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How to Build Dockside-Too--A Split-Level Houseboat (Pub. No. 5855)

by David Beach

LOA 38 ft., BEAM 16 ft.

This houseboat is a veritable home afloat. It is designed for real living—for fishing, for parties or for basking in the sun on the spacious upper deck

There probably is not a single reader of this page who doesn’t dream a bit now and then. A goodly number, maybe most of the people, are not going to build a boat; but they are going to dream about having one. Some of us dream about sailing to Tahiti on a gaff-headed ketch, and some dream about cruising Down East to Fundy in a salty dragger conversion. Others, I’m sure, dream of high-speed frolics offshore in a spray-tossing runabout. How many of us dream about life afloat in the manner of the man who built his home by the side of the road where he could watch the world go by? Not many have, I wager, but there will be more and more each day these pages are read and studied. The design accompanying these words is, as the poet said, “the stuff that dreams are made of.” It was designed from the gray smoke that makes hazy the work-a-day world, and should provide a rosy glow to much of the play that a lively imagination does with the dreams we all have. It does not take much imagination to place the angular structure of Dockside-Too across the end of a pier, or moved just off the channel between two clusters of stakes. Even tied to the dock or in a slip at a large marina. She can be almost anywhere, and you can visualize her decks alive with guests or quiet as a lazy couple recline in chairs in the sun on the upper deck. Dreaming can be easy with a subject like this for stimulation. Shall we stimulate a dream or two? Let’s look first at the outside of this craft and then at the interior, and see what develops. As can easily be noticed, this is no gently curving boat with graceful flare and overhangs. A houseboat is a home afloat, primarily, not to be driven into the teeth of a nor’easter. It is therefore a house on a barge—-square and boxy, with rails, overhanging roofs and square windows. But note that there is full access all around her deck edge, with walkways along the length and decks on the ends. Note also that these decks at the ends are opened onto by wide folding doors that extend the size of the spaces enclosed by the deckhouse structure. Lefs now step aboard. The access is from the dock or dinghy to the small boarding areas at the main deck level on the stern end. Why the stern, when both ends of the hull are alike? I don’t know why this should be the stern, except that the bow is generally drawn to the right; so if these boarding platforms are on the lefthand end of the drawing, that must be the stern of the houseboat.
    Now that we have gone up the few steps to the upper deck, we should gaze about. The deck is well above the water, and you can look over the trunks and cabins of most of the boats about you. If you are moored away from the shore, you have an excellent view all around. Now, sliding back the screen door, you can enter the deckhouse lounge or salon. The inboard profile view shows that it can be fitted with contemporary-design furniture, which the architect likes, or it can be furnished in the traditional yacht style with wicker and tubular furniture. The deckhouse is well windowed. Large picture windows have sliding sections at each end for cross ventilation, while on the forward bulkhead, sliding windows provide for ventilation in that direction. Take note of the overhangs all around, as these keep the sun out and permit the breeze to flow through the area even when there is rain. Venetian blinds or drapery can provide privacy when you need it.
    A feature of the deckhouse salon is the full-width shelf forward that extends the interior space without changing the floor area. A fine place for the television set, an end of books, a vase of flowers or some sculpture. Extending into the salon to starboard is a small U-shaped railing over the stairwell from the main deck level. This rail is constructed with a single strap of metal bent in a vertical zigzag, capped by a varnished hand rail. Outboard, to starboard, is a companionway to the lower level, and we’ll go down that to the galley-dining area.
    This space, on the main deck of the barge hull, is a large area, as it must accommodate the dual activities of food preparation and food consumption. The design of the area is straightforward, right out of the small-residence stylebook. There is a long counter with built-in stove and double sink, some working space, some lockers beneath and overhead and a modest refrigerator. The food-preparation area faces a full-length expanse of windows, just above counter height so the cook will never want for scenery. When the sun gets too low, the blinds can be dropped to cut down the glare.
    The area remaining can be arranged in many ways. Some may think that a built-in dinette or nook is a better idea than the single pedestal table with individual chairs. Dream on . . . and see if you can think of how to build a dining counter or bar into that space. it can be done, and quite properly, if you like to take your meals that way. Even afloat on a vacation, the architect likes to sit at a table, so that’s how it was drawn. Okay?
    Note that the galley counter, which is covered with a decorative plastic top such as Formica, is fairly flush. The stove is shown set in a recess, with a hinged cover that folds back when the stove is in use. The double sink is a stainless steel one, right out of the Sears catalog. The cabinet work on the counters is exactly the same as in the kitchen ashore, and the lockers are just as spacious. Recessed lighting in the cabin ceiling puts illumination where it is needed and can be either incandescent or fluorescent, to suit.
    The heavy-duty vinyl floor coverings which are available now would be just right for this area, and the color or pattern can blend harmoniously with the rest of the room. The table and chairs shown are quite modern, of the single-pedestal type, and the chairs have colorful cushions to accent the white plastic of the seats. Put a couple of candles in hurricane lamps on the table, and the crystal and silver will sparkle as they would ashore. You’ll really enjoy a formal party with another couple. Champagne, everyone?
    The last area is down the stairs, beneath the railing of the upperdeck salon. These stairs, with their white rubber treads, descend to a smallish vestibule having two doors. The door straight ahead opens into the bedroom. Maybe it should be called the “master stateroom,” but it is more properly the bedroom. The plan view shows the double bed, with end tables and bed lamps. The room air conditioner is set in the wall over the head of the bed, with the circulators set not to blow down on the occupants. There is ample room for a vanity table, a pair of low dressers and even a couple of chairs. This stateroom could even hold a small desk if the owner desired or needed one.
    Off the forward end of the stateroom, through a pair of louvered doors, is a spacious walk-in closet. This will provide ample stowage for a wardrobe, certainly so if shelves for linens and the like are built as desired. Way back in this closet is a smallish door into the “hold,” the crawl space beneath the kitchen-dining area. It is in this space that the mechanical equipment of Dockside-Too is located. More about that later.
    The other door from the stateroom opens to the bathroom. This is no ordinary “head,” as you’d expect in a conventional cruiser or small yacht, but a spacious bathroom with all the fittings and fixtures of comfort ashore. There is ample room, and much can be done to decorate this in distinctive fashion. The architect considers that the large fiber-glass bathtub should be the focal point, and the color impregnated therein will set the theme for the rest of the room. Imagine a light pink tub, with a red rug on a white vinyl floor. Picture a pink Formica counter top and white walls . . . or even a dramatic colored curtain across the window. The opportunities for subtle or dramatic decor are presented in this bathroom space. Note that all the fixtures are identical with those in your house ashore. Again, the hardware department in the big store at the shopping center has all the necessary fittings.

