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Crab--A 22-Ft. Shallow Draft Hydro-Jet Cruiser (Pub. No. 5378)

Designed by William J. Deed

There are many areas of beautiful waters for boating where “the bottom is very close to the top,” where mud and sand banks, weeds and grass, small twigs and branches of trees are too numerous to permit the usual propeller-driven craft to operate. The propeller in such waters is quickly rendered useless by winding itself in grass and weeds no matter how well protected and installed in a tunnel. In such waters Hydrojet propulsion is the answer, since it has no propeller, strut, shaft, rudder or other fittings below.     In the flat bottom of the boat there is a screen admitting water to the pump which discharges the water into a jet nozzle protruding only 3½ inches below the bottom of the boat. This pump discharges about 1100 gallons of water into the jet nozzle, which turns all around 360 degrees. When pointing aft the boat is driven forward and when pointed forward the boat is driven astern. When the jet faces toward port or starboard it drives the stern in the opposite direction. So there is no rudder required, but a lever and control combine to operate the jet and the water supply to it. This takes the place of steering wheel and gear, the engine having no reverse gear, operating in one direction all the time. We are speaking of the Hanley-Kermath Hydrojet unit which has pioneered this field with its Model 60 unit consisting of a modified 61 h.p. Kermath Sea Jeep engine and the pump and jet units. These are shown in the plans of Crab herewith. It is easy to see why we have named her Crab, since, like a crab, she can operate in any direction in shallow water. If she gets stuck in the mud or sand you can simply reverse the nozzle and throw the jet of water against the bank of mud or sand and wash or jet the boat free. The extreme draft of the boat including the jet is but 101/2 inches. She is no express cruiser; if you expect to travel fast don’t build her but if you expect a 10-mile boat in which you can cruise in a foot of water where there is a bit of puddle-jumping to do then Crab is your boat.

8 pages, 4 plate(s)

$7.95
Fisherman--A 9-Ft. Featherweight Utility (Pub. No. 5379)

Fisherman is designed primarily for easy transportation by automobile. It does not need a special trailer but can be simply carried on the top or back of a car or on a house trailer. It is the ideal fishing boat for use on those hard-to-reach lakes, which today yield the biggest catches. Although it can be rowed easily it is particularly adapted for use with small outboards up to 6 h.p., and so is also suitable for use as a small utility runabout, tender or playboat. In designing Fisherman, it has been borne in mind that many who have had no previous boat building experience naturally make their first boat a small one. All the way through, then, construction has been made just as simple as possible, while an unusual number of details are given in the article, to help the man who will build in Fisherman his first boat. Large enough to hold three adults, it can be built to weigh as little as seventy-five pounds, complete, by using light cedar planking and cedar and spruce framework. The principal measurements are: length over all, 91/2 feet, beam, 42 inches, and depth, 13 inches.  It may be built with three seats and a short deck or can be decked over to frame No. 3, omitting the front seat. The weight would be about the same either way. The batten-seam construction used not only decreases the weight greatly but prevents leaking no matter how long the boat may be dried out.

6 pages, 3 plate(s)

$7.95
Apple Sauce--A Fast Little Speedster (Pub. No. 5380)

by F.T. Irgens

A clever design and building instructions for an inexpensive little outboard boat which anyone can build

Speed and continually more speed is the demand of the outboard motor enthusiast these days. Designers have been producing new types and styles of little boats intended particularly for outboard motor propulsion in large numbers. The design presented herewith represents the result of much experimental work, and is a most succssful little boat for its purpose. When equipped with any of the modern 4 h. p. outboard engines, it will easily do 20 m.p.h., and is also able and seaworthy considering its type and size. The idea underlying the preparation of this design is to permit the outboard motor enthusiasts to construct an inexpensive and speedy craft. With this thought in mind, the designer has arranged his materials so as to eliminate difficult carpenter work, and permit the boat to be constructed with simple and ordinary tools. The addition of the dummy keel gives the boat the appearance of a Vee bottom craft, and also gives it exceptional maneuvering ability. This keel has not the disadvantages of the flimsier metal fin. By carrying the Vee bottom all the way to the transom, all of the bottom sections of the ribs are identical, and the boat will bank nicely when rounding a turn.

