Power Boat Plans

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21 Ft. Fishing Launch (Pub. No. 5800)

by Edson I. Schock

This sturdy, unadorned launch will power you and your fishing partner through the roughest water you care to explore.

She's a big boat for her length, being both deep and wide, providing ample room for all your gear. This is a very simple boat, without frills, “selling points,” advertising features or “styling.” She is a big boat for her length, being both deep and wide. She should be a good seaboat. The construction of a boat of this size should not be attempted by anyone who has not had some experience in boatbuilding. She will be easy to build, but there is a lot of work in a 21-footer and the novice might well be discouraged before the work was completed.

16 pages, 4 plate(s)

$8.95
River Cruiser (Pub. No. 5806)

by Edson I. Schock

For leisurely eruising in calm water or gunkholing on that placid lake, here’s an 18-footer that spells pleasure for the builder as well as the sportsman

This little boat is intended for short cruises on rivers or well-protected lakes. She may be carried on a trailer. She is not recommended for open water. She would be very uncomfortable in rough water. In the cabin she has one single and one double berth, the double converting for daytime use to a dinette. There are a small toilet room, galley and sink, locker, icebox, stove. The stove shown is a Mariner alcohol two-burner, made by Homestrand, Larchmont, N.Y. There is a hanging space between dinette and toilet for shore clothes. The headroom is 5’, kept low for exterior appearance. Steering is from the forward cockpit seat, as shown, or from aft if you prefer. The wheel could be mounted on the after end of the cabin, and by standing on a grating a little above the deck you could see over the house.

9 pages, 4 plate(s)

$7.95
How to Build Morgiana (Pub. No. 5807)

by David D. Beach

Boat designer=eclectic—i.e., one who selects the best of many good ideas and makes them work, in something unique.

The boatbuilding business, and especially the designing of boats for that industry, is full of thieves! Every designer steals ideas from other boats he sees in the publications he reads or at the shows he attends. Of course, a lot of ideas are worth using, and they can all be improved on. The 20-footer shown on the drawings that accompany this text is full of design ideas. None of them are really new, but none of them are so old that they’ve become commonplace. Some are presently in existence, some have appeared in little custom designs and some have been lifted out of other amateur-construction articles. However, what makes this boat different is that, to the best of this designer’s knowledge, the ideas have never been collected in quite this way before. Which brings us to the reason for the name. If you remember your Arabian Nights, you’ll recall the girl who disposed of the 40 thieves for Ali Baba and helped protect his secret. I rather doubt that I’ll need protection from those boatbuilders and designers whose ideas I’ve incorporated in this design, but just in case, I’ll name the boat after that girl. So: Morgiana! Now that the design is identified, we can discuss her features and how to build her. First, let us look at the Outboard Plan and Profile. The distinctive feature of Morgiana is her novel windshield profile. This is vee’d forward and has long side wings to provide a really adequate amount of protection from wind and rain. Spray from her bow wave will not be a problem, as she has been given substantial freeboard. The windshield side wings lap on the cockpit coaming, which runs all the way aft, standing proud of the deck a full 4”. The plan view shows there is a large cockpit, with a pair of seats for the helmsman and his companion, well sheltered. Some of the little “goodies” indicated on the arrangement will be discussed as we go on.

8 pages, 4 plate(s)

$7.95
Herculette--A Mini Tug (Pub. No. 5808)

by David D. Beach

Chrome lovers and speedsters, steer clear of this jaunty craft. But if you’re after a good, honest boat with character—welcome aboard
.

