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Speedo--A Novel Outboard Boat (Pub. No. 5413)

Designed by Harold Tapken, N.A.

A sixteen foot outboard engined runabout with the engine mounted amidships.

What do you think, of putting the motor in the thiddle of the boat and the driver further back toward the stern, so that the boat might trim on an even keel when at rest? The engine, of course an outboard motor of the usual form, must be placed in a well, so that it can be removed at need, if anything happens to the propeller or a shear pin breaks. Now this well would have to be rather large, say 11/2 feet in length and about one foot wide. The water would rush into it, as soon as the boat started, and the faster the boat went, the more the water would shoot into the well, causing great resistance. So one would have to fit a lid to the bottom of the well in order to make it watertight and prevent the water from rushing in. This now presents some great difficulties, for the underwater parts of an outboard motor are rather awkwardly shaped and the lid would have to fit perfectly tight, while on the other hand it should be easily removable. The more we thought about the details, the more complicated everything seemed to get, so that we soon began to look about for another way of fitting the motor, or at least another form of well, if one could not do without this. Well, what about fitting a step? Even if the motor were not very powerful, its power would just be sufficient to push the boat along at planing speed, so that a step would not add to the resistance in any way. As the water tears off at the step a good part of the boat's bottom is clear of water as soon as a certains peed is attained. If, now, the well is placed at this point, no water could possible run into it, as soon as the boat is under way. The top half of the motor was turned around so that the carbureter pointed backwards towards the driver, who only had to stretch out his hand to make any necessary adjustment. It was a great idea to lead the exhaust gases through a flexible pipe into the step, where they could expand readily, as there would not only be no back pressure to overcome, but where they would be drawn away by the vacuum, which occurs just behind the step. In order to give the exhaust a free passage, the muffler was removed, with the hope that enough silence would be obtained by the gases expanding under the bottom of the boat, metal fins being fitted to prevent the sound from taking the shortest way out. In this way we hoped to get rid of the back pressure, as well as the noise, and the arrangement proved to be a success in every way. Instead of the clumsy motor hanging at the transom, it was neatly tucked away and visible only from behind. The boat therefore had the appearance of a real motor boat with inboard engine, but had the advantage, that the motor took up hardly any space inside the hull, the entire bow portion of the boat being left for useful purposes, even being spacious enough to permit an afternoon’s nap.     A second virtue of the boat is that it always trims well, at rest, at slow speed, and high. This fact makes the boat easy to handle and very seaworthy.

16 pages, 5 plate(s)

$8.95
Hoocares--A Tabloid Houseboat (Pub. No. 5414)

by E. Weston Farmer, N. A.

Plans and specifications for a miniature floating home which is driven by an outboard motor and which can cruise safely where the water is spread thin.

Some people seem to think that a small boat on the tabloid order, to be worth anything, must be the kind of hooker into which one can throw a dozen muffins at a moment’s notice, and with a beautiful slant of wind sail down to Cape Horn for afternoon tea. Along with numerous others, this humble writer has long differed with that contention. I am a firm believer in boats for a purpose. I believe that the most satisfactory boat to own is the kind of boat which actually fits the water in which she is nominally at home when roosting time comes and the hook slops overside into its usual resting place. Sailing tabloids have their mighty interesting points. In fact I am working right now on a salty little deep water lady and would be the last soul on earth to condemn them. But too much emphasis cannot be laid on the fact that a tabloid design, appealing to a man’s sense of economy coupled with the itch to own a boat, may often lead him to building a boat he has no particular need for, as after all, the great majority of boating done in these anxious days confines itself to day boating an hour or two from moorings. Ergo, we have Hoocares, patterned for sheltered waters and ditch crawling after the manner of the Holland hoogarts. She was designed for the man who knows that the bulk of his adventures will confine themselves to sleeping aboard a bit, to readings and mug-ups of a chilly Saturday afternoon, and to making use of her comfortable mobility in avoiding monotony of anchorages. Her name Americana of course, for hoogarts, which is Dutch for, well, it’s in the dictionary—and because of the adaptability of the general idea of the hoogarts to the uses this needed tabloid might be put to, I have swiped the general idea and made our little hooker something of a Dutchman—beamy, housed across her midriff, blunt of snoot and thin on the underfoot side. Lets have a look at her from the cruising standpoint. About the first novelty you’ll notice is the fact that you don’t have to grease your hide to get in and out of her accommodations. They’re actual instead of alleged. And paradoxical as it may seem, there’s absolutely full headroom, I don’t care how tall you are. The only place there is room enough for two man-sized feet is right under her ample hatch, although there is good footroom all along the face of the bunk, from the pail which acts as a sink, to starboard, past the Shipmate near the companionway over to the hinged lid which nonchalantly burns a Murad over what’s under. Hoocares in her culinary and sewage departments is as neatly arranged as I believe is conceivable.