11 pages, 5 plate(s)

$6.95
24-Foot Fisherman's Launch (Pub. No. 5856)

by Edson I. Schock

A good sea boat and a fishermans dream, she will also take your friends and family for a ride or a picnic.

19 pages, 2 plate(s)

$8.95
How to Build Amigo Mio (Pub. No. 5858)

by Davod D. Beach

LOA 18 ft., BEAM 41 1/2"

This high-performance runabout will take seas or heavy wakes without spine-jarring pounding. You, too, will learn to call her a dear friend

The designer always wonders if readers and prospective builders are interested in how these designs are originated. It seems to him that, because these designs all have a personal flavor, it would be of at least passing interest to know the background of each boat that appears in this publication. Like many others, this design reflects a feeling on the part of the architect that there are other boat enthusiasts who think as he does. Of course, personal enthusiasm is one thing, but that enthusiasm must be transferred to the editor so that he and his aides can be convinced. Then the design drawings are prepared with careful detail, so that your enthusiasm can be kindled. It sounds like a simple process, which it is, but it does involve a considerable expenditure of time, thought and work. My own thinking about this type of boat goes way back into the past. Runabouts are fun, and since the days immediately after World War II, I’ve been involved in building runabouts in the several production boat plants where I’ve worked. Some were plain little craft, which were made to a strict price; but those most close to my heart were quite deluxe, with first-class treatment of all the details of style and features. They were really not workaday craft, but designs into which much personal feeling was incorporated, so that they became important. They were “my” boats: I saw them through all their problem stages. They became like old friends, and it is in that manner that this present design was born. The plans show much of what I like in runabouts and what was incorporated in previous designs; and so it, too, is like an old friend. Which thought provided the name for the design: Amigo Mio. So much for the personalities. We will now discuss the boat. You should study the several drawings, because they are the meat of this effort and are all-important. Then we will discuss the whys and wherefores of this high-performance runabout with reference to these plans. First, let us consider the drawing containing the four views of the boat in several optional forms. This shows a big runabout in the high dead rise, prismatic afterbody hull form initially promulgated years ago by some basic researchers at the NACA model towing tank at Langley Field. This soft-riding hull is a descendant of the big flying boats which were produced by that basic planing-hull research carried on some decades ago. Curious, isn’t it, how this hull form, together with the old, longitudinal steps, has suddenly become de rigueur? It is, however, a good form, not given to spine-jarring pounding in moderate chop, and devoid of the wild oscillations in pitch attitude which the public calls “porpoising.” It’ll turn well, banking into the turn without skid or spinout, and will perform entirely satisfactorily when fitted with engines of a wide variation in power. The reader can see the inherent performance characteristics by a study of the Lines Plan, in light of the above. Two topside arrangements are indicated, to show that the boat may be used as a ski tug or as a normal runabout, and the windshield side panels, railings, canopy tops and deck hardware all contribute to the character desired by the builder. The simple wrap-around windshield can be eliminated or, if the builder wants to be completely first class, the windshield may be of varnished mahogany complete with chromed binding, adjusters and hinges. The side rails will add a good amount of sparkle to the deck. Note that there is a seating option. A pair of individual bucket seats are shown aft in the cockpit, on either side of the shafting housing. These can be replaced by a full-width cushioned lounge of ample proportions, suitable for sunning or whathave-you. Of course, the large double seat forward can be split to allow for two conventional, individual bucket seats, so there is a wide selection of cockpit interiors for most uses to which the boat may be put.