5 pages, 4 plate(s)

$7.95
Flyer--A 10-Ft. Midget Runabout (Pub. No. 5381)

by Willard S. Crandall. Design by Bruce N. Crandall.

The Flyer Midget runabout is a unique design that shouid fill a long standing need. It is only ten feet long; and the bottom design and weight balance of this little boat is such that it will actually plane with outboard motors so small they are hardly ever considered in relation to speed. The many small motors in the five-to-ten horsepower range can be used successfully on this boat. Because of the hydroplane design a very maximum of speed is obtained from these motors, often much more than their owners thought them capable of. A sixteen horsepower motor is the largest size recommended. Like all Flyer designs, simplicity of construction is stressed. The stem, for example, is the simple racing boat style. The total weight runs about one hundred and twenty-five pounds. The roadster cockpit is built to accommodate two persons. Here is a chance to get some revs out of a fishing motor. The ease of construction, low building cost and speed possibilities of the boat make it a wonderful addition to the family of any boatman who has a small outboard motor.

9 pages, 3 plate(s)

$7.95
Flash--A Fast Outboard (Pub. No. 5382)

Designed by C. A. Nedwidek

A speedy little hydroplane adapted to class B and C engines simply designed and easy to build.

Small outboard engined hydroplanes are in great demand among the coming generation of yachtsmen. Speed is what they want and they will be content with nothing but the fastest boats. Our design is for a smart little hydroplane adapted to Class B and C engines. It is not suited to the larger engines and would require the addition of squatboards on the hull aft to provide increased planing area. The construction has been kept as simple as possible so that no difficulties should be encountered in the work. A great deal of pleasure and recreation will be derived from the work of building this little job.

4 pages, 2 plate(s)

$6.95
Plyabout--A Sturdy, 13-Ft. Light Utility Boat (Pub. No. 5383)

by Bruce N. Crandall

Plyabout has been designed to meet exactingly the requirements of the average fisherman. Its wide range of usefulness extends from small-creek to deep-sea fishing, while in calm water it will carry as many as six persons. This 13-foot modern utility boat can be built to weigh anywhere from 125 to 175 pounds. Outboard motors from 1 to 10 h.p. may be used for speeds of from 5 to 20 m.p.h. Two men can launch it easily almost anywhere; it can be carried about on a small trailer or even on top of a car. The lines are such that even 3/8-inch plywood may be easily bent into position, while the bottom design provides for efficiency with a small motor and for easy rowing. Heavier materials than specified must not be used, as the boat would then be harder to row. Intended for the hardest kind of usage, Plyabout is of exceptionally sturdy construction. Plywood is, of course, a material both tough and strong, but it is susceptible to damage from contact with submerged stumps or rocks, or from continuous rubbing on any sharp object. The construction of Plyabout has therefore been arranged so that either half of the bottom may be very easily and quickly removed and replaced with a new piece of plywood, only a few hours’ labor being involved. The framework is so strong that this may be done without the slightest possibility of the boat changing shape in any way.

12 pages, 3 plate(s)

$7.95
Black Arrow--A 13-Ft. Outboard Racing Runabout (Pub. No. 5384)

by Bruce N. Crandall

Because of the constantly increasing popularity of outboard runabout racing and the adaptability of waterproof marine plywood to this type of hull, many requests have been received for a new racing runabout which ccculd be easily built with this material. This new boat is a development from the Flyer Racing Runabout which set many runabout class records since the first appearance of its design. Except for the narrowing of the running surface by the addition of the lap in the bottom the underbody of this new boat is essentially the same as that of the Flyer Racing Runabout. The boat may be built with or without the lap, as desired. So as to simplify planking with waterproof plywood, the sides, bevelled chines, and forward part of the bottom have been redesigned. The use of this plywood planking results in increased strength, easier construction, and a smoother bottom, and also allows the boat to be built without difficulty as light as 200 pounds for class C racing. The principal measurements are as follows: length over all, 13 feet 2 inches; water line beam, 491/4 inches, and height of sides amidships, 141/2 inches.