16 pages, 3 plate(s)

$8.95
Flyer--A 135 Cu. In. Class Hydroplane (Pub. No. 5415)

by Willard Crandall

Designed by Bruce N. Crandall

Absolute maximum speed, is the cry of many race drivers. For a race, they want a boat that will go fast--sufficiently fast to win; and if it will, other features of it do not matter. The 135-Class Flyer is designed to give maximum speed, but maximum speed under normal competitive conditions. Factors of design giving straight-away speed, turning ability, and ability to ride rough water have been so proportioned that in an actual race a high peak of speed is reached. As can be seen from the profile drawing, a perfect stream-ling has been achieved. The 135-Class Flyer has been designed on the principle of carrying most of the weight on the foreplane, so that a wide afterplane is not necessary. While length and beam are somewhat over the minimum prescribed, because of its shape it is, really, a small boat. Construction is much more simple than it might appear offhand. The pointed stern is built similar to an upside down bow. The transom is used the same as ever, and serves as an additional bulkhead. No rabbeting, except in the stem, is required. The type of construction called for is about as light as is practical considering the strength necessary and it is not advisable to build the boat lighter.

9 pages, 3 plate(s)

$7.95
Zephyr--A 135-Cubic Inch Hydroplane 16-Ft. Overall (Pub. No. 5416)

by A.A. Apel

Motor boat racing is always popular and these plans are made with the man in mind who is enthused with racing and prefers to build his own boat. Although the building of a high-speed racing hull is of a particular nature and fairly complicated, it is the endeavor of the designer to simplify the instructions and plans as much as possible. As will be noted in the design, the boat has an over-all length of 16 feet with a beam of just about 5 feet. To make it easier for the amateur to build, the construction has been simplified without sacrificing strength where it is necessary.

8 pages, 2 plate(s)

$7.95
Katherine, A Hand 30-foot Cruiser (Pub. No. 5417)

Designed by Wm. H. Hand, Jr.

Continuing the presentation of plans of famous Hand V-bottom boats, we publish this month a complete set of plans and specifications for a 30-foot cruiser, Katherine, which is as complete and able a boat as it is possible to find on the seven seas. The enthusiasm which greeted the appearance of the two Hand V-bottom runabouts will be redoubled with the publication of the plans of this 30-foot cruiser. This boat is a sizable, well-constructed and thoroughly able little sea boat. Fast enough to get anywhere and back again before the trip becomes monotonous, and comfortable enough to enable a small, congenial party to undertake a lengthy cruise far from the beaten paths, its cruising range being ample for several days’ cruising before the item of fuel becomes troublesome. The construction of this boat is of course more difficult than the runabouts published before. Undoubtedly a professional builder would make the most satisfactory job of this boat. Whether it is advisable for the unskilled amateur to undertake its construction is a serious question. While 30 feet is only twice 15 feet, the amount of work involved is nearer ten times as great. There is decking and flooring and ceiling and plumbing and finishing and many other items to be done and the amateur to tackle a job of this kind should be quite certain that he is possessed of the requisite skill and ability to see it thçough. As our arrangement plan shows, this boat is provided with a lavatory in the bow, next are some very, useful full length lockers to hang clothes and oilskins. Everyone will admit that lockers of this type are just the kind they have been wishing for. A ventilating hatch in the deck above the cabin is a further useful addition for comfort. Two transom berths in the cabin provide comfortable sleeping accommodations for two people, and if necessary swinging backs could he installed to provide berths for two more. The galley is large and commodious, the platform for the stove is over the refrigerator and all heated air can readily flow out through the companionway hatch. The cabin can be kept cool and comfortahle and odors due to cooking are readily disposed of. The port side provides place for the sink, and pantry with dish racks, etc., close by. In the large cockpit ample space is provided for easy wicker chairs which can be left behind if the party is to be a small one.