8 pages, 5 plate(s)

$7.95
How to Build Skat Kat (Pub. No. 5859)

by Rogers Winter

LOA 12 FT., BEAM 3 ft. 11 in.

This “hot rod” with the hull form of a scow-type hydroplane will provide plenty of speed—and doesn’t require a monster motor. In fact, 15-hp--the safety limit—should produce speeds up to 50 miles per hour

Skat Kat is fun boat—fun to build and fun to run. She goes fast. Technically, this “hot rod” has the hull form of a scow-type hydroplane, a type that at one time held a good many world speed records. Breaking records, however, was not what was in mind when Skat Kat was designed. Rather, it was intended that this boat be something to have fun with in the water and, at the same time, not be a craft that would require an enormous motor to push it up to good speeds. Theoretically Skat Kat will hit 40 mph with a 10-hp outboard on her stern, and something in the neighborhood of 50 mph with a 15. These speeds are based on the somewhat conservative standards of the Society of Small Craft Designers, figuring the combined weight of hull, motor and pilot at 300 pounds. It is impossible, however, for any designer to state categorically that any particular boat will attain a certain speed. There are too many variables. One motor will be in better condition than another, producing more horsepower; and any hull will vary in weight according to what kind of lumber is used. In addition, two identical boats, built from the same plans, will vary several miles per hour in speed because of small variations in the hull that are Unnoticeable even to skilled eyes. In the final analysis, however, Skat Kat wifi produce plenty of speed—so much, in fact, that it is suggested very strongly that no motor over 15 hp be used. It would be unsafe.

8 pages, 4 plate(s)

$7.95
19-Foot Outboard Cruiser (Pub. No. 5860)

by Bruce N. Crandall

LOA 18 ft. 10 in., BEAM 7' 11 1/2 in., DRAFT 12 in., DISPLACEMENT 2280 lbs.

This is an all-purpose plywood cruiser designed for amateur construction and for use with the most popular-sized outboard motors. It is a convex-V-bottom, developable-surface model of the type best suited to carrying heavy loads at planing or semi-planing speeds under all kinds of water conditions. The plans are arranged for easiest construction by the amateur builder, consistent with strength and light weight. I consider this an ideal-size outboard cruiser because it is the smallest which can contain complete cruising accommodations suitable for long cruises and at the same time is almost the maximum size for easy trailering behind an ordinary car. Wider beam is seldom allowed to run freely on the highways, and anything much longer or inboard-powered is likely to become too heavy for easy launching and loading. There are almost unlimited cruising opportunities for a boat of this type, for it can be trailered to different waterways each trip. For this reason the hull has been designed for use on as large and open bodies of water as are practical for any boat of this size. It is also ideal for shallow-water use because of outboard power, light weight and shallow draft, and so may be used on lakes, rivers and bays of all sorts and sizes. The arrangement has been worked out to give maximum space and convenience while living aboard. As the Arrangement Plan shows, there is plenty of room for two bunks in the cabin, and a galley and toilet are included. The headroom is over 4½’ under the cabin beams. In the galley area it is 4’ 9” with the hatch closed and much more, of course, with it open. The aft seat in the cockpit is 6’ wide and can be used as a bunk, making complete cruising accommodations for three persons. The hull is large and stable enough to use with a convertible top and even complete canvas enclosure of the cockpit in calm waters, if desired.

