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Voyageur (Pub. No. 5181)

by William D. Jackson, Navel Architect

If you are looking for the ideal family cabin cruiser designed especially for the backyard builder, this is it. It will comfortably carry six adults for day cruising and sleep 4 (two in the cabin and two in the cockpit) for overnight cruises. Because it will float in 3 tin. of water, with the outboard motor swung up, it’s an excellent craft for shallow-water rivers and lakes. Scow-type hull makes it possible to run the bow right up on the beach so passengers may step ashore dry shod. When powered with a 1956, 30 hp Evinrude Big Twin outboard, "Voyageur ' has a top speed of 20 mph with two people aboard. Planing action begins at 12 mph.

16 pages, 5 plate(s)

8.01€
Sun Fish (Pub. No. 5182)

by William D. Jackson, Naval Architect

Novel scow-bow design on this 375-lb., outboard-powered cruiserette permits easy beaching.

"Sun Fish" is an unconventional looking cruiserette which weighs only 375 pounds and is powered by an outboard, It can be transported by trailer easily and has accommodations for two persons for overnight trips. The scow-type bow allows it to be landed on shelving beaches, which means dry feet for the passengers on embarking. As for speed, the "Sun Fish" will do 5 to 35 mph. A 5 hp outboard motor will propel "Sun Fish" about 6 mph while a 10 hp motor will shove the loaded hull with two persons aboard at an 8 mph clip. With speeds of over 16 mph, planing action takes place and speeds of 10 to 35 mph are possible. Construction of "Sun Fish" is simple. No difficult joinery work is necessary.

6 pages, 2 plate(s)

6.22€
Sea Rover (Pub. No. 5183)

by William D. Jackson, Naval Architect

This 3-in-I ocean-going outboard can be built as a sports, utility or cabin model in either a 15 or 17 ft. length.

What's your cruising pleasure? Chances are, this adaptable design has what you want. If a stylish open water sportster is what you have in mind, fine; if you prefer a cabin cruiser, Sea Rover be made in that style, too. Or if you just want to get around with ease, there’s the economy style outboard model of Sea Rover. And that isn’t all. If the 15-foot length of the original version is too snug for you, for a few more dollars you can convert this plan to a 17-footer. If you have trouble getting exterior grade plywood, you can use the lap strake planking instead of plywood covering. And, finally, you even have a choice of motor mountings for rough or smooth waters.

24 pages, 6 plate(s)

8.91€
Screwball (Pub. No. 5184)

by William D. Jackson, Naval Architect

Pram type boats are not new, but this version of the type is. It has all the latest wrinkles: adaptability to plywood construction, easy fabrication, and a convex bottom with non-trip chines affording maneuverability at any speed "Screwball" will ordinarily be driven.  Add to these features the well-known carrying ability and stability of the pram an dyou have a highly useful and adaptable service and utility craft.

8 pages, 3 plate(s)

7.12€
Sea Mate--A Rugged Sea-worthy Skiff (Pub. No. 5185)

by William D. Jackson, Naval Architect

The design for this rugged seaworthy boat was taken from proven sea skiffs used by fishermen for generations. It has been brought up to date so that the backyard boat builder can use newer materials and still retain the durability and seaworthiness of original designs. "Sea Mate" was built with a plywood bottom and lapped plank sides; however, plywood may be used for the sides or board and batten construction may be used for the sides and bottom. This wide choice of building materials will enable you to make a faithful reproduction of this little boat with the materials at hand regardless of what part of the world you live in. It is powered with a Trollabout inboard marine engine. This small air-cooled engine utilizes the same efficient method of propulsion as ocean liners—namely, a 2 to 1 reduction gear that permits the engine to turn at higher efficient speeds while propeller speed is reduced by one-half. Integral gear box has lever controlled setting for forward, neutral and reverse.