12 pages, 6 plate(s)

$8.95
How to Build Consort II (Pub. No. 5418)

The accompanying illustrations are those of a small cruiser that was designed primarily with the idea of being easily constructed, in order that the average amateur who has some practical knowledge of the use of carpenter’s tools could build a boat. No doubt many will criticise same; the stern should be different, the stem should have more rake, etc., but the èxpIanation given above should be a sufficient excuse for the general shape of the boat not meeting the requirements of all. If the instructions for building this boat are followed carefully, the builder will be surprised to find out how much he has learned about building by the time he has completed this craft. Then later on the knowledge he has gained will be of material assistance when he again considers the building of a larger boat. Some of you will smile at this and no doubt think that a boat of this size would be as large as you would ever need, but I have been there, and know how natural it is for one to realize quite often that the boat which he thought so large and commodius is just a trifle too small.

38 pages, 3 plate(s)

$9.95
Gull--A 16-Foot Runabout (Pub. No. 5420)

by Chester A. Nedwidek

An attractive design for a small vee bottom runabout or yacht tender which has been simplified to permit of construction by amateur builders.

The design for Gull which is presented here, is that of a small Vee bottom runabout, which will serve equally well as a yacht tender for a boat which requires a tender as large as this. The shape of the hull has been kept as simple as possible, in order to make it easier for the amateur builder to undertake and complete.

12 pages, 3 plate(s)

$7.95
Skeeter--A Fishing Skiff (Pub. No. 5421)

by C. A. Nedwidek

Design, specifications and building, instructions for a most useful shallow draft tunnel stern utility boat of an economical type.

This little boat was designed for the use of those who like to prowl up little creeks and bays where the water is spread out, those places where a deep draft boat cannot get by. She also will be useful for duck shooting to tow the duck boats and equipment to the shooting blind. Many localities are blessed with an abundance of water but it is spread out so thin that the ordinary type of motor boat is useless. For these conditions the only satisfactory type of craft is a shallow draft and tunnel stern job. The little boat designed here will suit such conditions exactly and will operate in from 9 to 10 inches of water. An economical little engine and a simple form of construction will make the entire job very inexpensive. For many places and conditions this will be an ideal craft and will answer fully every requirement for a useful little pleasure craft.Being of a very simple design no difficulty should be encountered in the building of her. She is absolutely flat bottom with slightly flaring sides. The tunnel construction is of the usual box type, easy to build; in the design of this tunnel the sides have been carried down to form a skeg, this will give a sled effect in that two of these skegs will drag over the bottom should a real shoal spot be encountered, and still give protection to the wheel and rudder. As designed, these extend down nine and one-half inches below the water line giving the boat this draft. The interior arrangement is just that of an open boat, with a short deck forward, two athwartship seats, engine with a box over it and a short after deck, outboard rudder with the tiller carried through the transom and connected to a side steering wheel with the tiller lines.

