Power Boat Plans

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High-Speed Runabout (Pub. No. 5749)

by Bruce N. Crandall

LOA 15' 2", BEAM 74 1/2", DRAFT 7", DISPLACEMENT 963 LBS.

Today’s outboards are big—tomorrow’s will be bigger. This plywood 15-footer is designed to handle the bigger ourboards.

Ths boat is a type of convex bottom developable-surface model that’s designed for ease of construction with sheet plywood and for the greatest possible speeds with large outboard motors consistent with comfort and the ability to drive from forward position. The bottom design is ideal for the amateur builder who wants a family runabout that is noticeably faster than the average factory-built boat of similar size and carrying capacity. The boat has been designed for average use in lakes, rivers and bays where the water is not too rough for high speeds. Water skiing, fishing, family joy riding and cruising are the principal uses for which it is designed. A convertible top is practical if the boat is to be used in comparatively protected waters. Safety at high speeds has in no way been sacrificed in this design as the convex V-bottom has ideal banking characteristics and the flared sides aft eliminate the possibility of chine tripping as well as conventional beveled chines do. However, the added high speed, particularly with a load, is not obtainable without some sacrifice in soft-riding characteristics, so if high-speed use is contemplated in relatively large open waters where a considerable chop is regularly encountered, a somewhat heavier and softer-riding design. As in any developable-surface design there is a very large choice of material which can be used for planking. For example, any type of ood planking can be used instead of plywood, and straight planks can be applied without any spiling if desired. Batten-seam type of construction would ordinarily be the best choice for use with regular wood planking.

8 pages, 4 plate(s)

$7.95
Family Vacation Cruiser (Pub. No. 5750)

by David D. Beach

LOA 24', BEAM 8'.

“LADY 0’ THE LAKE” is the latest of a growing list of inland water cruisers from this designer’s board and contains much in the way of those items which experience has shown to be desirable in a boat of this type.

This most reäent design is influenced much by what has been suggested in lengthy correspondence with river-cruising enthusiasts who were intrigued by Voyageur, the similarly sized craft which was featured in the 1958 edition of this annual. While the basic requirements or specifications for Lady o’ the Lake are the same as for Voyageur, the present design is, it is thought, somewhat less complicated to build and a bit more suited to small-family cruising. Of course, there are some features in Lady o’ the Lake which might be the subject of some discussion, but since all designs of this type are in the nature of compromises, it is felt that what has resulted will appeal to the greater percentage of families seeking a craft for the larger lakes and inland bodies of water. Not that this boat is unsuitable for certain coastal waters, as the waterways along the East Coast and Gulf are entirely suitable for the present design, but the main considerations are for the requirements of lake, river and canal cruising. Looking at the outboard profile view, it is first noted that the three large windows make the craft one where visibility will be extremely good. As the window are all fitted with sliding panels, there will be no dearth of ventilation and pleasant breezes. The forward end of the craft is a fairly adequate cockpit set as low as possible to still be self—bailing in rainy weather. The after deck, at the sheer level, is fitted with hatches for ice and fuel. The railing around the after end of the cabin top is purposely fitted some distance behind the front edge of the cabin in order to tend to reduce the number of passengers who will want to lounge there. The profile appearance is somewhat improved by holding the topside railing from being placed too far forward. The single motor shown is mounted on an outboard bracket.

10 pages, 5 plate(s)

$7.95
13-Ft High-Speed Outboard Runabout (Pub. No. 5755)

by Bruce N. Crandall

LOA 13', BEAM 71 1/2", DRAFT 7", DISPLACEMENT 780 LBS.

This is an ideal design for the amateur builder who wants a modern family runabout at the lowest possible cost.