8 pages, 2 plate(s)

$7.95
Flyer Racing Runabout--An Outboard Design (Pub. No. 5385)

by Willard Crandall. Design by Bruce N. Crandall

Recent summer seasons saw outboard runabout racing, which has long been popular on the Pacific Coast, gain a foothold over the entire country. The Flyer Racing Runabout has been designed for the stiffest competition, numerous experiments and long experience with West Coast runabout racing contributing toward the finished design. While simplicity of construction is stressed in this design, speed is in no way sacrificed. This racing runabout is the result of years’ experience in designing, racing and actual manufacture of racing boats on the Pacific Coast. It turns sharply, handles well in rough water and has plenty of speed. Bevelled chines make the craft non-tripping, yet the beam is sufficient to keep it riding high at full speed. The overall length is 13 feet and 1/2 inch, and the beam 48 inches. The boat can be raced in the four runabout classes—class F, class E for service motors, and class C for racing motors and for service motors.

8 pages, 2 plate(s)

$7.95
Flyer Utility Runabout--A 13-Ft. Outboard, The (Pub. No. 5386)

by Willard Crandall. Design by Bruce N. Crandall

The Flyer Utility Runabout is designed as an all purpose outboard runabout—for family use, fishing—its’ use is unlimited. New features of construction give strength with lightness—thereby creating a boat excellent for all-around use and still a Flyer. It is no longer necessary to have a heavy, slow boat for a utility boat. The Flyer Utility Runabout is strong enough and safe enough for all kinds of use; still it has speed that approaches that of a racing runabout. Bevelled chines the whole length of the boat, with a double bevel toward the transom, make the boat extremely difficult to upset. The bottom is so designed that the boat will not pound excessively in rough water. The V toward the bow will break up the waves when the boat is not planing—the boat performs perfectly with a motor of less than twelve horsepower, the only loss in using the small motors being that of speed. The factors that have given this boat the unusual combination of safety, strength and speed have not made it a boat difficult to construct. There are very few curves to be laid out: only the two last frames on each side and four deck frames. The decking and seating arrangement is very simple. The strong, yet light construction which give the boat the combination of speed, ease of handling and durability is a feature of the design. The boat is light enough so it will plane with a smaller motor than will the average outboard runabout. The main dimensions are: overall length 13 feet 1/2 inch; overall beam 4 feet 2 inches; and beam of the planing surface 3 feet 2 inches.

8 pages, 2 plate(s)

$7.95
Toto--An Outboard Motored Runabout (Pub. No. 5387)

Designed by Chester A. Nedwidek

A complete design and building instructions for a substantial little boat of an increasingly popular type which can be easily built

An easily built runabout of a type which is becoming more popular every day, is shown in the present design. Intended particularly for use with any of the larger sizes of outboard engines, it will make an ideal boat for use around a camp, or for general utility service wherever a handy boat is necessary. While Toto is not of the real high speed type of outboard motor boat, such as is generally used for racing alone, it will still be sufficiently lively to suit most people. As can be seen from the drawings, it has been arranged with two separate cockpits or wells, the forward one of which serves as a passenger cockpit, being equipped with seats to accommodate four persons, two on each seat, while the after cockpit is reserved for the use of the operator or helmsman, where he will be alone and undisturbed, so that his entire attention can be centered on the operation of the boat.