16 pages, 3 plate(s)

8.01€
Sassy--A Rough Water Runabout (Pub. No. 5198)

by Charles M. Ungerbuehler, Yacht Designer

LOA 21' 2", BEAM 7' 21/2", WEIGHT 3275 LBS.

Some runabout owners want their boats to be as fast as possible; others desire their craft to be comfortable in rough going. For this latter class, "Sassy" has been created. Her construction is on the fairly heavy side and her lines have been worked out to produce an easy-running boat. The drawings show a V-8 Mercury marine conversion. Any good marine engine weighing not over 650 lbs. and developing not over 100 hp. could be used.

8 pages, 4 plate(s)

7.12€
Ishkoodah--An Express Cruiser (Pub. No. 5199)

by Gerald Taylor White

LOA 25' 0", DRAUGHT 24", BEAM 8' 13/4",WEIGHT 5275 LBS.

Here is a high-speed cruiser with hull and superstructure of the ultramodern type. She has the sleek, racy, sparkling style of a runabout plus good cruising accommodations for two. Her streamlined cabin, which adds to rather than detracts from her beauty, contains two extra-wide berths, a watercloset under a seat, a big wardrobe, other lockers for general gear, and a galley that is better than those often found on boats of much greater length. Obviously there isn’t full headroom in the cabin (if the cabin top were raised high enough for headroom, her beauty and speed would be ruined), but you’ll live in her immense cockpit most of the time you’re awake anyway, so who needs headroom? She has a V-bottom hull of the sawed-frame type and thus is as easy to build as it is possible to make a boat. Her afterbody is of the parallel-buttock or inonohedron type; so the water flowing beneath the hull cannot close in and form speed-cutting eddies, but instead is thrown clear without any major change in the flow lines. Power her with an engine ranging from 80 hp. upwards. Almost any of the popular automobile conversions would be ideal. One of these hulls equipped with a hopped-up Ford V-8 turned in a speed of just under 25 m.p.h. Another with an ordinary 100-hp. V-8 turning at only 2,000 r.p.m. did 15 m.p.h. These are not “catalog” figures dreamed up by armchair copywriters, but are actual speeds made in time trials conducted in accordance with the standards of the Society of Small Craft Designers.

13 pages, 5 plate(s)

8.01€
Barracuda (Pub. No. 5200)

by Luther H. Tarbox, Naval Architect

LOA 25' 6", DRAUGHT 36", BEAM 8' 101/2",WEIGHT 7130 LBS.

"Barracuda" was designed to be constructed by the amateur. Anyone possessing a passable knowledge of boats and a fair proficiency with woodworking tools should have little difficulty in building her. She can be used as a sport fisherman, a grand vacation cruiser for two, or a day cruiser for a larger party. Her lines were designed to plane at 16 mph. The bottom sections forward are sharp enough to reduce pounding to a minimum in rough water. Aft, she has a constant deadrise angle, which reduces suction at planing speeds to a minimum and induces a comfortable inboard bank on turns. Her long, straight keel gives good protection to hull, propeller, and rudder and makes her an easy craft to haul out. The shaft has been splayed slightly to port to counteract the propeller’s water-wheel effect, thus insuring that she’ll run a straight course. The fuel tanks and water tank are located so variations in tank contents have practically no effect on the boat’s trim. She was designed for a speed range of 20 to 30 mph when powered with engines of from 95 to 150 hp. The engine weight should not exceed 1,300 lbs. With the engine shown (a Graymarine Six-244 Express), driving a three-blade 16x14-in. propeller through a Graymarine VeeDrive having a 1.36: 1 reduction, she will do 20 to 23 mph. A vee-drive must be used for only the arrangement of engine and shafting shown will give the required longitudinal balance. The arrangement, both on deck and below, is practical. In the large, comfortable self-draining cockpit, the helmsman has good visibility all around. Even at planing speed, he can, see the water over the bow about one boat length forward of the stem.