Everybody has seen big, massive harbor and ocean tugs. These craft storm along with curling bow waves and an air of complete confidence to move anything afloat. Many of us have thought how much we’d like to stand in the wheelhouse of such a vessel and be the master of an honest working boat. There is always something strangely attractive about these unglamorous work craft. A strong fascination with them lies under the surface of many a yachtsman who is not overly happy with high speed, high maintenance, high operating costs and high entertainment expenses. It is to this group (and to others who wish to ally themselves with the rebels against chrome and plastic) that Herculette is offered. Herculette is a lady, some distant relative of those big ocean-going salvage vessels always named Ajax or Hercules. Although she is a bit less huge, she does bear the family resemblance. Her sprightly sheer, raised wheelhouse and short stack all combine to show her unmistakable ancestry. Herculette is several levels above the type of design normally considered by the home builder. She is not, however, an impossible craft to build. Like many other objectives feminine, she is not to be undertaken without serious consideration of all her features. Although only a 25-footer, she requires some previous boatbuilding experience. Also, because of the wealth of construction details that are drawn on these plans (but not completely specified by detailed description), some standard reference must be alluded to. It should be stated that although the drawings are complete for the properly experienced boatbuilder, one who undertakes this design with little prior experience in heavy small boats would be well advised to have other standard texts readily available for supplemental information. First let us discuss the boat’s outstanding physical characteristics. We’ll start with the Outboard Profile, as external appearance is one of her main attractions. It was considered most important that the “little-tugboat look” be incorporated into her design. Note that the sheer is ample and that there is a rounded counter stern with a tumble-home bulwark, properly scuppered. The wheelhouse has all-around visibility well provided for, and the main cabin sides have rectangular sliding windows to permit excellent visibility and air movement. The short stack, set at the wheelhouse end, is pleasingly proportioned, and in keeping with her character, a mast is set af t— complete with a short gaff and proper lights. A character touch is the provision for the old traditional fire buckets, installed in a suitable frame on either side of the cabin top. Maybe they should be fitted a bit farther aft than as shown for styling balance. Inboard, her spaces can best be seen on the Arrangement Drawing. In the forepeak, aft of the line-stowage grating, are the marine toilet and minimum lavatory. This space, under the raised deck, has headroom in the trunk, which is fitted with a hinged top, and in the area under the chart table of the wheelhouse. There is space for a small hanging locker and for a cabinet for miscellaneous stowage beneath the lavatory counter. The wheelhouse is minimum, but adequate, with three windows forward. The center-line window should open on adjusters, while the side ones are best installed as fixed panels. To port and starboard are aft sliding doors that provide for egress to the side decks. In the wheelhouse is a wide seat, for three adults, and access to the engine space is through a pair of hatches in the wheelhouse deck. The wheelhouse has a wide chart table over the toilet space below forward, and the standard instrument panel of the engine manufacturer is to be mounted therein. Of course, a tug should have a large wheel, and a 24”-diameter spoked wheel is fitted to the Steermaster rudder control. Going aft down the companionway to port (watch your head!) brings you into the after cabin. A galley is tucked under the wheelhouse seat and to starboard. The galley is complete with sink, ice chest and two—burner stove in a metal-lined alcove with an exhaust fan.

11 pages, 5 plate(s)

$7.95
17 Ft. High-Speed Outboard (Pub. No. 5809)

by Bruce N. Crandall

Your teeth don’t rattle and your bones don’t jar when you throttle up this multipurpose speedster with a soft-riding bottom.

This is an extra-large, beamy 17’ outboard boat designed for high-speed use with large motors and heavy loads on many kinds of waterways. It is called a convertible, because it is big and stable enough for all-weather use with a convertible top and because it is suitable for many varying uses. It will serve well as a runabout, a camping cruiser or an offshore fishing boat. This is an ideal boat for weekend fishing trips or cruises, especially when transportation by trailer is necessary. It is a fine-size family boat, is large and steady enough to swim and dive from and will pull water skiers well with 40 hp or more. The arrangement is such that the weight is carried sufficiently far aft to make the hull ride high enough to be safe and dry, yet passengers can ride forward behind the protection of the windshield. Although the position of the forward seats should not be changed from the location shown on the plans, the after part of the cockpit can be arranged as desired according to whether the boat is to be fitted out primarily for fishing, cruising, water skiing skin diving or just plain family boating. The arrangement shown is suitable for cruising as well as many other uses. The aft seats are 6’ long and can be used as bunks. The bunks under the forward deck and convertible top are optional.

12 pages, 6 plate(s)

$8.95
Angenette--A Block Island Fisherman (Pub. No. 5811)

designed By Wm. H. S. Oehrle

The accompanying plans of a 40-foot general purpose fisherman, intended for swordfishing in the summer and dragging during the remainder of the year
.

