Small Craft Plans

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Auto-Top Size Fisherman's Boat (Pub. No. 5863)

by Bruce N. Crandall

LOA 111/2 FT., BEAM 4 ft. 9 in., DRAFT 6 1/2 in., DISPLACEMENT 575 lbs.

An easy-to-build 111/2-foot, medium-high-speed, soft-riding utility, it's specially designed for low-horsepower outboards and features simple, light construction.

This is a general-utility, auto-topsize outboard boat designed for use with the modern economical 5and 6-hp fisherman’s motors. It is a developable-surface, sheet-plywood model, particularly easy for an amateur to build. The construction is simple and light, with relatively few frames, as the boat is soft-riding and not intended for use at high planing speeds, at which it could be subjected to hard pounding. It is light enough to be carried about on an auto-top carrier. An easy-planing and efficient bottom design is necessary to get the most economical operation from small 5- and 6-hp motors. Their gas economy may be quite poor on a hull which they cannot make plane, but they are capable of 30 miles per gallon or even more on a planing hull of the proper size. The type of bottom design used here is efficient and soft-riding at low planing speeds, though less efficient—uses more fuel for the speed, in other words—than many others at higher planing speeds. Compared to other bottom types, it is also quite efficient at semiplaning speeds, which helps make planing easier with small motors. It’s the large planing area and uniform angle of attack that make planing easier and increase efficiency at iow planing speeds. Absence of suction drag at the chines also increases efficiency at semiplaning and low planing speeds. The seating arrangement is designed for most efficient weight distribution at semi-planing and planing speeds up to 18 mph. With 5- and 6— hp motors, good fore-and-aft weight distribution can be attained with only one aboard, sitting in the stern seat steering by the motor handle, provided the fuel tank and all other weights are placed as far forward as possible. About the same weight distribution will result with the driver in the forward seat, steering by a wheel, and all other weights placed far aft. With two people aboard and the same 5- or 6-hp motor, the boat will be in semi-planing condition and therefore will stand more weight forward; thus two can sit in the forward seat with the rest of the weight aft, or one forward and one aft with all other weights far forward. With motors of less than 5 hp, the boat will always be in semi-planing condition, and it will be difficult to get the correct fore-and-aft balance with only one person aboard except by driving from the forward seat with either a steering wheel or an extension handle. With motors of about 8 hp, the boat will plane with two people aboard, and a steering wheel becomes necessary for safe operation. This is an ideal small fishing boat for most protected waterways, not only because of its exceptional efficiency with 5- and 6-hp motors, but also because it is very seaworthy and safe for its size. The freeboard is higher and the beam much greater than that of the average auto-topsize boat, making for much better stability. This same extra width, especially at the transom, makes for very poor efficiency at speeds below 10 mph, when the hull is in pure displacement condition—-for transom drag is considerable at these speeds. For this reason the hull will not be suitable for rowing any great distance, although it will handle quite well with oars while still-fishing. A hull for best efficiency at rowing speed or with a 1- or 2-hp motor should be very long and narrow, with almost no transom. This same inefficiency at slow speeds, however, especially the transom drag, makes the boat ideal for trolling with a 5- or 6-hp motor, as the transom drag acts much like a trolling plate or large bucket dragged behind and enables the driver to easily secure any trolling speed desired.

8 pages, 5 plate(s)

£6.19
Quicksilver (Pub. No. 5878)

by Weston Farmer

LOA 11 ft 5 in., beam 50.5 in.