16 pages, 5 plate(s)

8.01€
Serene--A Tabloid Houseboat (Pub. No. 5201)

by Luther H. Tarbox, Naval Architect

LOA 27' 31/2", BEAM 10' 01/4", DRAUGHT 2' 9", WEIGHT 8532 LBS.

For vacationing afloat or for leisurely cruising, this tabloid power houseboat should appeal to many. Most folks would rate her as a slowpoke with her 9 to 12-mph speed range, but her spacious accommodations provide comfort that the faster boats of her length cannot begin to give. Examine her cabin arrangement and see what a world of room there is below. Just forward of the cockpit is a huge galley. Then comes the deckhouse with convertible berths to sleep four. In the forward cabin are lavatory facilities and storage space galore. The engine compartment, below the deckhouse floor, contains the engine, fuel tanks, a 110-volt lighting plant, and the starting batteries. Each fuel tank has a capacity of 65 gallons. Under the after cockpit, there are a 70-gal. water tank and a 14-gal. fuel-oil tank for the galley range. "Serene" has an outboard rudder with an airfoil section, flat on the starboard side and cambered on the port side. This camber is proportioned for a right-hand propeller and cancels out its tendency to shove the stern to starboard. If the engine you install turns a lefthand wheel, the cambered side of the rudder must be to starboard. Specified power is a Lathrop LH-4 gasoline engine with 2:1 reduction gear, developing 38 hp. at 1,100 shaft rpm. This will drive "Serene" at 10 mph and consume less than four gallons of fuel per hour. Almost any medium-duty marine engine or properly converted automobile engine that develops between 40 and 75 hp. at 1,200 to 2,000 rpm could be substituted.

8 pages, 7 plate(s)

8.01€
Simple Simon (Pub. No. 5203)

With a 3-hp. air-cooled inboard engine, this attractive 15-foot plywood utility boat will do 10 mph.

LOA 15' 71/4", BEAM 4' 51/4", DRAUGHT 13".

Designed to be seaworthy,"Simple Simon" is almost perfect for fishing and general use wherever the water kicks up a bit. While an outboard motorboat has many obviously attractive characteristics, it is far from its best in rough seas or choppy waters. You see, its stern must be broad to carry the combined weight of the motor and the operator without squatting. And its transom must be kept low--or must be cut down at the center-—so the propeller will operate in solid water. In a following sea, sooner or later a wave will come aboard, drowning the motor and perhaps even swamping the boat. An inboard boat such as "Simple Simon" can operate in a following sea without danger because its transom is higher and narrower than that of an outboard-powered boat and its engine, being located well forward of the stern, is protected. "Simple Simon" seats six in comfort. There’s room under the forward deck for quite a bit of gear. Thanks to her simplified V-bottom construction, her first cost will be low and she’ll be almost as easy to build as a flat-bottom boat. There is no difficult bending to be done. She can be powered with any small aircooled engine. With a 3/4-hp. unit, she’ll do 6 mph; with 11/2-hp., she’ll do 8 mph; and with 3 hp., she’ll do 10 mph. It isn’t advisable to put in much more than 4 hp. as she isn’t designed for speed. The air-cooled engines have three distinct advantages. First, they are simple to install. Second, they have no cooling systems to corrode or rust away. And third, they are economical to operate-—"Simple Simon" will go 64 miles on a gallon of gasoline when run at 6 mph with a 3/4-hp. engine.

12 pages, 4 plate(s)

7.12€
Barbara-Q--A 15-Ft. Utility Outboard (Pub. No. 5212)

by Edward F. Waldron

This V bottom boat is designed primarily as a utility type for knockabout work, fishing, camping and carrying a good load. It will handle six persons in comfort and safety. The motor may be anything from 11/2 horsepower, 19 pounds weight to 18 or 25 horsepower, and the larger motors will give the boat a good turn of speed. For general use, however, the seven-horse motor is good sinc eht eboat will then do from 12 to 14 honest miles per hour.