The original plans were prepared for Captain Earl C. Collins of Block Island; the bat was built in the Casco Bay Section of Maine. This yarn properly begins last winter when I stayed at Cliff Collins’ house on Block Island one week-end. During the evening of course we talked about boats, especially fishing boats, and after a while Cliff mentioned that some one had told him I designed boats once in a while, which I admitted, though during the war I was too busy with torpedoes to do any designing. Some time later Cliff added that he was thinking of having a boat built, a fishing boat of course, that two good men could work, just about the limit in size on the large side. That observation broughf out a few questions about what kind of fishing he intended to do, and that led to how big she should be, and so on and on; till we hunted up a pencil and a ruler and some paper and made a night of it. Cliff and I both feel that a good boat for our waters off the southern New England shore ought to have ample draft, with deep reverse frames aft, to be fairly sharp forward, with long easy buttocks aft, and if she’s to go dragging in the winter enough bulk to her quarters so she can bring in a fare of fish without settling too much by the Stern. Some weeks later I sent over some sketches of a small dragger type boat just under 40 feet long, with a small forecastle, large wheelhouse, separate engine room, etc., and asked what be thought of them. The answer came back with a request that I quit stalling and get to work on the building plans as he wanted to get her started. Finally I took a roll of blueprints over to his place and we had another evening of discussion, mostly about details and rigging as Cliff and his mate pronounced the hull just about right. These plans show a boat whose hull form, size, rig, and layout have been critically examined and passed on by some experienced fishermen, and a number of builders. One old-timer down in Maine who bid on her construction said the plans were 99 per cent perfect for a boat of this type, but he may have exaggerated a trifle. She was designed to be the largest boat two good men can work efficiently, a better than average sea boat, and a fairly good carrier. The hull form was not developed to get the greatest possible hold capacity, which might be an advantage in an out-and-out dragger; but to be easily driven, an advantage when swordfishing, at the same time retaining sufficient hold capacity to show a profit during the winter when she will have to go dragging or tie up. Considerable thought has been expended in an attempt to get a boat that can be driven home against a northwesterly winter gale without pounding hard or shipping much water to freeze on deck. Construction is strong, but not exceptionally heavy, although the deck and deck framing over the hold will seem enormous to most yachtsmen. The deck over the holds is the working space on a fisherman, and when he’s dragging in the winter the bunt of his trawl may weigh a couple of tons; he hauls it aboard over the side, lets it swing inboard and drops it on deck; and anything not built to take it soon carries away.

17 pages, 4 plate(s)

$8.95
Minimax (Pub. No. 5820)

by William D. Jackson

LOA 8 FT., BEAM 4 FT., WEIGH 68 LBS, CAPACITY 2

Most Popular of All S&M Boat Plans

Minmax is exactly what the name implies--a boat requiring the minimum in time and material to build to give you the maximum in performance and water-sport fun. Actually, Minimax was built in one day at a cost of $20. It will carry two people, take outboard motors ranging from 3 to 15 hp, has a watertight air compartment that will support 900 lbs. even with the cockpit completely filled with water. As to performance, Minimax will plane a 165 lb. man up to 15 mph with a 3 hp outboard motor. With 10 hp and over, the hull planing area diminishes until Minimax becomes air-borne and rides upon the motor's cavitation plate. Only two pieces of 4x8 ft. 1/4-in. thick plywood and ordinary lumber yard stock are required. Framing is held to an absolute minimum with plywood skin stressed to offer greatest strength and light weight. Complete and ready to go Mmimax weighs only 68 lbs. and may be handled by one man on a car-top carrier. No building form is required because the hull is developed on the plywood as the work progresses.

8 pages, 3 plate(s)

$7.95
Sea Hawk--A 21-Ft. Outboard Cabin Cruiser (Pub. No. 5823)

by William D. Jackson

LOA 21 FT 2 IN.,BEAM 8 FT., DRAFT 4 IN., WITH MOTOR UP, WEIGHT 975 LB.S LESS MOTOR.

If you re looking for a good, big, roomy cabin cruiser for overnight trips on protected waters or daytime deep-sea fishing, Sea Hawk is the boat for you.