Here is about the smallest outboard runabout suitable for family use on our waterways today. It is a convex-V bottom developable-surface model designed for ease and economy of construction with sheet plywood and for highest speed consistent with comfort and the ability to drive from a forward position. The boat is large enough for average use on small lakes, rivers and bays where the water does not get too rough for high speeds. Water skiing, fishing and family fun riding are the principal uses for which it is designed. As the beam is much greater than on the average 13-footer, the boat can carry up to four adults safely if the water is not too rough. Safety at high speeds has in no way been sacrificed for top speed as the convex-V bottom has ideal banking characteristics and the flared sides aft eliminate the possibility of chine tripping just as well as conventional beveled chines do. A convex-V bottom hull of this size will plane at from 16 to 18 mph but attains its best efficiency at 23 mph and over, so for average use a motor of from 25 hp to 40 hp is recommended.

12 pages, 4 plate(s)

$7.95
How to Build Channel Cat (Pub. No. 5756)

by David D. Beach

LOA 24'

Like to relax when you’re on the water and doyour cruising at a leisurely pace? Then this catamaran is for you.

The inland lakes and rivers have, in recent years, been dotted with a wide variety of pontoon craft. Some are built of oil drums, some with planking, some of plywood, and some of long lengths of welded, thin-shelled, large-diameter pipe. They are fitted with all sorts of canopies, shelters and cabins, with all sorts of conveniences or lack thereof. Some are carefully thought out and well built, but some are very crude. Taking their cue from the trends developing in the inland waters, Evinrude Motors developed and exhibited at the 1959—Motor Boat Show a novel appreach to the housefloat idea. Built as a show model, the craft revealed many ideas which excited a considerable amount of interest in the minds of the boating public. It stimulated the planning of the boat shown in the drawings accompanying this text which was designed to provide a craft most suitable to many uses on the rivers and sheltered waterways of the country. It is not a seagoing vessel, nor is it suitable for high speed. It is a craft for leisurely exploration and cruising, for day use by modest groups, and yet is capable of being used by two couples for extended week-end (or longer) cruises.

15 pages, 6 plate(s)

$8.95
20-Ft. Cabin Runabout (Pub. No. 5757)

by Edson I. Schock

LOA 20', 8' 3", DRAFT 1' 10", DISPLACEMENT 2,270 LBS.

Fishermen will be most interested in this design. She has an open cockpit, but enough cabin to be snug in bad weather.

For the yachtsman who wants a small “Sport Fisherman” type of boat this could be a suitable hull. She has good speed, beam enough for safety, a place to get in out of the weather in a rain squall, a shelter for the skipper in cold weather, and she is a good sea boat. The little cabin is not meant for cruising, but if you are some distance from your home port and a bad sea kicks up, you can spend the night on the boat and avoid a run home when it would be unwise for such a small boat to go out. She should make a good utility launch or fishing boat. This boat cannot be plywood planked. She should be planked in the conventional style with 4” planks, or in the Maine—lobster-boat style with narrow strips. The strip planking is the easiest for the amateur, and the cheapest.

20 pages, 5 plate(s)

$9.95
How to Build Solari (Pub. No. 5760)

by David D. Beach

LOA 20', BEAM 8'

The 20-footer described here, is the fifth of a series which extends back just about five years.

These five boats, which can all be said to be part of a family of continually evolving craft, were an effort to provide a boat suitable for a large portion of the boating public. Small differences in hull form were made to refine the running bottom—which is a good one—but the evolutionary changes were primarily in the topside arrangement. The reasons for the present design are of interest, for they represent a considerable amount of solid thought on the matters of small boating as engaged in by a high percentage of people who own boats of this size. The designer’s personal philosophy regarding small boating is also represented here, because that too has evolved as a result of pressures from custom-design clients who were desirous of having special craft for their own specific reasons. The reasons for these special craft are often very good, and in many instances they represent solid thinking as to the shortcomings of the presently available craft.

8 pages, 7 plate(s)

$7.95
9-Ft. Outboard Speedster (Pub. No. 5762)

by Bruce N. Crandall

LOA 9' 41/2", BEAM 56 1/2", DRAFT 5 1/4", DISPLACEMENT 350 LBS.

A safe miniature runabout for highest possible speeds with small outboard motors. This is a boat which will set the pace for youngest sportsmen.