8 pages, 3 plate(s)

$7.95
Sandpiper--A 22-Foot Shoal Draft Runabout (Pub. No. 5424)

An attractive design and specifications for a shallow water craft of excellent appearance and a fine turn of speed

Designed by Chester A. Nedwidek

Sandpiper is a double cockpit runabout of the V bottom type, designed with a tunnel stern, this being done to cut down the draft so that she can be used in places where the water is plentiful but spread out over a large area. The extreme draft to the bottom of the wheel is only about eighteen inches. If a heavier engine using a larger wheel is installed the draft will be increased slightly. The engine shown on the drawings is a 35-50 horsepower Kermath weighing about 700 pounds, which should drive Sandpiper at a rate of about 22 to 25 miles per hour. Sandpiper will carry about six people very nicely although her seating accommodations allow for more. She is handled entirely from the forward cockpit, here the helmsman will sit at his steering wheel, with the reverse lever and all other necessary items for the control of the boat near him. This double cockpit arrangement makes this boat ideal for a yacht tender as then the crew is kept separate from the guests or the owner as the case may be. With the decks painted green, which by the way is much easier on the eyes in the sun than if painted the usual buff color, mahogany transom, mahogany covering boards in the way of the after cockpit, mahogany top strake and the rest of the topsides painted white, with a green boot top, you should have avery handsome job.

10 pages, 5 plate(s)

$7.95
Shark--A Deep Water Runabout (Pub. No. 5425)

A substantial design and building description for a heavy duty runabout able to go out to sea with ease

Designed by Chester A. Nedwidek

This runabout which was designed for real service such as fishing in open waters.  From her lines it will be seen than she has plenty of displacement and is not just sitting on top of the water as the usual speed type of runabouts are. Straight V sections to simplify the building as much as possible and plenty of freeboard to make her a good seaboat. The plans of Shark show a boat that is twenty-three feet over-all, twenty-two feet one and three-quarters inches water line, six feet six inches beam and two feet draft. The lower sheer line is a straight line running from a height at the stem of twenty-seven inches above the designed load water line to a height of twenty-one inches at the transom, the upper sheer is comprised of two straight lines, with a break at station 10, the upper plank between these sheer lines if made of mahogany and finished bright will give a very snappy appearance to the entire job, the sheer moulding should also be of mahogany.

8 pages, 3 plate(s)

$7.95
Compact--An Outboard Cruiser (Pub. No. 5426)

A smart little boat designed for economical driving with the popular outboards for a power plant

Designed by C. A. Nedwidek

Compact in name and compact in reality, is this little raised deck cruiser, the plans of which are shown herewith. Twenty-five feet in overall length and every inch of these twenty-five feet is used for some practical purpose. Designed with the idea in view to give the utmost in a boat for a small outlay, she has also been kept to a simple type of construction for the amateur to build himself. In the forward cockpit we have something novel but not new, this makes an ideal place to sit and sun oneself, the forward cockpit idea has worked out real well on larger boats and there should be no reason that it will not work as well on a small boat. Access to the cockpit is gained by going over the raised deck, but if a hatch is desired one can be easily fitted, in fitting a hatch one can make the back of the seat in the forward cockpit to hinge down, then one can get to the cockpit from the interior of the boat. For the arrangement of the boat we have the cabin with two transom seats which are to be made so that they extend to give a good width for use as berths, the extension idea was used so that when the seats were not being used as berths more floor space will be available and a table can be used in the cabin. On the port side is the toilet room, to be equipped with a small corner wash basin and a toilet. The basin is to be equipped with a pump and piped up to the fresh water tank. Opposite the lavatory on the starboard side is a space laid out for a galley, dish lockers, dresser with ice chest under, sink fitted in dresser top, sink also to be fitted with a pump for fresh water, an d a space for a single burner kerosene or alcohol stove, of a type that is generally used for camping. If this is not desired a Sterno stove might do for the purpose.

12 pages, 3 plate(s)

$7.95
Sturdy--A Utility Boat (Pub. No. 5427)

Designs and specifications for a most useful type of small boat intended for many kinds of useful service

Designed by C.A. Nedwidek

This is a small round bilge boat primarily intended to be used as a general service boat. She also would make an ideal club tender, for with the small cuddy house shown aft, she would afford shelter for passengers in inclement weather. She has not been designed with speed or fancy finish in mind, just a plain little real boat. Her general layout and arrangement consists of a short forward deck under which is a general stowage locker, for anchors, chains, ropes, lights, etc. Next we have a large open cockpit with full length seats on each side. The steering wheel is located at the forward end as shown. All engine controls shou1d be brought to the wheel, to make her easily handled. Two gasoline tanks, rectangular in shape and of a size as shown on the plans are to be installed under the seats one on each side as shown. Aft of this cockpit we have a small cuddy house, which houses the engine and is also fitted with two seats, one on each side. Then there is a good after deck. Two Sampson posts are shown, one fitted forward and one aft. These can be used for towing purposes.