Sea Hawk's forward cabin has bunk space for 2 adults and 2 children. Cots placed in the open cockpit will provide sleeping accommodations for another 3 adults. The two compartments just aft of the seats and under the cockpit cabin house the galley stove and equipment. Steering wheel and outboard-motor controls are located at the skipper's seat on the left or port side of the cockpit cabin. Sea Hawk is a big boat and unless you have a garage about 25 ft. long it will have to be built outside. However, the frames, transom and stem can be made up indoors. The bow assembly can also be temporarily fitted together indoors, then disassembled and erected outside when weather permits.

12 pages, 6 plate(s)

$8.95
Panther--High-Speed 15-Ft. Inboard Runabout (Pub. No. 5824)

by William D. Jackson

LOA 15 FT., BEAM 6 FT., DRAFT TO BOTTOM OF RUDDER 21 IN., WEIGHT 450 LBS. HULL ONLY, CAPACITY 2 PERSONS.

Panther, a runabout specially designed for use with today's lightweight, high-speed auto engines. Top speed is 75 mph, It could be driven faster, but it would then have only one point of contact with the water; its propeller.

Here, veritably, is a projectile for waterborne space travel, an inboard speedster with super clean and efficient running lines. With any present-day automobile engine (‘54 or later), or even with a “souped” ‘46 to ‘49  Ford or Mercury, speeds of 75 mph are possible with no sacrifice of stability. On the contrary, because of the employment of advanced methods of strut, rudder, and rearward motor installation, vibration is kept to a minimum. Finally, gas consumption is low because of low weight per hp, and power is applied so that there are minimal strains, maximum forward thrust and an almost complete absence of wave-making resistance. At speeds above 50 mph wake disappears and Panther begins to ride on its propeller. Panther was designed for use with any of the auto engines for which conversion parts are available. With an unaltered stock, 100 hp engine, you can attain speeds of over 45 mph. If you soup up such a motor and reduce the overall weight of boat and engine, you can get speeds of over 60 mph. For roughly $200 you can install a really “hot” motor that will haul from one to 10 water skiers, carry from two to four passengers—and pass up expensive inboards. Two years of developmental work have gone into Panther. The first engine used was a 1948 Mercury, the last, a 240 hp 1955 Buick. Every detail has been water-tested and retested. Don’t depart from the plans given; this is a high-speed craft and changes could be dangerous.

26 pages, 9 plate(s)

$9.95
Doodle Bug (Pub. No. 5825)

by William D. Jackson

Doodle Bug is a trim, single cockpit, outboard hydroplane.


Doodle Bug has a new type of convex bottom and non-tripping chines which combine to produce a remarkably fast boat with excellent maneuverability. Any outboard motor from 9 to 25 h.p. can be used to power Doodle Bug for thrilling speeds, miles faster than most present day factory made craft. The design was evolved by selecting the best points from a series of small hydroplanes and building them into this one boat And, before offering the boat to all of you boat enthusiasts, we built and tested two of them, both of which perform beautifully. The tails at the transom which produce the unusual streamlining effect of this attractive speedster may be omitted if you wish but our tests indicate that they improve its operation, and should be left as an integral part of the boat. Waterproof plywood is used to cover the frame work.

8 pages, 2 plate(s)

$7.95
Atomite (Pub. No. 5826)

by William D. Jackson

You can't beat this tiny hydroplane for high-speed fun afloat.

Here is a fast and furious, but at the same time, highly maneuverable 91/2 ft. outboard hydroplane, designed for outboard motors of 7- to 10 hp or larger.

10 pages, 1 plate(s)

$7.95
Eager Eve (Pub. No. 5831)

by William D. Jackson

LOA 18 FT., BEAM 6 FT 1 IN., WEIGHT OF HULL 600 LBS., CAPACITY SLEEPS 2, 4 PERSONS SEATED WITH DECK CHAIRS.

Efficient outboard cruiser with motor concealed in a well.

Eager Eve may be used for extended cruises upon inland waterways, or sports use at the home harbor, for sight seeing or pulling waer skiers and from 50 feet away you’d swear that Eager Eve was a luxury inboard cabin cruiser. A cover hides the 25 hp outboard motor that drives this efficient cruiser fast enough to keep up with or outrun nine out of ten inboards. In a first test Eager Eve, powered by an Evinrude 25 hp motor made 22 mph with one person aboard. Without a heavy inboard engine, you can transport it easily on a trailer and store it in a garage. Eager Eve is built upside down with extensions from the side frames secured to the floor.