I designed this speedster with the express idea of creating a boat both fast and extremely safe for use by the younger generation on our waterways of today. The type of bottom design is not new but is adapted from those used in a series of similar designs and on outboard racing runabouts of my design which have in the past established many world records. Though the bottom design (the running surface, that is) is not new, there are other aspects of the design which are quite different from previous boats of this type. The beam of the running surface is 3’ 2” and the over-all beam of the boat is 4’ 8½” or just over half the overall length. The beam in itself is a safety factor, but most important is the nontrip effect of the bevel chines in combination with the flared sides, which allows the safest possible high-speed turns. The sides are also high enough so that the driver can sit comfortably at the steering wheel, behind a windshield if desired. The hull has been designed on developable surfaces so that marine plywood can be used to make the construction practical and easy for home boatbuilders.

15 pages, 4 plate(s)

$8.95
21-Ft. Outboard Cruiser (Pub. No. 5765)

by Bruce N. Crandall

LOA 21' 1", BEAM 7' 10 1/2', DRAFT 15 1/2", DISPLACEMENT 4560 LBS.

An all-purpose plywood cruiser, designed for easy trailering and for all kinds of waterways.

This cruiser is a convex-V bottom, developable-surface type of craft best suited for carrying heavy loads at planing or semiplaning speeds. It is designed for amateur construction with sheet plywood planking. The plans are arranged for the easiest construction by the amateur builder consistent with strength and light weight. This is about as large a boat as is usually considered practical for trailering on the highways and launching with an ordinary car. The beam is the maximum allowed on the highways in most areas and anything longer or inboard powered would be too heavy for easy launching and loading. An outboard cruiser of this type opens up unlimited cruising opportunities, for it can be trailered to different waterways each trip. The hull has been designed for use on large bodies of water, even the open ocean, and because outboard power is practical for shallow water, this boat can be used on rivers, bays and lakes of all sorts. The arrangement has been worked out to give maximum space and convenience while living aboard. As the Arrangement Plan shows, there is room for two bunks in the cabin, as well as galley and enclosed toilet. The headroom is about 5’ 1” in most of the cabin and 5’ 4” under the hatch, much more of course when the hatch is open. If the enclosed toilet arrangement is not used and the toilet is installed instead under a seat or short bunk, there will be much more usable room in the cabin. The bunks shown in the cabin are 6’ long measured fore and aft of the boat, but their longest dimension is over 6’ 4”. If longer bunks are needed some space will have to be taken away from the galley and toilet space. The aft seat in the cockpit is 5½’ wide and could serve as a bunk, or longitudinal bunks could be installed in the cockpit if desired.     The type of bottom design selected for this hull is not new and has proved itself highly seaworthy in many similar types of boats. It was chosen largely because it makes a very efficient load carrier at the speeds at which a cruiser of this type is generally used.

15 pages, 6 plate(s)

$8.95
How to Build Sunfisher (Pub. No. 5766)

by David D. Beach

LOA 19' 11/2", BEAM 92"

Designed primarily for an outboard, this fast open fishing boat can be adapted to inboard power. Special attention has been given to help the one-man builder