12 pages, 6 plate(s)

$8.95
Dory-Style 10-Ft. Skif, A (Pub. No. 5864)

by Edson I. Schock

As a project for long winter evenings, what could be better than this ideal boat for fishing or rowing?


8 pages, 4 plate(s)

$7.95
How to Build Maumee Maid (Pub. No. 5871)

by David D. Beach

This 26-footer has all the essentials that are needed for summer after summer of comfortable family river cruising.

8 pages, 4 plate(s)

$7.95
Kingfisher (Pub. No. 5879)

by Weston Farmer

LOA 17 ft., Beam 6.5 ft. Weight 1,300 lbs.

Build her in your garage over one winter. You can trail her anywhere and use her on almost any water. Use the smallest, or up to 60 hp inboard power

Clinker-built boats are coming back strong. To meet the resurgence toward clinker construction I have designed Kingfisher. She is 17 ft. overall, and is therefore the smallest of similar inboard powered craft. She comes between the point where the 15-footers of outboard flash leave off and the 18 and 19 and 20-footers of inboard persuasion begin. She has 6’6” of beam, weighs near 1,300 lbs. ready to launch, and so will haul and trail easily. She is a high-sided little mite, having 34” freeboard at the stemhead and 271/2” freeboard at the transom. This makes her proportionately deeper but that, too, is a good thing: wind will bother her passengers less, and since she has “good long legs” in her lateral plane, cross winds won’t knock her about. Her deep entering forefoot helps in that regard. A slight hollow to the water lines results, which purls the bow wave under in pretty fashion. I have built a model and tested it, and Kingfisher will prove very free running. The Brennan Imp will push the boat 12 to 14 miles an hour. The slightly larger Universal Atomic Four of 25 hp will give you 14 to 15 miles, as will a Gray Seascout or a Kermath Sea Cub. For those who want real “rush,” a Gay Lugger of 33 hp will give 17 to 18 miles, and any of the 60 hp 133 cu. in. kit boat motors like the Gray, or Chris Craft “B” (built around a Hercules block) or the Universal Unimite wifi give 22 miles. More power will just be wasted. To anticipate the inevitable—yes, she can also be built as an outboard by the simple expedient of cutting away the trailing skeg, framing the transom to suit a motor opening. A 25 hp outboard would “poosh” her 16 to 18 miles an hour, light.     Lest some who have a bit of knowhow, but little know-why, accuse me of imitating anything like the Lyman Islander or similar craft such as the Century or the Cruisalong Buccaneer, let me call to the attention of such that it was 24 years ago that the plans for Kidette appeared. This was a 17-footer of my design which had wide beam, clinker topsides, a 32 hp light motor, and exactly the same cockpit layout as today’s most imitated boats. I am not suggesting that today’s designers of the highly popular clinker utilities ever saw the plans of Kidette. What I am pointing out is your up-raised eyebrow is that Kidette, placed alongside the most imitated boat of today would show the same general characteristics, and would cop the First-of-Type Trophy. Kingfisher is small enough to be squeezed into the average garage when building.

8 pages, 2 plate(s)

$7.95
Building a Jersey Speed Skiff (Pub. No. 5880)

by David D. Beach

LOA 16 ft., beam about 6 ft.

What single design is right for Dad to use for fishing, Sis to use for her wafer skiing. big Brother for racing? It is the popular 16-footer Speed Skiff