19 pages, 6 plate(s)

$9.95
Piute (Pub. No. 5835)

Complete Plans For a Sensible Deep Sea Runabout

by Weston Farmer

LOA 24 FT., BEAM 6 FT. 6 IN., DRAFT 301/2 IN.

Piute was conceived miles offshore amid towering black seas such as seem to run only on October afternoons. The “modern” basket of slats I was ferrying across Lake Superior was typical of the fancy, or showroom school of design, and was making lousy weather of it. Right then it dawned on me why you never see the runabout type of boat on big water: they can’t take it. When you check them down to sensible going at a safe speed of 18 to 20 miles an hour, they get wet enough to drown you. So I dipped back into experience for that once-prevalent type of boat which could slice through the going in easy fashion. The call for “showroom” speed has killed off production of the type. But you can’t use any “showroom” speed except under ideal, or advertising conditions: Mediterranean blue skies, glassy surfaces on which everything appears like a shallop on a sea of dreams. The weather still blows on big water. It always will. It rains, too. And weather won’t wait. So since time is precious, why not have a boat that doesn’t have to wait, either? Piute is my answer to this need. Powerboat men who know big water will cheer her advent.

11 pages, 5 plate(s)

$7.95
Sun Dog (Pub. No. 5837)

by Weston Farmer

She’s handy and fast, safe in big water, economical to own.

LOA 30 FT 6 IN., BEAM 9 FT., DRAFT 241/2 IN.

Sun Dog is a fast-gaited, small cruiser of optimum size for three- or four-day cruises where you must cover a lot of water. With any of the standard marine power plants like the Gray, Universal, Chris-Craft or Chrysler in the 95 to 105 hp range, she will cruise easily at 14 miles all day, and will top 16 in a pinch. With a Chrysler “Crown,” she’ll cruise 16 and will do 17 to 19 miles light. The feature of minimum sleeping shelter and maximum lavatory, galley and cockpit accommodations has evolved from usage in deep-water fishing, such as is encountered off Miami, the coast of Peru, at Acapulco and Hawaii—all places where boats of almost the same dimensions, built by the farhous old Elco Works, Bayonne, N. J., have proven their sterling worth. And thereby hangs the story of Sun Dog’s genesis. If memory serves me rightly, about 45 cruisers of this type in several series were produced and sold by Elco some 12 to 14 years ago. The original hull was drawn by Bill Fleming, whose wonderful eye for beauty in hulls is second to none. Now, the sea never changes, and when you have a good hull, it always stays good. It was my good fortune to have done designing for this fine old firm, now gone out of the yacht game due to inflation, taxes, labor costs, etc. Though the type represented by Sun Dog had been superseded by a boat I designed for Elco, the superseding raised-decker of torpedo boat persuasion was based on Bill Fleming’s boat, and I got to know his Elcoette like a foster father. I always considered her the happiest strike in boat feel I ever knew.

11 pages, 3 plate(s)

$7.95
Scamper (Pub. No. 5839)

by Weston Farmer

How to build a strip boat.

LOQ 14 FT., BEAM 501/2 IN.,DRAFT 51/2 IN., WEIGHT 155 LBS.

Whether you cruise along the rockbound coast of Maine or on the mellifluous waters of the Chattahootchee, chances are you’ve iidden in a strip boat. They’re everywhere. And there is good reason for this. Time was when boatbuilders could spile a plank and fay a sawn frame, and thought nothing of building up a complete planked and framed-out clinker hull in one day for eight bucks. But now—-well, since anybody can nail one strip to another all day long, the boss hands a crew of two a bunch of slats, a transom, stem and keel, a power sander and says, “Last man done is a monkey’s uncle!” And the art of boatbuilding becomes a nailing contest. Which is just as well, I guess. What with a lot of things in the world being bastardized and watered down, it probably is good that the strip boat holds up. It has a rugged hull, of true boat shape, and one that requires a minimum of preparation for building since it fairs itself as you build and there is little need for lofting. The theory of the strip boat is so simple that just about anybody can grasp it. You have a transom, naturally, and a keel with an inside rabbet, and a stem. The girths are all equal in that portion of the hull where strips apply—-any differences in hull girth from the lower edge of the strips down to the rabbet are absorbed in one wide plank called the shutter, or stealer. To reverse the illustration: the stealer is fastened to the rabbet, and from that point up to the sheer, all the planking is in narrow strips, edge-nailed to each other, with girths from shutter or stealer to the sheer line all equal at each mold station. To provide a boat of this simple construction I have designed and built Scamper.