This design is based on an idea I which developed out of a discussion with a builder of small boats on the Florida east coast. Its characteristics are those of a trailerable craft which can be used by small groups for fishing and general utility, including day cruising, camp cruising and some water skiing. The boat is simple to construct, but huskily built, and within the capabilities of the home builder who works by himself. Further, it should be primarily for outboard motors, but the advent of steady acceptance of the inboard/outboard drive requires that provision be made for that type of propulsion. The discussion of how small boats are used in different parts of the country, for different purposes, brought out several other characteristics which should be included. These were that some provision should be made for fitting a water closet out of direct view of the passengers, that some fixed berth or lounge area be provided, and that there be some convertible shelter which can be stowed and easily erected. Simple sketches indicated the possible means whereby these features might be combined into one craft, and over some months of not too-continuous contemplation about them, Sunflsher, as this design has been named, evolved. The final form is considered to be applicable to a wide variety of boating, fishing and cruising activities. To meet with the approval of as many builders as possible, several alternatives have been illustrated. The outboard-motor version has been dimensioned for a pair of inline motors and there is structure adequate to carry a pair of the 60 hp models. A proper propulsion setup would be a pair of 25 to 40 hp motors which would seem, to the designer, to provide adequate performance with a substantial cruising range on the fuel carried. Of course, the larger engines can be fitted and the craft will go faster, but not for long, as the fuel consumption will be high. Should the builder desire to fit only one motor the transom cutout dimensiom should be determined to suit thc particular motor chosen. The inboard version shows the Volvo-Penta motor of 80 hp and the outboard drive with which that motor is fitted. This is a highly efficient propulsion system and should drive the craft at nearly 30 mph with a wide range of loads. There are other power plant possibilities, including lie Universal Motors Vee-drive Atomic 4, the Swinhardt out-drive with any inboard motor up to 80 hp or the conventional power plant with a Walters transfer drive. All of these will make proper installations.

9 pages, 8 plate(s)

$8.95
18-Ft. Bass Boat (Pub. No. 5768)

by Edson I. Schock

LOA 18', BEAM 7', DRAFT 1' 10", DISPLACEMENT 2270 LBS.

Here is a launch that will make a good all-round utility boat as well as an able fishing craft. She requires some skill to build, but her popularity in rugged New England proves her reliability

This type of boat has certain characteristics which make it suitable for fishing among rocks, close to shore. It must be a good sea boat, capable of operating in reasonably rough water; it must have a fair amount of speed, without necessarily being a racing machine; it must have good acceleration so that it can jump clear of rocks if an unexpected wave tries to wash it ashore; it must maneuver well, being quick to answer the rudder; and it must have a cockpit from which to fish comfortably. In general these are desirable characteristics of any small launch, so this boat would make a good family runabout as well as a good fishing boat. The home boatbuilder should have some skill and experience with small-boat construction before undertaking the building of a boat such as this. She has steam bent frames, and the planking will require careful fitting. The construction is entirely conventional, and should present no difficulties.

14 pages, 5 plate(s)

$8.95
Fast Hydroplane for Small Motors (Pub. No. 5769)

by Bruce N. Crandall

LOA 8' 1", BEAM 42", DISPLACEMENT 90 LBS.

If you (or your boy) have a yen for speed,but are faced with a small-outboard budget, this inexpensive  and easily built boat may be just your ticket

Here’s an easy-to-build, inexpensive little boat that utilizes the simplest and most efficient type of hydroplane bottom. While an experienced driver can use more horsepower, it is especially designed for the young driver who wants to get the greatest speed possible from the small and inexpensive 5 to 7-hp outboard motors. Standard types of racing hydroplanes cannot be expected to give the best speed and efficiency with these small motors, because they are designed for much higher speeds, with racing motors of much greater power.     The planing surface of this design is a simple flat plane that is absolutely straight fore and aft and from side to side. No attempt has been made toward soft riding, as speed and safety are the only considerations. The dimensions of the planing surface have been calculated for best efficiency with a driver weighing 100 to 150 pounds and at speeds from 20 to 24 mph. Nontrip chines for safety on turns have been incorporated in the simplest manner, and the whole hull is designed for easiest possible construction. The construction is so simple, in fact, that all dimensions are given directly on the frame drawings, and no Table of Offsets, lofting (laying down the lines)are necessary. A boy can build ithimself, and in a small corner of the shop.