4 pages, 3 plate(s)

$6.95
Whiz--A 16-Ft. Outboard Speedster (Pub. No. 5388)

A design for an exceptionally fast boat designed to be driven by six to ten horse power outboard engines

For the particular benefit of the speed bug, who must have speed under any consideration, this design for a fast little boat, has been prepared by the engineering department of the Johnson Motor Company. Intended to be propelled by one of the new and exceptionally powerful six horse power, outboard engines, such as that used experimentally last summer by the Johnson Outboard Motor Company, this boat will produce startling results in the way of speed. Similar boats to this were successful in winning many of the competitions, and speeds of 16 m.p.h. were every day events. This little boat follows in general the hydroplane type of design and construction, and in building it, care should be exercised to keep all excess weight down to a minimum point. This boat is sailing under its own colors, as a fast craft particularly adapted to racing. it is not intended to be a family row boat, to take all hands, the children and the dogs out for a day’s outing, as it is too narrow to be a suitable boat for these conditions. When used with one of the big engines, and loaded with not more than two passengers, the results will surprise you.

4 pages, 2 plate(s)

$6.95
Baby Buzz--An Outboard Runabout (Pub. No. 5389)

Designed by L. J. Johnson

A design for a fast little boat suitable for family service and purposes other than racing.

Many devotees to the sport of outboard motoring enjoy the speed which is possible with these little boats but still are not anxious to secure the maximum racing speed from their engines. They prefer to have a little more comfort in their boats and for these a design such as the sixteen foot Baby Buzz runabout described below will prove interesting. A boat of this kind is somewhat more substantial than the extreme light racing hulls and is intended to carry several persons in comfort and speed. When built by the amateur builder, care should be exercised to shape all parts carefully and accurately according to the drawings.

7 pages, 4 plate(s)

$7.95
Utility--An 18-Ft. Work Boat (Pub. No. 5390)

by Captain W. Mack Angas (CEC) U.S.N.

When several small boats were needed for the Public Works Division of the Charleston Navy Yard, it was considered worth while to try and fine or develop something better than the traditional bateau. We therefore decied to adopt the basic idea of a punt type outboard driven utility boat and design a boat of the size needed. The result was Utility, as handy and useful an eighteen foot work boat as could be desired for the multiudinous odd jobs that fall to the lot of the survey party and waterfront gang at a shipyard. To facilitate beaching, to give working room in the forward end of the cockpit, and to promote stability when heavily loaded forward the boat was given an unusually wide forward transom or stem, but she nevertheless has easy lines and should not be confused with the shapeless boxes that only too often masquerade as punts. Though not built or intended for speed, Utility slips over the water with surprisingly little fuss and has proved considerably faster, when driven by a 5 horse power service motor ahdna 16 foot flat bottom row boat driven by a similar motor.

5 pages, 1 plate(s)

$6.95
Sure Mike--A New Idea in Cruisers (Pub. No. 5391)

Designed by E. Weston Farmer, N. A.

The design and specifications for a rough water hydroplane for big outboards which carries a shelter cabin and which can cruise in any water safe for any boat of her inches.

Sure Mike is a he-man’s boat. If it’s bang-and-go-back runabouting you want, something which at low speeds can take the knocks of rough water—a boat that’ll carry quite a load and still be about 10 miles an hour faster than present big outboarders of her size, Sure Mike will not disappoint you. Or if it’s cruising you want—say, let me tell you!—that’s really the thing Sure Mike is designed to do, and do well: to carry a large outboard, utilize its power efficiently and to be able to carry at least two people with abbreviated equipment on a cruise of short duration. There’s a sunken cockpit forward and a big cockpit aft—ample for all rough and tumble runabouting. Her cabin resolves itself into nothing more than sheltered sleeping space, yet it is roomy and comfortable for two. It might have been more, but low freeboard is tantamount to good performance with outboards, largely because of windage although weights too must be kept low for stability when turning. Hence you see no boxcar topsides or other cabin effects in this design. She is fitting and in keeping with the sea. There is no galley. There is no plumbing, nor does there need to be, for her function is to do what a canoe does, only to do it more adequately: carry the duffle and furnish reasonable shelter. She will go anywhere a little boat could possibly go, and she will do that in one sweet heck of a hurry. That’s Sure Mike, and by Joe, that’s enough for any boat!