16 pages, 4 plate(s)

8.01€
Slim--A 14-Ft. Outboard Motor Skiff (Pub. No. 5215)

by Robert E. Waldron

Perhaps the most useful of all boats is the skiff. A good skiff makes an excellent all-round craft for service and pleasure. Furthermore, a very fine skiff may be easily built. For enjoyment, a skiff should be reasonably fast with a small motor. Slim is a light and very snappy boat that handles well with a small outboard, and rows nicely, too.

8 pages, 4 plate(s)

7.12€
Scram III--A 15-Ft. 9" Plywood Speedboat (Pub. No. 5218)

We won't attempt to start this article off by telling you how good a design "Scram" is; the boat has spoken for herself. The advent of waterproof plywood has made the double planked bottom and the seam battened sides no longer necessary. This material can take an ungodly beating so it doesn’t need to be as thick as solid wood—thereby saving on hull weight.

8 pages, 3 plate(s)

7.12€
Building Riptide--A 13-Ft. Outboard Fishing Skiff (Pub. No. 5226)

A 131/2 x 5-foot fishing skiff for outboards.

by Robert J. Whittier

There are many spots along the seacoast where rivers, creeks, and small bays afford good moorings for fishing skiffs. Just outside, the ocean teems with fish. The narrow inlets to the protected waters, however, often develop nasty chops due to the struggle between tide, ground swell, and wind. Even on fair days, it may be a problem to get through such turbulent areas. "Riptide" was designed to cope with such conditions. She’s a practical, roomy boat with a bow that’s 24 in. high. The outboard motor is mounted in a well at the stern. This allows the installation of an outer transom that’s far higher than is ordinarily possible so there’s no danger of swamping in a following sea. Unlike a good many dories and semi-dories one is apt to find on salt water, she is a very steady boat to fish from.

12 pages, 3 plate(s)

7.12€
Merry Maid--A 15-Ft. Plywood Runabout (Pub. No. 5227)

Plywood 15-ft. runabout.

by Charles M. Ungerbuehier, Yacht Designer

"Merry Maid" was designed for the man who desires a roomy little runabout capable of good speed and having rough-water ability. With her graceful, sweeping sheer, she is a saucy little packet. She has completely pleased her original owner and may interest those of you who desire an inexpensive, easily built boat. Powered with a Mercury Super Ten and carrying two passengers, the prototype ran from Seaford, Del., to Nanticoke, Md., and return, a distance of approximately 80 miles, in 4 hours and 15 minutes without ever having had the motor wide open. Under way, "Merry Maid" runs cleanly at either high or low speed, banks beautifully, and has sufficient stability, despite her light weight, to allow a couple of passengers to sit on the side decking without fear of being tossed overboard. The boat is large enough so that passengers sit down in it rather than on it.

8 pages, 2 plate(s)

7.12€
Imp--A 14-Ft. Utility Inboard (Pub. No. 5228)

by Gerald Taylor White

"Imp" has all the earmarks of a good boat. If she were twice her length, the same hull form would still produce a good boat for all-around use. There’s enough deadrise to avoid pounding in any ordinary sea and enough draft to hang on instead of sliding crabwise every time she gets smacked by a beam or quartering sea. To keep her crew dry, "Imp" has more than the usual amount of freeboard. Her nicely flaring sides forward round into a pleasing tumblehome aft, quite like her larger sisters who swing proudly at anchor off the swanky yacht clubs. Of course, "Imp" is not a cruiser—or is she? The canvas weather cloth forward certainly covers ample space to stow all sorts of camping gear and if the after seat is made removable, there’ll be room enough to spread a couple of inflatable mattresses. A second canvas, buttoned to the forward spray shield and over the sheer molding, will provide as snug a bit of cabin as lots of people would want. Powered by a 5-hp aircooled motor, "Imp" will run just about all day on a buck’s worth of gasoline and oil. The small propeller will keep the draft shallow enough so that you can sneak up picturesque waterways where the bigger boats wouldn’t dare to venture. If you do get snared on a sandbank, simply jump overboard and shove ‘er off.