Although she is easy to build, she will do a lot of things most prams won’t do. Designed to give low-cost thrills, she can handle a 10hp kicker.....;f you’ve got the stuff to go right along with her. With a little power, she’ll be 5 to 10 miles an hour, faster than most prams. She’ll build for lust about $50*

This cute little boat will be very easy to build because she is simply a shaped box. The transoms, frames and topsides are all straight work and only the forward bottom, or foreplane will require some sweat and savvy. Though she is simple she has a design basis that is as involved as an airplane, and I’m here to tell the world she’ll do a lot of things most prams won’t. She is designed to give low-cost thrills with an average service type 5 hp mill. She can handle a 71/2 hp job and with it will plane two people. For those who like their thrlils hairbreadth, she can handle a 10 hp kicker, but you’d better be young and agile and have nerve! Quicksilver will build for about $50 to $55, or a shade more, depending upon location. For this sum you’ll get a boat that will stow atop your car, which all small prams will do. With little power, she’ll be 5 to 10 miles an hour faster than most prams. Because of the step, she’ll balance with two people just like a plain fishing boat (most prams won’t do this) and if you want to install oarlocks and use oars, she’ll make a splendid fisherman’s rig. The drag of step under oars will not be noticeable. At anchor, because of high-steeved chine forward and buoyancy in the forward portion of the hull, she’ll ride drier than most prams. Because of their form, step hydroplanes have certain advantages of loading and trim when used in nonplaning or displacement condition. I have drawn the water lines on the outboard profile showing various load conditions. By placing a blank sheet of paper from line to mating line, you’ll see that her trim under various load conditions doesn’t change much.

* Those are 1955 dollars!--DNG

8 pages, 4 plate(s)

£6.19
Chippewar--A Plywood Canoe (Pub. No. 5883)

by Weston Farmer

LOA 15 ft., Beam about 34 in., weight about 63 lbs in 5/16 in ply and about 76 lbs. in 14 in. ply.

Here is the first design ever published for a plywood canoe that has all of the real canoe size and shape.

In these plans you are looking at the first design ever published for a plywood canoe that has real canoe shape and size. Her name is Ckippewa, and she is carefully engineered to a fine grain for those canoe lovers who have the skill to do a nice bit of wood cutting. For some reason, canoe builders are rabid purists—heat, close work does not stump them, and they’ll agonize over every little fastening and refinement. Eighty per cent of all boat design lies in the art of sizing. This is most true of a canoe, because, like a fly rod, or a gun butt, or a golf club, the thing is almost worn, and slight differences in measurements become very noticeable. Chippewa, you’ll find, is sized just right. I’ve taken great pains to make her so. Although her construction will not trouble anyone who is competent with hand tools, I am presuming that she will not be your first boat and that you’ll understand the rudiments of laying down, fairing and, in general, setting up the moulds on which to build her.

8 pages, 5 plate(s)

£6.19
12 foot Rowboat, A (Pub. No. 7800)

The hull is built bottom side up on a "building board", the top edge of which is shaped to conform to the keelson curveture dimensioned in the sheet plan.

2 page(s)

£2.72
Susan (Pub. No. 7802)

by Robert M. Steward

This easily propelled 11-ft. flat-bottom rowboat requires little boat building know-how to construct.

2 page(s)

£2.72
Pootzy (Pub. No. 7803)

by Al Mason

This 6-ft. 6-in. dinghy fills the need for a small, substantial, easily stored and handled boat.

This dinghy is only six feet six inches long by thirty-eight inches wide and will be built quite light for ease of handling when stowing on deck. Complete with all equipment except oars, Pootzy should not weigh much more than fifty-five pounds, which is about double that of a one-man rubber life raft which carries two people. This little dinghy can carry two and it is to be noted that the oarsman seat is in the shape of a tee, so that with two locations for oarlocks his position can be varied to suit, depending on one or two in the dinghy.

4 page(s)

£2.72
Combination Rowing, Sailing and Outboard Boat (Pub. No. 7804)

Designed by F.W. Goeller

Here is a handsome, heavy duty service boat that, properly built, will give years of service, and is well adapted to rowing, sailing or outboard use. She will take the largest outboards one would care to handle over her stern and she is designed not to squat at the stern. She will carry a big load and is not light. She is a heavy boat, built with all the trimmings that used to be seen in the old-time heavy yacht gigs.