9 pages, 2 plate(s)

$7.95
Ethel--A 27-Foot Trunk Cabin Cruiser (Pub. No. 5428)

by Chester A. Nedwidek

The design for the cruiser "Ethel" is approaching the class of work which will require a pretty experienced amateur builder with a good shop. It is not recommended that amateur builders without previous experience at boat building attempt to build this cruiser, for they will find its construction more difficult than their experience and facilities will allow. A job like this is really more than a one-man job, so that if you decide to build the boat yourself, make certain that you have plenty of willing help, otherwise you may find that you are still working on the boat next summer.

12 pages, 4 plate(s)

$7.95
Shallow Draft Cruiser, Turtle, The (Pub. No. 5429)

Designed by Chester A. Nedwidek

Attractive design for a little boat designed particularly for amateur boat builders and arranged to accommodate several persons

Turtle, a smart little Cruiser, designed for service in very shallow water, will make an ideal boat for exploring creeks and shallow rivers. As designed she can accommodate two people on the berths in the cabin, as the hull is sheathed in the back of the berths no uppers are provided for; if wanted these can easily be installed, giving her sleeping accommodations for four instead of two. The forward cockpit is an ideal place to sit and enjoy the scenery while cruising up some winding creek, when one never knows what view will greet the eye next. In regard to the design of the hull this has been kept as simple as possible, vee bottom, the sides have been given a little shape that is a flare forward and tumblehome aft to take away some of the boxy look that a straight section boat would have.

10 pages, 2 plate(s)

$7.95
Janet--A Double-Cabin Cruiser (Pub. No. 5430)

Designed by C. A. Nedwidek

Small cruising craft of popular type, completely designed and described, ready to begin construction

Several years ago I was commissioned to design a thirty-six-foot double cabin cruiser with a center cockpit. This design proved very popular and the owner of this particular boat was very well pleased with the layout; it proved very comfortable and convenient. Knowing this and feeling that a boat designed along her ideas might prove popular, I proceeded to design the boat shown here. Six feet were cut off of the length, but still leaving a boat that should prove roomy enough for the average man and still small enough for him to handle and keep up. One other item was changed, the original design was of the round bilge type while this is of the V bottom.

12 pages, 5 plate(s)

$8.95
Magnet, A Hand 28-foot Cruiser (Pub. No. 5431)

Designed by Wm. H. Hand, Jr.

All aboard! Now that vacation time is here and, rapidly becoming, a memory, it is well for those of us who had to sit on the club porch and watch the other fellow have the good times to consider plans for a boat of our own. This series of plans from the drawing-boards of Wm. H. Hand, Jr., are designed with the particular object in view of encouraging those of us who wish to own a boat to undertake its construction from well-studied and properly executed designs. The proper design of a boat is more than half of its future success. Stand on the banks of any river in the country and watch the procession of boats as they pass. How many of these were sponsored by a competent designer. One can tell without a second glance all those that were just built by hit-and-miss methods. Notice the difference when a properly designed and kept boat appears. Everything is in its proper place, and where it was intended to go by its designer. The engine is located so that the boat trims properly. She is not down by the head, neither does the bow aim at the sky; rather, the trim is properly proportioned so that the boat is correct in all particulars. The arrangement of the boat is in general similar to other small boats of this type. A pair of transom berths forward, with the customary galley and ice-box amidships, followed by the motor under a raised cockpit floor just aft of the cabin bulkhead. The cockpit is roomy and of ample size. The seats have been purposely omitted in order that more comfortable wicker chairs or furniture of a like nature might be used here. For the amateur builder this should be an easy boat to construct.