The Speed Skiff shown here is the answer to the questions of what single design is suitable for Dad to use for fishing, for Sis to use for her water skiing and for the boy in the family to race at the local regattas. When the problem is complicated by wanting a good familystyle runabout, too, the Speed Skiff is certainly the boat that meets all requirements. Before discussing the construction of the craft, it seems appropriate to give some information about the development of the type and to explain the reasons for its popularity. The Speed Skiff evolved, over many years, along the Jersey coast where sea-keeping abilities and speed have always been prized characteristics in any craft. Here, under the eyes of critical boatbuilders and fishermen, the present form has developed. They were family boats first and raceboats second, but the builders never lost sight of the fishing craft origin of the type. Freeboard, length and beam were specified, as was the fact that decks should support two people. These skiffs were not to degenerate, the officials decided, into cut-down racing craft, and they have not. The Outboard Profile shows a plain lap-strake boat with a raked bow and transom. A middle deck separates the forward cockpit from the aft cockpit; the boat is steered from the aft cockpit. The Arrangement shows a spacious forward cockpit, extending to the stem and a wide seat across the boat in each cockpit. The aft cockpit is dominated by the vertical steering column which is peculiar to this type of boat. As the Construction Plan shows, this column contains a rack and pinion steerer control in its base, to provide positive steering with no backlash or cable problems. The space behind the rear seat is occupied by a large cylindrical fuel tank, above which is a high-sided shelf, just right for lunch or tackle boxes, or for coiling the ski-tow lines. As, can be readily seen, the boat is without frills, and its simplified arrangement lends itself with no trouble to all the diverse uses to which such & craft may be put.

7 pages, 4 plate(s)

$7.95
Andalusia (Pub. No. 5885)

by Weston Farmer

LOA 34 ft., Beam 9 ft. 4 in., Draught 34 in. Weight 11, 318 lbs.

Andalusia is small as yachts go. You'll find her great for northern waters

This story of Andalusia is not a how-to-build story in the usual sense. I am not going to tell you how to bruise your nearest thumb with the nearest hammer. Rather, this is a story for those who believe in the importance of noodling a new thing just for the excitement of it. It is always refreshing to conjure something new in boats, especially if the ship is a departure from the ordinary and is based on sound practice. She is novel in that she is designed for a real need. We’ve had designs of V-bottomed pointed house trailers which are fine for southern service. They’ll float on a morning dew, go to leeward like a paper bag in any kind of breeze, will slam in any sea, and will roll your neck until your teeth ache because they have excessive beam—-said beam following every uplift and heave, jerkily, because the boat is so wide it has to do this. But we have had few boats for the northern scene—-the waters of Maine, of Georgian Bay, of the Great Lakes and Puget Sound. Here it is often rainy, always windy, frequently cold. Sharpened house trailers with accent on chrome and mahogany are sucker bait in waters like these. So I have made Andalusia in reduced image of the little Caróo motorships a person sees sagging past the green coasts, alabaster, houses and red-tiled roofs of Andalusia, hence her name. I suppose you’d call her a tug-type yacht. She will have some of the wonderful, weighty fore-reaching ability of the tug hull, and she does have a tug-type fantail stern. On second thought, I wouldn’t call her—-just go on betting on her and you can count on her to take care of you and your family on any dark night, no matter what the welter of weather outside the cabin. You may not like the layout. Okay—sketch in your own. This hull will handle about any arrangement you want. She can carry several imore tons than I show, and will never feel it. My main idea in designing her was to get away from trying to pack a 5-room apartment into an 18-foot cheese carton. For instance, you may want more aft deck, and may not like the aft cabin. All right—just run the cabin bulkhead down to the level of the main clamp, deck her cockpit over and use the aft quarters under the cockpit sole for storage. It is my reasoned prediction that Andalusia will appeal in direct proportion to the amount of real cruising experience you’ve had. The man buying his first “cruiser” is often looking for the Fountain of Youth: He must cover 500 miles the first afternoon, he must sleep 60 people in his 15-footer, and reckon not the cost of speed, little realizing that his pocketbook must be sublimated in some way to an oil refinery where fuel grows on bushes. Your seasoned man knows his craft must be big enough not to wallow if she’s going to have comfort, and that the fewer you sleep, the better. Two or three will be plenty. And speed? Keep it low! Any 9- or 10-mile craft can comfortably do 100 miles a day if you know when to start out and when to pull into harbor. Let’s look at the layout, and describe it: basically it is the layout of the usual cruising boat just turned around. Instead of narrow bunks forward, followed by a cramped galley, opening into a saloon, or deckhouse, followed by a cockpit, I have reversed the usual. In so doing we gain much. Forward in Andalusia is the head, or toilet. This narrow, cussed, and infrequently used chunk of equipment demands only that portion of floor space due it. Privacy is gained by the companion doors which close off the main deckhouse. By disposing of the head quickly we get the rest of the ship to use for layout. Have you ever noticed on real ships there is an engine room? A roomy place where machinery can be maintained? Most cruising men come by their love of the game through a secondary love of good engines, and like to keep their machine brass bright and squeegeed down with clean rags. Andalusia’s engine is down forward in a space amply large to allow access all around. Machinery in such a place lasts longer, runs sweeter, is more reliable for the attention it thus gains. Motor weight in this ship is only about 5 per cent of total displacement, therefore the positioning of the mill weight—wise is not critical. Andalusia, like many craft her size, ought to be ballasted to final trim anyway.