3 page(s)

£2.72
Whaleboat (Lines Only) (Pub. No. 7805)

Lines taken off by William H. Hand, Jr.

The New Bedford Whaleboat, in her time launched on all the oceans of the world, probably shows the maximum development reached in building small boats that were to be propelled by oars or sails. The men who manned them were interested in two things besides the first condition of seaworthiness: speed and silence. Lightness of construction was a prime factor in these craft. They were maneuvered entirely by manpower, lowered in the falls and hoisted again without the aid of such modern gear as power winches and the quick response needed during an attack could not be had in a heavy boat. The 28-footer shown in the accompanying lines weighed not much over 1,000 pounds.

1 page(s)

£2.72
Glouchester Fisherman's Dory (Pub. No. 7806)

The most universally used small boat for ocean work is without doubt the fisherman’s dory. At the same time, probably not one of these boats is built from plans, in the ordinary sense. They are built by men who were brought up in the business, who learned from experience—and the men who taught them as beginners—how to do the job. The true dory, as developed by the fishermen of the New England Coast, is ideally suited for her work, but she was developed in the boat yard by trial and error, not on the drafting board of a naval architect. Consequently it is not possible to give a complete set of lines for construction purposes—they don’t exist. The lines shown herewith were taken off a dory on a fishing schooner lying in South Brooklyn, where many of the New England boats put in. The scantling dimensions were taken from a dory at Fulton Market, New York.

2 page(s)

£2.72
N.J. Seabright Skiff (Lines Only) (Pub. No. 7807)

Lines of Clinker-built Craft 18 ft. to 30 ft. overall

For landings on the open seacoast, such as the beaches of New Jersey or the southern shore of Long Island, the type known as the Seabright or New Jersey skiff was developed several years ago. The design was taken over by fishermen, and as is the case with many boats built for local use and with suitability for hard service as the main consideration, no real design was ever made. The lines shown here are not construction plans and cannot be used as such unless more work is put on them. They do, however, show the general contours of an especially seaworthy type that proved its usefulness under the hard conditions for which the boats were built. The lines were taken off an actual Seabright skiff by the late naval architect, Roger M. Haddock.

1 page(s)

£2.72
Half-Pint--A small simplified sea sled (Pub. No. 7808)

A little plywood and a lawn-mower engine are all you need to build "Half Pint".

Plywood-preferably the waterproof kind, a small amount of miscellaneous stock and a tiny gasoline motor is all you need to make "Half Pint.” The original, capable of carrying three persons, was quite a sensation at Balboa bay, Calif., where even the old boat builders expressed genuine interest. Built in a garage, it was taken 50 miles for its first dip and has never developed a leak. This little sea sled can be easily carried on your car, and fishermen and tourists will find it ideal for use on remote lakes having no boating facilities. It is only 9 ft. long and so light that two boys can easily carry it. This boat is suitable for the use of any small gasoline engine of the lawon-mower type, air-cooled by a fan in the flywheel. The 1/2-hp. engine which was selected, is exceptionally satisfactory because the gas tank is in the base and as it is a self-contained unit throughout.

3 page(s)

£2.72
Fun at the Beach with a Bicycle Boat (Pub. No. 7809)

Buoyancy and speed are two features of this bicycle boat which was built for vacationists at a lake near Chicago and used a whole season. It consists of two pontoons and an old bicycle frame, held centrally above and between the former. Propulsion is obtained by the use of a ring-and-pinion gear, bolted to the pedal sprocket, and a small three—blade propeller connected to the gears by a suitable shafting.

4 page(s)

£2.72
Feathercraft--A paddling Pontoon (Pub. No. 7810)

Propelled half by swimming and half by paddling, these featherweight pontoons will provide plenty of sport at any beach.