20 pages, 3 plate(s)

$8.95
Dragon-Fly--An Easily Built 181/2-Ft. Cruiser (Pub. No. 5392)

By C. A. Nedwidek

Reliability and power of the new outboard engines adapts them readily to driving larger and abler craft. Complete plans and specifications for a smart little cruiser.

There are presented here the plans and specifications of a small outboard boat, designed so that it is easily adaptable for use as a cruiser. Many outboard cruisers have been designed, but none such as this one. All in all, she is a flat bottom hull with a slight V forward, equipped with seats as shown on the plans, to give a seating capacity for six for day use. The backs of these seats are so arranged that they drop down forming two full length berths on each side of the boat, giving sleeping accommodations for four. A light standing top is shown on the outboard plan; this is to be fitted with side curtains that button along the coaming, closing in the entire hull and giving absolute privacy for the cruising party. Aft on the starboard side the toilet compartment is shown, a light wood partition being built up to a height of thirty inches above the floor line. Directly in this compartment a regular marine toilet fixture is to be installed. The wash basin is fitted on the short leg of the L part of the partition. Putting it in this position will serve the dual purpose of a wash basin and a galley sink, the basin is to be fitted with a small basin puthp that is to be connected to the water tank forward. A curtain or curtains are to be fitted to close in this compartment up to the top of the awning. Opposite the toilet room the galley or cooking portion of this miniature cruiser is to be located and to consist of a built-in ice chest with the top of it acting as a stove platform. The stove itself is optional but the type most practical to use on this boat is one of the folding spirit stoves. They fold up pretty compactly and when not in use, can be stowed under one of the seats. The tanks are to be located forward, one twelve inches in diameter and thirty inches long with a capacity of fourteen gallons, to be used as a fresh water tank, and the other twelve inches in diameter and twenty inches long with a capacity of eight gallons, to be used as the gasoline tank. Both tanks to be filled from deck, with the fill pipes located on deck as shown. The side curtains are to be fitted with windows and screens as shown. The upper rectangles, shown dotted on the outboard plnn, with one of them cross hatched, are intended for screens, while the lower ones are windows, either of celluloid, or just flaps that can be hooked up. Windows are also to be fitted in the forward and after curtains, three windows in each.

8 pages, 4 plate(s)

$7.95
Doodlebug--A 12-Ft. Inboard Monoplane (Pub. No. 5402)

by John L. Hacker

The current interest in motor boat racing, more particularly in boats of small size, has led to the design of a brand new little boat. Abler and more sturdy than like outboard types, it will provide great sport and competition among the growing generation of youngsters. The idea for this little Doodlebug was conceived during the recent Motor Boat Show in New York. John Hacker, the designer, was much taken with the possibilities of marine plywood as a boat building material. The tests and demonstrations of its use were very impressive. Later during the show he found a small motor which was being introduced by the Arnolt Motor Company under the name Sea-Mite. The combination of a little boat built of plywood and powered with one of these engines was immediately apparent. Mr. Hacker accordingly set about the preparation of a design and the construction of a boat. This first boat was later exhibited at the Chicago Show, where it met with universal approval and favor.