8 pages, 2 plate(s)

$7.95
How to Build Picadilli (Pub. No. 5770)

by David D. Beach

LOA 20' 3", BEAM 93"

This 20’ jet-inboard day cruiser will provide plenty of room for that afternoon on the water, as well as speed to spare for water skiers

For a long time, my mail has brought requests for a boat design suitable for the new marine jet pumps. These letters arrive in sufficient numbers to indicate that there is substantial interest in this type of propulsion. The writers are fairly well distributed throughout this country, and once in a while a query will come from overseas. It was, then, with an established basis of need that this design was submitted to the editors of the Boatbuilding Annual. The drawings that accompany the text should excite considerable enthusiasm. For those who are not overly familiar with marine jet systems, a few words may be in order to describe them. Essentially, a marine jet is another reaction device that operates in strict accordance with old Apple-on-the-Head Newton’s laws of motion. He said (and please pardon my paraphrasing his more formal exposition) that if you suck some water into the bottom of a boat and squirt it out the back faster than it came in, it’ll produce some push on the boat in the direction opposite the squirt. We need not get involved in more classical terms like time rate of change of momentum and reaction quantum, or stuff like that, to appreciate the jet. The jet has no external protuberances below the hull, so it’s wonderful for a water-ski boat, as the danger of propellers is eliminated. Because there are no propellers, struts, shafts or rudders to become damaged, it can operate in very shoal waters. You can make fullpower stops with the jet, because you don’t have to cut the engine speed to reverse the thrust. The jet is here to stay, and it will continue to increase in popularity as the boating public becomes aware of the plus factors and learns how to minimize the minuses. But we should get on with the discussion of the boat. Now, the craft is primarily a big runabout and day cruiser, because it will provide enough space to permit a party to spend an afternoon afloat without crowding. In profile, its straight sheer and moderately raking stem and transom provide a pleasant hull for a short cabin over the main seating. The cabin is a straightforward thing of simple lines and shape, with a flat windshield and a small overhang at the back end. It does, however, have a sunroof opening that permits the passengers to enjoy the sky and sun without exposure to wind and spray. The top is of automotive sport topping and can be fitted or removed quite easily and rapidly. The deckplan view shows that the sun-roof opening is substantial. The seating arrangement is for six people—a helmsman, a couple opposite and three in the wide seat forward of the engine box. The engine box has a folding top panel and double cushion that extend to form a very adequate area for sunning or relaxation, underway or at anchor. The area behind the engine box is adequate for a pair of folding chairs or even a single fishing chair. Let’s now look at the inboard plan and profile, which supplement the first drawing to show the features of the boat. Here the seating and sunning arrangement is better shown, as the top isn’t indicated to obstruct the view. Incidentally, some builders might not care to put a shelter on Piccadilli, and that’s perfectly okay. A wraparound windshield and a folding canvas top would fit fine, and the builder who wants the complete runabout treatment can get it in just that manner. The Profile view shows the seat arrangement with plenty of leg room, the stowage bins under the side deck, the anchor and fender stowage under the foredeck and the general schemes for sheathing the interior of the craft.

10 pages, 5 plate(s)

$7.95
15-Ft. High-Speed Outboard Utility (Pub. No. 5771)

by Bruce N. Crandall

LOA 15' 1", BEAM 76",DRAFT 9", DISPLACEMENT 1266 LBS.

Sheet plywood can more than hold its own when it comes to a design offering both speed and load carrying ability.

Here is a new design that offers a remarkable combination of speed with soft riding and load-carrying ability. It is a convex-V-bottom, developable-surface, high-speed type designed for planing speeds in rough or choppy waters. Large nontrip chines, extra beam and flare and good banking and handling characteristics make it exceptionally safe for its size. This boat features a somewhat new type of soft-riding, high-speed bottom design, which was developed as a result of a certain amount of experimentation and model testing. As compared with my previous, semiround, high-speed bottom designs, it represents an attempt to increase the boat’s efficiency as much as possible with a heavy load, and also at low planing speeds, without affecting its efficiency at higher planing speeds or interfering with the soft—riding or handling characteristics. The performance of the test boat was very gratifying, as it tended to uphold all of my theoretical decisions. The water breaks completely clear at the bevel chine at all normal planing speeds and does not even touch the spray rails except in rough water or with a heavy load. The surfaces formed by the bevel-chine planks add extra buoyancy and stability in displacement condition and extra planing surface for quick planing even with a load; after planing speed is reached, they ride entirely clear and cause no drag. The test boat was run all summer with a 65-hp motor, which I considered to be about average, in power and weight, of the motors with which the design will be used. It was tested under all loads and many water conditions and was run at full speed through all kinds of wakes, to see if any possible flaws could be found in the design. The results were so satisfactory that I intend using the same basic bottom lines for several new plans in the future.