12 pages, 3 plate(s)

7.12€
Fontana (Pub. No. 5230)

by S. S. Rabl, Naval Architect

We who live on the sea coasts have been in the habit of thinking that all worthwhile boating is done in arms of the sea. In the past few years, however, thanks to the several Federally sponsored hydroelectrification projects, many inland manmade lakes, connected with thousands of miles of cruising water, have appeared. In the Tennessee Valley, where one of the projects is located, a new generation of boatmen has come into being. I have passed through this region several times and have seen enough of its advantages to want to spend the rest of my life in its quietude. It is possible to take a small boat in there by trailer and it was to this end that "Fontana" was designed and named in honor of one of the beautiful lakes of the region. Many hotels and motor courts are set close to the water, so it is not necessary to spend one’s vacation cramped in a small cuddy cabin. "Fontana" is therefore an open boat with a sedan top. If caught far from tourists’ quarters, she can be converted to an overnighter by rigging her canvas curtains. For berths, lay two inflated beach mattresses on the flooring. For cooking, use a Coleman stove.

12 pages, 6 plate(s)

8.01€
Whoosh--A Fast Runabout (Pub. No. 5231)

by Charles M. Ungerbuehler, Yacht Designer

If you’ve ever harbored the desire (and who hasn’t?) to own a trim, racy runabout, one that is fairly easy to build and will give years of reliable service and pleasure, then you’ll want to get started on "Whoosh". Performance-wise, this snappy little speedster is everything that her name implies, and is ideally suited for general river and lake use. While "Whoosh" is not primarly intended for rough, deep-water operation, her sea-going qualities have not been sacrificed in the interest of greater speed. The design incorporates a modern constant-section afterbody, which has proved its superiority on countless other craft, and a generous degree of deadrise to keep riding comfort at a maximum consistent with this type. With these design considerations, "Whoosh" will never have to take a back seat to any stock-built runabout of comparable size when the going gets choppy. The arrangement is planned for the utmost in comfort, convenience, and stability. Reached through a hatch, the shelf under the forward deck provides stowage space for anchor, line, and other light gear. A little farther astern is the driver’s seat, which holds two comfortably and has locker space below.

16 pages, 3 plate(s)

8.01€
Caballero (Pub. No. 5232)

by Charles M. Ungerbuehler, Naval Architect

"Caballero" was designed for the amateur builder who desires a roomy, fast, and comfortable cruiser without the attendant high building and upkeep costs usually associated with inboard craft. She is a direct developmertt of an earlier design that has proved successful in the hands of a large number of builders. The cabin provides comfortable quarters for two. Besides the berths, it contains a galley stove, food locker, icebox, watercloset, and adequate storage space. There is not, of course, standing headroom. There is, however, ample sitting headroom. That is all you can expect in a boat of this size; so don’t be persuaded by some misguided amateur adviser to increase the headroom in hope of making a better boat of her. You have the word of the designer that you will not. "Caballero’s" rough-water ability will be excellent. The hull shows a pronounced flare forward and the maximum allowable deadrise consistent with her speed requirements. Her afterbody is of the constantsection type, which will insure comfortable banking on the turns and a smooth, disturbance-free, level ride.

12 pages, 3 plate(s)

7.12€
Sea Glider (Pub. No. 5236)

by Joseph Adams

"Sea Glider" is basically a scow or, if you prefer, a pram. She’s truly an allpurpose boat. For those who like speed, she’ll skim along the top of the water beautifully with a stock 10-hp motor; for those who~want to troll for fish, she’ll idle down and ride nicely on an even keel. Her V-bottom meets a bow that is narrower than the rest of the boat, giving a nice spoon shape. This not only eliminates the jarring slap common to a scow when bucking heavy seas but makes her buoyant and much drier than any sharp-bowed boat of comparative size

8 pages, 1 plate(s)

7.12€
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