For the man with moderate means who desires a smart up-to-date cruiser that will give a good account of itself in rough or smooth water, this design should make a favorable impression. There is ample cockpit room for day trips and comfortable cabin accommodations for a small party while cruising. The power plant designated, though small, should drive this little cruiser better than 13 m.p.h. Simplicity is the keynote of this design as noted by the absence of doors,small useless cupboards, etc., that usually hamper the elbow room in a boat of this size.--WM. H. HAND. JR.

13 pages, 5 plate(s)

$8.95
Broad Bill--A Sword Fisherman (Pub. No. 5432)

Designed by C. A. Nedwidek

Complete plans and specifications for the construction of a typical and popular craft among new england fishermen.

Broadbill has been designed for the Yachtsman who has had a taste of that sport of sports, Swordfishing, and who now wants to try his skill with his own boat. In size and type she is typical of the boats fishing out of Block Island. The layout is slightly different in that the motor has not been put in the cabin but occupies the space generally used for hold space. The cabin is small but ample, having two hinged pipe berths, Shipmate stove, sink, ice box, and toilet. Also, a clothes locker at the forward end with the rope locker in the bow. A small pilot house over the companionway with steering wheel, and compass shelf, provides protection for the helmsman in bad weather. The fish well is aft of the motor with a flush hatch on deck. The 100 horsepower motor will give Broadbill a little more speed than the average boat of her size and type and the 220 gallons of gas will give her ample cruising radius. The construction has been kept simple and the amateur should not find any great difficulty in building her.

10 pages, 4 plate(s)

$7.95
Comfort--A Scow Houseboat (Pub. No. 5433)

by C. A. Nedwidek

Design and building instructions for a popular type craft adapted to summer service and arranged to accommodate the entire family with a few guests   

Comfort, according to some may not be what they would call a boat, in one sense of the word she is not, bu~ she is a comfortable floating home, one, that if one should by any chance get tired of the scenery or locality can be moved to another. The actual construction of this scow houseboat is simple. No line to be laid down and faired up, as would be necessary on any other type of boat. Just straight away simple work, all square joints. With the possible exception of the hull itself the rest of the work is about the same as would be encountered in building a small frame house. If this job is tackled by the amateur boatbuildei the biggest problem he wifl be up against is to find a place~to build. This should be as near the water as possible for when completed it will be a very heavy and cumbersome craft to handle, particularly out of water.

6 pages, 3 plate(s)

$7.95
Shark, A Hand 21-foot Utility Runabout (Pub. No. 5434)

Designed by Wm. H. Hand, Jr.

The last runabout in the series of Hand plans is presented herewith. Only twenty-one feet long but combining in a small space all of the conveniences and utility of a larger boat. The arrangement is well planned and provides a pair of individual seats forward at the steering position. Additional seats in the after end of the cockpit will accommodate five or six more people and adapt the boat to ferry service and other utilitarian purposes. The motive power is one of the simple little 9 to 12 h.p. Universal motors. It is capable of driving this boat at a sufficiently rapid rate to comply with all reasonable requirements for speed. This boat is within the range of construction by the amateur builder.

One desiring a smart little runabout suitable for use around the summer home, lake or camp, should find this design interesting. The described motor, though small, will drive the boat at a good clip, and be very economical with the present high cost of gasoline. The divided forward seats and auto steerer provide a convenience not usually found in a runabout of this type, and the cockpit provides ample room for ferrying to and from camp, fishing, or any use a small boat might be put to.--WM. H. HAND, JR.

11 pages, 3 plate(s)

$7.95
How to Build a 20-Foot Monoplane (Pub. No. 5435)

The regular hydroplane, although possessing great speed, is nevertheless a very disagreeable proposition to ride in, and it is doubtful whether, below certain lengths, the step is of any importance. In the design of the little boat described herein, use has been made of the bydroplane principles by combining the hollow V-bow with the concave stern section. In this way a boat of maximum speed is obtained with freedom from pounding. Two arrangements are shown: one open, with seating capacity for six or eight persons; the other, a regular auto runabout arrangement.

7 pages, 6 plate(s)

$7.95
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