10 pages, 4 plate(s)

$7.95
Build Mucho Gusto (Pub. No. 5844)

by David D. Beach

Flashing speed for the hot-rod sailors is provided in this sweet little inboard craft. She is powered with a 25 hp. Crosley marine motor.

LOA 14 FT., BEAM 7 FT.

If you’re a speed enthusiast who wants high standards of performance from a boat that has the comforts and appearance of the smartest custom runabOut, Mucho Gusto is the answer to your prayers. For thrilling jaunts with another passenger, or for towing a single aquaplane or water skier, Mucho Gusto is your baby. Mucho Gusto is also economical to build and operate. It is a plywood-planked craft, constructed of universally available lumber, and is powered with an engine in the 25-to-45 hp range. The engine shown on the drawings is the standard 2:1 reduction gear Crosley which delivers 25 hp at about 4800 rpm’s. And by addition of Braje or other hop-up accessories, it can put out about 40 hp on normal fuel. Can’t you picture yourself behind that wheel, doing figure 8’s off the club anchorage, or out in the lake with the after lifting eye doing double duty as a towing cleat for a water skier astern? Better still, picture that same skier waving to the boys on the dock as you skim by! You’ll need little more than that to sell yourself on the idea.

12 pages, 3 plate(s)

$7.95
Simplex--A Military Type Outboard Cruiser (Pub. No. 5846)

by Weston Farmer

She is built of plywood, and will build for very little money for materials.

LOA 18 FT., BEAM 7 FT. 6 IN.

In the lake states where outboard motors are made—-Wisconsin, Minnesota, Michigan—you’ll find a bewildering maze of waterways ideally located for intriguing cruising. On these waters it either blows like sixty and everyone stays ashore, or it doesn’t blow at all and everyone and his brother goes afloat. For such water and service was Simplex designed. She is boxy and big for her inches. She is as simple as possible to build, giving consideration to strength and the whopping loads that craft of this type are asked to carry. Simplex is not the last grunt in speed, nor exactly the kind of boat for open water. On these points I’d prefer Sun Dance, the forerunner of Simplex, which appeared last year. But when it comes to breezing off the girlfriend, or taking out a pack of kids in calmer water, Simplex will provide the passenger-carrying bulk you need. She is contemporary in looks, and should please the Neo Whistler or Hot-Diggety school of boating advocates, for I have borrowed something from my PT boat designing experience and have given her something of that military persuasion. She is a good all-around boat; simple and cheap to build. Simplex is one of the few designs that can handle twin engines if need be. She will handle two 15 or two 25 hp outboards with ease, although she’ll be quite lively with one of either.

9 pages, 3 plate(s)

$7.95
How to Build Pint Size--An Outboard Hydroplane (Pub. No. 5848)

An A Class Outboard Stock Hydroplane

LOA 8 ft. 2 in., BEAM 45 in.