18 pages, 4 plate(s)

$8.95
How to Build Sea-Star (Pub. No. 5773)

by Rogers Winter

LOA 24', BEAM 8', DRAFT 3', DISPLACEMENT 500 LBS.

Water skiers and speed demons, look away. However, if you’re interested in space, operating economy and sea-kindliness in a 24’ day cruiser, here’s one.

There is a class of salt-water sailors who don’t care a hang for spit and polish; who value comfort, safety and economy over speed; who wear dungarees frayed at the cuffs; who bang out the hours on the botom of a dishpan and who have a wife and four kids who love sailing about as much as the captain of the ship. These sailors are water gypsies—and there must be a lot of them, to judge from the inquiries a designer gets for a boat to meet their specifications. They want a boat with an easy motion, 6’ of headroom in the cabin and under the standing top, berths wide enough and long enough furnish reasonable sleeping comfort, ample foot room on the cabin sole, a cockpit large enough for four people on day trips, a decent galley, ample toilet room and side decks wide enough to let them go forward with some hope of arriving. Above all, they want a boat thats simple and easy to construct—though experience indicates that no boat is “simple to build.” Such a boat is hard to design—epecially when you try to do it in only 24’ overall. After considerable search and thinking, however, this signer has developed Sea Star. Sea Star is quite a boat. She has 6' 1" of standing room under the pilothouse roof, 5’5” of headroom in the cabin, two full-size bunks, plenty of galley space and a sizable toilet room (fully enclosed), and her construcon is cross-planked, Chesapeake Bay—skipjack style—one that most nearly meets the requirement “simple to build.” She is no speed demon. Maximum designed speed is 8½ to 9 mph, with fuel consumption on the order of 1½ gallons per hour at cruising speed, which makes her a wonderfully economical boat to operate. She also goes along without dragging in a heavy sea; rolls and pitches moderately, with an easy motion, and does not pound. She behaves more like a Rolls-Royce than a Tin Lizzie. And you can forget about the spine-jarring pounding you get from the average runabout; with Sea Star you don’t need a chiropractor to get the kinks out of your back after an afternoon on the water.
As he looks over the plans, two questions will immediately come to the mind of a prospective builder: 1) Can plywood be used? 2) What about more power for more speed? The answer to the first is yes. Instead of the 1” side planking specified, 5/8" plywood can be used, in which case the intermediate frames are omitted and a 1¼”x2½” stringer is run fore and aft, halfway between chine and sheer, and let into the main frames. The bottom is better cross-planked as specified. The answer to the second question is no. Adding extra power to a boat of this type is a pure waste of money. She will go just so fast and no faster, so 25 hp is ample for the purpose.

12 pages, 6 plate(s)

$8.95
How to Build Paramour (Pub. No. 5776)

by David D. Beach

LOA 22', BEAM 8' 6"

Got a couple of seagoing kids and a wife who likes creature comforts on those weekend jaunts? Here’s a 22’ inboard cruiser that has a lot to recommend it in the way of creative design and unusual features