12 pages, 4 plate(s)

$7.95
Sea Biscuit (Pub. No. 5886)

by Weston Farmer

LOA 8 ft., Beam 4 ft.

Want a real speed box? You will get it here. She’ll build for about $30 in materials* screws and paint—and even an amateur will build her in 40 hours. Power her with 5 hp— and she’ll give speed aplenty!

It seems like yesterday, but it was nearly thirty years ago when Lockwood-Ash came out with a 4 hp Opposed outboard that was hot enough to plane a flattish light boat. Soon Johnson countered with 6 hp, and the next few seasons saw a new kind of small boat appearing in locust numbers on all waterways. I can remember what a great day it was for boating when Lockwood-Ash first planed a boat with a kicker! Each new planing design gave the game a shot in the arm. The biggest shot of all was a little craft doped out by Bruno Beckhard of Long Island, an outboard dealer with a knack for experimenting. Bruno designed a little speed box 8 ft. long by 4 ft. beam which could be built in a couple of afternoons. Shortly, Bruno’s boat was cleaning up right and left. Various versions of the idea were built and the plans were published under such names is Cute Craft, Nize Baby, Sez You and others Thousands of them wets bullt. Even in those days this writer was designing hydroplanes and racing them. In the many years applied to naval architecture since, much has been learned of planing hydrodynamics. New materials like plywood and plastics are now available, motors have been lightened, power zipped up. Pounds-per-horsepower, the criterion of speed over water, has been halved. All of which is why it seemed a logical development to me to recook Bruno’s ancient basic idea—make a simple 8 ft. by 4 ft. box, use plywood for low hull weight, and put a completely new bottom between the chines that would embody latest hydrodynamic thinking. The result: hard to design, easy to build Sea Biscuit. This little speed box is 8 ft. long inside her raked bow baffle, and 4 ft. beam at the bow, her greatest width. She’ll build for about $30, in materials, screws and paint. A man can lay her out in about 3 hours; the transoms and frames can be built and erected in a day. Planking will take longer. An organized boat shop can build a Sea Biscuit in 2 working days, but an amateur would take closer to 40 hours. Thus $30 and 40 hours after starting you can be trying out a Sea Biscuit ofyour own. Bruno Bekhard’s sensation was built with arcuate frames, inverted from bow to mid-length. From that point aft the bottom was absolutely “flat’ athwartship. This made Bruno’s craft unbankable’ and hence hard to turn. I drove many such hulls, and occasionally would forget the nature of the beast and throw her into too tight a turn. Immediately I would find myself with considerable loss of dignity and total absence of boat flapping through the air to another part of the lake. Our boat here has a different bottom. Dead rise has been apportioned throughout that part of her length which bears on water, and in a fore and aft direction longitudinal concavity has been provided to make her run flat. Sea Biscuit will handle better, run flatter than the old cute crates. An ordinary 5 hp kicker will make her whiz. Power her with 71/2 hp and she’ll go faster than you care to drive this tiny boat.

8 pages, 4 plate(s)

$7.95
Cruisemite (Pub. No. 5887)

by Douglas Bacon

LOA 20 ft., Beam about 12 ft.

Here is simplicity and ecorlomy for the backyard boatbuilder! This little cruiser is stout, chunky and fine for family use.

