addition, marine plywood is specified wherever possible in the construction to not only make for easier building but to give a lighter longer-lasting boat.  She will be found most useful in exploring interesting winding rivers with their connected ponds and small lakes, the small cabin permitting week-end sleeping and cooking aboard and making unnecessary the invenience of a riverbank camp. While not a fast type, the flat bottom with the spoon bow drives easily through the water with a motor of from 5 h.p. up.

12 pages, 3 plate(s)

$7.95
Amigo--A 23 ft Raised Deck Cruiser (Pub. No. 5610)

by John G. Hanna

Almost everyone knows nowadays that "amigo" is a Spanish word translated “friend” in the dictionaries. As used in an informal way by our Southern neighbors, however, it often carries the meaning of our “pal” or “chum.” It is in the latter sense I have applied the name to this design.. Its a simple, informal, friendly, dependable little boat in which Pa, Ma, and the kids,. or a bunch of young fellows, can put out for a week-end, or a longer vacation, of real fun and no worries. It distinctly isn’t the boat for the show-offs who want the fastest, and therefore necessarily the lightest possible, crate in which to go tearing about a crowded harbor at 17 miles (always described by the owner as 22½.) And it isn’t the most utterly simplified, angular box that can be knocked together in a hurry. Sailors in any port in the world will admire its truly thoroughbred lines. Yet it is by no means hard or expensive to build. In many ways that 30 years of boat building experience have taught me, I have taken most of the trouble and hard jobs out of the design. Actually, it should not cost more than $30 to $45 more material, and ten days more work, to build Amigo than the 24-foot Dorothy, simplified to the last possible limit, which I designed some years ago.  Knowing the- amateur boat building public as thoroughly as I do, I know right here a lot of you who have been admiring the boat -will turn pale and back up and gasp, “Oh, but it’s a round bilge hull, with steam bent frames—so terribly hard to build! I never could do it!” That is pure essence of bunk. There are (or were, pre-war) about 50,000 boat building shops in this country. I have visited a lot of them. In every case where the builder had experience with both types, he declared the round was much the easiest and quickest and therefore cheapest, to build. And 50,000 boat builders can’t be wrong about their own business!

16 pages, 3 plate(s)

$8.95
Seaward--A 30 ft. Power Cruiser (Pub. No. 5611)

by J.J. Fanta

Those who want a comfortable moderate-sized cruiser will want "Seaward". She’s a fast, seaworthy craft, with commodious quarters fulfilling family requirements. The cockpit aft is ideal for a sizable cruising party or deep sea fishing.  Seaward is 30 feet long, huskily built and capable of 15 miles an hour with a 90 horsepower engine turning a triple-bladèd propeller. Protection against wet weather is afforded by the trim cabin, equipped with an inside steering wheel. Headroom is ample for a six-footer throughout the cabin. Complete cruising facilities are housed in the cabin, including sleeping berths for four persons, galley, lavatory and considerable locker space. The engine is readily accessible, its cover being available as an extra table for general utility. A regular table fits forward of it.

14 pages, 6 plate(s)

$8.95
Torpedo--A 13 ft Super Runabout (Pub. No. 5612)

by William Jackson

"Torpedo" could almost be called a diminutive, peace-purposed PT boat, so unusual and outstanding are its appearance, design and performance. Indeed, in proportion to its size and weight it can outspeed and outmaneuver that most renowned of small combat craft to stem from World War II. Any outboard motor of from 10 to 30 h.p. may be used, and with the more powerful engines "Torpedo's" speed becomes breathtaking. Streamlining above water gives a sleek look and cuts down air resistance, while the non-tripping chines and molded bottom are adapted to plywood construction.

12 pages, 2 plate(s)

$7.95
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