The design shown in the accompanying drawings had its beginnings several years ago when there was a 16-footer called Sea-Deuce. That was a little cruiser either for outboard power or for one of the smaller inboard-outboard engines. The boat was extremely popular, as evidenced by the amount of correspondence it provoked, and many builders enlarged it a frame space to provide a bit more cockpit room. The design, as it seemed to develop, had several main features. First, if the boat were longer, it would probably be used with more people aboard. This would require space to seat them and space for them to move about in. If the extra passengers were children, it would require a special area for them in which they could be seen and watched. A small family would probably want to cruise; or the owner and his wife might invite another couple as cruising companions. These extra people would need sleeping facilities. Of course, an enclosed head, or watercloset, space would be a must, and if a little galley could be fitted—well, fine. How about power? The designer considered this at some length and then decided on a true inboard installation. However, because of the weight and center-of-gravity considerations, as well as the desire for a flat shaft angle, the decision was made to incorporate a V-drive marine engine of about 100 hp. It was felt that the prospective builder who would be attracted to this project would be interested in good performance, but would not demand an extreme speed. It takes quite a bit of power to produce high speeds in a 22-footer—and power has both initial high cost and high operating (fuel) cost. Of course, there are exceptions; but the designer may have something for them in 1966. The basic profile of Sea-Deuce shows a high-freeboard, straightsheer hull with a modestly raked stem. The cabin trunk is low and rather short, and amidship there is a fitted windshield with long side wings for wind and weather protection.

12 pages, 5 plate(s)

$8.95
Ann Louise (Pub. No. 5793)

by Don Rodney

LOA 18' 11/2", BEAM 7' 31/2, DRAFT 0' 103/4"

A three-berth outboard cruiser for family cruising.

The oft-repeated phrase, “Two is company, three is a crowd,” certainly applies nowhere better than when an attempt is made to sleep three or more persons on an outboard cruiser with the customary two, fore-and-aft arranged, bunks. Of course, a third person can bed himself down on some life-preserver cushions and a blanket in the gangway between the two berths or in the cockpit, but such an arrangement is definitely third-rate, about like trying to ride three on a bicycle built for two. Now, if sleeping is bad under the above-mentioned conditions, the locker situation is even worse for, even under the best of conditions, the amount of locker space available on the average outboard cruiser is on the meager side indeed. It was with the thought of providing a cruiser with an extra berth for that third member, as well as to see what could be done to improve the locker situation, that we have designed Ann Louise. In providing the extra berth, we have been able to produce an elevated platform on which a seat for the helmsman may be mounted. In this design we have tried to incorporate all of the good features on the two-bunk boat as well as to profit by a few past mistakes and a lot of cruising experience which would indicate that besides an extra berth, an enlarged galley, extra drawer and locker space, andan enclosed head woul be highly desirable.

12 pages, 4 plate(s)

$7.95
Build Kingfisher--A Twenty-foot Motor Sailer (Pub. No. 5794)

by S. S. Rabl

Many small, light-weight marine engines are appearing on the market today for use in small runabouts, cruisers and auxiliaries. Speed is only secured by light displacement, and for a speedy small cruiser the hull has to be lightly built. Many of us have wished for a small cruiser that would accommodate “us” and the missus for a week-end cruise or short over-night fishing trip, and that could be carried on a trailer for a longer vacation. I have had these thoughts also, and have designed just this sort of boat in Kingfisher. There is a large, roomy, and best of all “sheltered,” cockpit aft in which we can loll or fish. Below are two full length bunks with enough room to get a good night’s sleep, and up in the “eyes” of her is the “Johnnie.” A hinged hatch over this apparatus gives efficient ventilation and also allows handling of forward lines and the mooring rope when it is necessary to dock or moor her. An ice box in the cockpit will keep all the grub necessary for a short trip, and a small canned heat stove and dish rack can be mounted on the aft cabin bulkhead.

12 pages, 2 plate(s)

$7.95
How to Build Sea Deuce (Pub. No. 5796)

by David D. Beach

Stylish 16’ cruiser accommodates two comfortably on a weekend boating trip. Unique interior provides space for good-sized double berth and regulation utilities
.

This attractively styled little craft was designed as an effort to provide a small cruiser of near-minimum dimensions thta would be suitable for weekend use by a congenial couple. The initial correspondence between the editor and the designer recommended that, if possible, the boat should be designed to accommodate either a pair of outboard motors of not over 40 hp each or one of the new inboard-outboard drive combinations having the same maximum horsepower. The initial sketches for the boat showed a conventional profile of some distinctiveness but with an unconventional arrangement. Optional construction details were also indicated, and these were accepted as the basis for the seven design drawings that accompany this article. These drawings show the alternate construction details.