Cruisemite, like all boats, is a compromise design. Instead of speed, high power and lightness, I’ve tried to think ahead for the life you’ll really live with the boat (as against fireside dreams) and I’ve turned out a roomy little cruiser that can change with your needs. She is not built of plywood. Just ordinary seam and batten construction is used. Nearly everyone who has a smattering of boating knows this type of construction and can build it. A boat like Cruisemite, nearly 20 ft. long, is really too large an order for the amateur when constructed of plywood. One-sheet planking is good for production in a well-heeled shop where there are a lot of hands. The amateur, building on his own, is better off with smaller pieces that he can handle and fit. After providing easier construction, attention was given to lines. After all, almost all current outboard cruiser designs are for the big motor fellows. No one has yet done a good, safe, slogging sort of boat for contemporary 10 to 15 hp motors, of which there are many more running than the 25 hp kind. So Cruisemite’s lines are for speeds from 8 to 12 mph—a pace that gets nobody into trouble. It is a speed which experienced boatmen know is better for relaxed running and safe night cruising. (Hit a pulp log at 20 mph on a dark night and see what happens to the sheetplanked jobs. Even the pistons in your motor will change holes!) You want something safe for your family. Kids are pretty precious. Cruisemite is a family boat from the outset. Th mnan who starts boating with an outboard will likely go eventually to inboard power. No need to get rid of Cruisemite, then. She’ll convert. So there'll be no problem of what to do with the hull you’ve grown to like. Thus I show also an inboard construction profile with an inboard motor. Nothing elaborate. The 5 hp DuBrie with a 12x15 three-blade wheel at 960 rpm will kick this craft along at 7 to 8 mph burning 3 gallons of gas in 10 hours, so the makers state. Other engines of low power are shown. About top limit would be the Universal four-cylinder 25 hp Utility, not shown.

7 pages, 5 plate(s)

$7.95
Rigging a Small Power Boat for Water Skiing (Pub. No. 7730)

The professional way to rig a ski boat is to install a deck pylon in the cockpit. Several kinds of pylons are available. Most have legs that mount on fittings to form a sturdy tripod. The pylon is quickly detachable and folds for stowage. So, if you use your boat as an all-purpose family craft, for picnicking and fishing as well as skiing, it makes the boat quickly convertible. The advantage of a ski pylon is that it adds stability to the boat by moving the center of effort forward to the center of the craft, keeps the tow line high and clear of the motor, and reduces sudden slack in the line when a skier is maneuvering back and forth. Here's how to do it!

3 page(s)

$3.50
Sport--A V-Bottom, Air-Cooled, Inboard in Plywood (Pub. No. 7818)

Sport is a V-bottomed inboard ideally designed for fishing on bays, lakes or streams. The boat is relatively fast and holds four persons comfortably. The air-cooled motor can be from 21/2 to 6 hp.

4 page(s)

$3.50
How to Build Water Skis (Pub. No. 7851)

by Hi Sibley

All steps for making the skis are shown on these two pages.

2 page(s)

$3.50
12' Skiff Specially Designed for an Outboard, A (Pub. No. 7852)

This boat is convenient and useful for rough work, or it may be used as a tender, while on account of its flat keelless bottom and almost straight run it can be easily driven by an outboard motor. It is a fine weather boat very suitable for shallow water and is light enough to be readily hauled up and down on beaches.

2 page(s)

$3.50
Building a 13-Foot Skiff (Pub. No. 7853)

While this skiff will carry three persons easily and safely, it was primarily designed for the person who likes to go out alone and ride the waves when the ordinary has to stay in. The designer built one for himself, used it on Lake Michigan, and found it exceptionally satisfactory in every way. For her size she is extremely seaworthy, and a wonderful surf boat--she has repeatedly come in through the surf when boats twice her size would not tackle it.

2 page(s)

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Building a 19-Foot Tunnel-Stern Boat (Pub. No. 7854)

The following boat has been used on the Mississippi River for two seasons and has been very satisfactory. She was designed especially for river use and draws only twelve inches of water. She is a flat-bottomed boat, but when she is in the water this is not noticeable, and, with her long front deck, is a very classy-looking craft. The cockpit is large and the lockers have ample room in them to stow everything that is necessary. The engine, being under the front deck, is out of the way, with no danger of engine trouble from rain or spray; there is also lots of room for engine supplies, making it possible to keep the cockpit and lockers clean. She is easy to build, even the tunnel, as shown, being very simple. Any one who can saw a board or drive a nail can build her.

3 page(s)

$3.50
Building a 151/2-Foot Useful Sharpie for Power (Pub. No. 7855)

Two-in-one is a practical little boat intended for all-around service. She is a motor boat in every sense of the word and, as shown, fitted with sail and centerboard, makes an ideal craft for the man with the summer cottage or the chap who enjoys short party sails and fishing trips.

4 page(s)

$3.50
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