Pint Size was born during the 1951 Motor Boat Show. At that time only a few people were conscious of the need of large numbers of the outboard racing fraternity for more speed than was available with utility type boats. As the idea of using their well tuned, but strictly stock, motors on hydros was bandied about, the demands grew into a hurricane that literally tore the roof off racing officialdom. Only a few trials proved that the combination had what everybody was looking for. The little stock motors built by the hundreds of thousands in the past few years had the power required to drive the hydroplane-type boats at speeds far above those possible with utility hulls. It was only a matter of two months until the American Power Boat Association had given the new combination probationary status and the first authorized Stock Hydro plane racing was held during the Palm Beach, Florida, Regatta on March 4, 1951. By the end of March almost a hundred outfits were registered with the A.P.B.A. and when the summer racing season opens in the North it will not surprise too many if several hundred registrations have been made. First we will define an A Stock Hydroplane. The rules under which these new classes race are the time tested and approved rules for outboard hydroplane hulls and stock utility motors. These rules say that an A Stock Hydro is one that has a hull weight, including steering wheel, controls, hardware and permanently fastened padding, of not less than 100 pounds and is powered with a strictly stock outboard motor of between 10 and 15 cubic inch piston displacement. By a strictly stock motor is meant one that is just as it came from the factory, with no improvements or custom modifications. It was to these rules, but based on several recently successful boats, that Pint Size was designed. Let's look first at the lines plan. Note that the hull form is conventional, having a step about amidships and beveled chines both forward and aft. The deck is of easy curve and the cockpit is enough to take most moderately sized drivers. The offsets give the dimensions in inches and eighths to the outside of the planking and all the lines should be reproduced full size.

8 pages, 3 plate(s)

$7.95
Outboard Racing Runabout (Pub. No. 5851)

Designed by William F. Crosby

LOA 13 ft., BEAM 5 ft.

The idea that we are presenting at this time is not a new one to the sailboatmg fraternity but it certainly has not been broached to the outboard drivers so far as we know. Briefly, it is the suggested plan for a one-design outboard race class and by one-design we mean just that--all boats exactly alike and the engines as closely alike as they can be made. As a one-design class it means that the boats must be built like the plans and like the lines. Waterproof plywood is specified for the outside and therefore you can't plank it of mahogany, cedar or some other wood but must use the plywood indicated and in the size shown. Frames, stringers, keel and all other members must be made as closely to the plans as possible. The deck, cockpit arrangements and all other parts must be like the plans. You can't use a canvas deck. All this may sound a bit rough, and possibly some of you will remark that with racing of this type there can be little or no progress. Such is not the case, because there is still plenty of room for development among the open classes, the one-design being proposed for those who are tired of trying to keep up with the open classes. If one-design outboards can be developed along these lines, there is no reason why you could not get several seasons of practical use and racing from the same outfit. Something that is rather impossible today in the open classes. The idea of one-design racing has been so successful in the sailboat field that there is absolutely no reason why the same thing could not be done in the power boats. The inboard Pacific Coast One-design class has spread from coast to coast and its rules and restrictions are based exactly on sailing one-design class rules. It can be accomplished even more easily in the outboard race field and consequently this plan has been developed in the hope that some of you may become sufficiently interested to get the thing started. The boat complies with the outboard runabout rules of the National Outboard Assotiation both in minimum dimensions and weight so even if you do not race as a one-design class, you still can race with the runabouts. She is designed for a class C motor-20 to 30 cubic inches piston displacement-and while we are not making any predictions as to speed, those who are supposed to know, state that this hull with a proper racing motor would give a good account of itself anywhere. The wooden deck has been added, not for walking purposes, but to add strength to the hull and to prevent its opening up. Non-tripping chines will make her turn better and will make the boat safer. The cockpit is arranged for one person but the wheel may be shifted to one side and two may be seated in comfort.

8 pages, 2 plate(s)

$7.95
Holiday--A Twenty-Foot Runabout or Cruiser (Pub. No. 5853)

by William J. Deed

LOA 20 ft., BEAM 6 ft. 4 in., DRAFT 2 ft. 1 in.

Here is a small craft of moderate price offering two boats in one design, an open runabout and a cruiser for weekend or short cruises. We show one layout as an open boat, and a cabin unit of light weight which can be dropped in place to transform the boat into a cruiser. Hull form is vee bottom with developable surfaces on the sides and bottom so flat plywood sheets can be bent in place. To convert the runabout into a weekend cruiser, the seat backs are hinged to let down and form a double berth, while under the seats are found a stove, galley stores, portable icebox, dishes, etc., and possibly a water closet or bucket under one of the seats. The cabin is a lightweight unit which is easily lowered in place and fastened by several bolts as shown. When the boat is used as an open runabout this cabin unit is kept in a boathouse, garage or other place. The open boat windshield unit is removed before dropping the cabin inplace. Of course the cabin could be built on permanently if desired, but either with or without the cabin this is an attractive boat.

4 pages, 5 plate(s)

$7.95
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