10 pages, 7 plate(s)

$8.95
15 Ft. Outboard Runabout (Pub. No. 5798)

by Bruce N. Crandall

Semiround-bottom design tends to bank this speedster into large oncoming waves not met head-on. So for long trips at high speeds with minimum pounding I suggest you try this.

This is an extra-deep and extra-beamy, semiround-bottom model designed for as safe and smooth a ride as possible at high speed in rough or choppy water. Because the outboard motors of today are both more powerful and more dependable than their predecessors, most outboarders are taking longer trips at higher speeds than ever before. As larger waters are tackled, the persistent problem of riding heavy chops at planing speeds becomes more and more important. Even our most protected waterways become rough from boat wakes alone. It is, of course, not possible to eliminate completely pounding from any planing boat, but many of my previous semiround-bottom, developable-surface designs have proved that they can give a smooth ride at high planing speeds into a considerable chop. With the aid of the experiences I have had with these previous boats, I designed this one to do it even better. It has a deeper round than the previous models, carried all the way aft, so that there is no flat surface to receive a solid shock. To go along with the soft-riding bottom there is extra beam, large, beveled chines, larger spray rails, somewhat deeper keel, and considerable flare carried all the way aft. The soft riding is accomplished without the aid of a deep, sharp forefoot which can smooth out small waves but is a dangerous thing at best in a high- speed planing boat because it will act as an uncontrolled bow rudder and jerk the boat in exactly the wrong direction on meeting oncoming waves. The type of bottom used on this boat will instead tend to bank into any large oncoming wave not met exactly head-on; this is a safety factor, improving steering in rough going.

18 pages, 4 plate(s)

$8.95
20 Ft. Steamer Launch (Pub. No. 5799)

by David D. Beach

If you don't give a hang for speed and have a yen for things nostalgic, this trim little puffer can be the light of your life--and the envy of all who see her.

Some years ago I had an opportunity to see a small restored steam launch, and the memory of all the atmosphere of that boat has persisted since that time. I can still visualize the carefully polished brass trim on the boat, boiler and engine, and hear the gentle whosh-whosh as the engine turned over. The exciting smells of steam and warm oil and the crackle of kindling are as strong in my memory as if it happened this afternoon. When I became aware of the fact that there existed in 1961 a firm whose present reputation was established with a line of small coal or wood fired boilers, and who also made the engines which had so impressed me, it seemed natural that a launch of that type would be appropriate. The original sketches varied only slightly from the working drawings shown in this article, and all the flavor of the old-style craft has been carefully duplicated. The features which have been included in the design of "Nostalgia" have been deliberately provided to furnish an air of the antique, but have been thought out so as to be practical and contemporary. Imagine the eagerness of the younger members of the boating party when they’re asked if they’d like to come along and get steam up! Nothing so unglamorous as merely turning on the blower switch and then the starter switch. First the kindling must be properly laid on the boiler grate. When it is ignited and a good crackling fire is burning, then the coal can be shoveled in. Finally, but in a matter of minutes, the steam pressure has risen to the operating range. A pull of the whistle cord and everybody within earshot knows that the “steam is up!” When your other guests come aboard and are comfortable, the lunch has been stowed and everything made shipshape and Bristol-fashion, the boat can be cast off! Really, there is nothing as exhilarating as getting underway in a steam-powered craft. The proper valves are opened with the hiss of steam into the lines, and the reverse gear is thrown into the “ahead position.” The throttle is then cracked, and almost imperceptibly the engine cranks begin to move, and you’re underway! This is silent, without fuss and confusion. The gentle slap of the water under the bow, the soft sound of escaping steam and the subdued crackle of the fire in the firebox all add up to a boating sensation that is literally not to be equalled.

12 pages, 5 plate(s)

$8.95
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