4 pages, 3 plate(s)

$6.95
Slippery--A 135-Class Hydroplane (Pub. No. 5403)

by John L. Hacker

The racing of small hydroplanes is becoming one of the major sports of the boating world. Many excellent and skillful drivers who have acquired their experience in the hard way of the outboard, are turning to the inboard as a means of satisfying their craving for speed and excitement. Small inboard hydroplanes, while not so extremely fast, are still capable of relatively high speeds and offer equally good competition, particularly in the standard racing classes such as the 91, 135, and 225 cubic inch types. The little design presented herewith is intended for the 135 cubic inch class. Other designs published previously take care of the smaller and larger classes as well, so that this design rounds out the series. The design of Slippery is based on numerous successful small hydroplanes in these several classes. While the design is conservative the boat will give a good account of itself in competition, and at the same time serve as a smart sporty runabout when desired for such use. It is a small boat, 14 feet 31/2 inches in length, with a maximum beam of 4 feet 91/2 inches. There are several racing engines suitable to the class now on the market so that no difficulty will be experienced in securing a satisfactory engine.

12 pages, 3 plate(s)

$7.95
How to Build Moppet--A 19-Ft. V-Bottom Cruiser (Pub. No. 5404)

by Foster, N.A., J.L.

A handsome little cruiser with accommodations that are very complete for the size.

12 pages, 4 plate(s)

$7.95
Jane, A Hand 18-footer (Pub. No. 5409)

by Wm. H. Hand, Jr.

Our plans this month are for a fast little runabout of 18 feet in length. When equipped with the Specified 20 h. p. Kermath motor this outfit should be able to do 17 to i8 m.p.h. without any difficulty at all. The design of this little boat is in a general way similar to the one published last month. When it comes to power plant, however, we see that the design is entirely different. The engine is more nearly amidship and the cockpit aft is entirely clear. This location of the power plant shifts the weights further forward and compensates for the weight of passengers in the cockpit. When under way the tendency to lift out forward or plane is counteracted to the proper degree by the selected motor. That explains to some measure why the naval architect is so particular in the selection of the power plant. Having designed a boat and figured on its speed and angle of planing and a lot of other things, he does not like to see his calculations entirely upset by some smart novice who decides to put in a bigger engine and get more speed. The inevitable result of this is to bring the boat down by the head, interfere with the lifting out forward at speed, and the creation of a tremendous fuss at the stern, while, strange as it may seem, the speed does not improve at all. The valuable lesson to be learned from this is that the naval architect has very good and sufficient reasons for everything that he dopes in the design of a boat. The weights are calculated, and the engine is located at a particular point. The seats are located with a reason, and any attempts to improve on the design on the part of the novice are certain to result in failure as far as satisfactory performance of the boat is concerned. Mr. Hand has had ample experience and skill in turning out fleets of small boats, and his designs should be followed without changes.

12 pages, 2 plate(s)

$7.95
Flyer--A 91-Cubic Inch Racer (Pub. No. 5410)

by Willard Crandall. Designed by Bruce N. Crandall

A new design inboard hydroplane

Ninety-one and a half cubic inches—the smallest of the inboard hydroplane racing classes. The very size of the class guarantees its eventual popularity. Smaller racing classes have steadily gained in favor as improvements in engine and hull design have consistently raised the speeds in each class. The 91 cubic inch class, for which this new Flyer was designed, has several unique rules which will, aid in popularizing racing in it to a marked extent. A price limit is placed on the motor; $450, retail, is the highest price that can be affixed. Superchargers are barred. The waterline length of the hull must not be less than twelve feet; the chine beam at the widest section must be at least four feet. A total minimum weight for the hull and motor is prescribed—600 pounds. While it has been borne in mind that many persons will wish to build the 91 cubic inch Flyer not exclusively for racing, no element of speed or handling qualities has in any way been sacrificed. Yet features of this craft will make it an excellent speedy runabout for use in more sheltered waters. Such features consist partly in the double seat and provision for use of starter, following racing rule requirements. The design as shown also provides for reverse gear and hatches over the motor. These are not called for by the racing rules but the builder who wishes to leave them off should be careful that in doing so he does not lower the total weight of the outfit below 600 pounds. Total weight will, of course, vary with the motor used.

12 pages, 3 plate(s)

$7.95
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