1 page(s)

£2.72
Land Boat, The (Pub. No. 7811)

At the time of the great French war a British frigate that was on blockade duty off the coast near Quieberon, stood too far in to reconnoitre, and being caught by a calm and heavy swell went on a reef and was totally wrecked. The officers and crew escaped to the shore and were made prisoners by the enemy’s coast guard. The French custom was to send all seamen taken as far inland as possible so they might not be retaken or escape to their fleets, and the officers and crew of this frigate were shipped far into the interior of the country. Away from the sea, a captive in an inland town the captain of the frigate cast about for some form of amusement, and struck upon the happy idea of building a landboat, upon which to sail the French highways. The boat was built, and though a heavy and clumsy contrivarice proved a success. Since then in many countries land yachts have been built, but they have been all makeshift craft, of misfit materials and cannot have been either very fast or good handlers. There was one built to sail on a railroad track, which, if the owner didn’t lie, made forty miles an hour. The one whose plan is here given was designed by Mr. Ashley and as will be readily seen is an adaptation of his iceboat to land locomotion.

2 page(s)

£2.72
Wimpy--A paddle Wheel Duck Boat (Pub. No. 7813)

Shoal draft and silent.

This light and stable duck boat is designed for the greatest convenience to the hunter, who propells the craft with the hands and steers with his feet while his gun is instantly at hand in a rack on the gunwhale. As the propelling mechanism is all inboard, it is possible to make a blind of shrubbery around the gunwhale, an achievement not possible with a rowboat or canoe which depend upon oars for movement. With all the bearings carefully fitted to eliminate any play, and the paddle wheel completely housed, the boat will move as silently as a light canoe. Constructed of this material, staunchly braced, it is conveniently hauled on a trailer and very easily launched.

3 page(s)

£2.72
3-Section Rowboat Fits on Your Car (Pub. No. 7821)

When the three sections are taken apart and nested, this 12-ft. rowboat occupies a space only 6½ ft. long, and by virtue of its thin plywood construction is so light that one man can easily stow it on top of his car, using a suitable cradle to hold it. The boat is designed along standard lines, and construction differs only in the use of ¾-in, plywood for sides and bottom. In fact, it is built up as a single-unit rowboat, and then sawed between the two double bulkheads to form the three sections.

3 page(s)

£2.72
Skimmer--A Sturdy Plywood Kayak (Pub. No. 7822)

This kayak is staunch and seaworthy because it’s built of waterproof plywood over a conventional frame. Sides are vertical and only 6 in. high from the bottom edge of the chine to the top edge of the sheer batten, but this gives enough freeboard to keep off moderately rough water.

2 page(s)

£2.72
Foam Boots (Pub. No. 7832)

by Charles Bell

Build these seagoing boots and have fun learning to walk on water.

Swimmers, using these gadgets, can play many games on the water and they are handy for walking around your boat, tending lines and walking ashore, too; of course you have to learn to walk on ‘em. They are easy to build and cost very little. It will take some practice to learn to walk on these foam boots. Start out wearing a bathing suit because you’ll have many falls, but the trick can be mastered!

4 page(s)

£2.72
Aquacycle (Pub. No. 7833)

by Charles Bell

Convert that old bicycle into an amphibious craft for fun on both land and water.

This vehicle can be ridden on the beach and can be run right out on the water and back again. The two pontoons, immersed four inches, will support 480 pounds, so that two boys can have fun at the same time. This is primarily a vehicle for swimmers, but you can ride it wearing clothes although fenders are necessary for this and shorts are recommended because your feet will go into the water when pedaling. Aquacycle is simple to build and requires a minimum of tools; a few wrenches, a screw driver, a hammer, a hack saw and a paint brush will suffice.

4 page(s)

£2.72
No Trailer Needed for This Light Garvey (Pub. No. 7848)

by Hi Sibley

Built in halves, this Barnegat Bay sneaker-type craft is easily hoisted up on the car-top rack, and by virtue of its rectangular design will accommodate more load than the conventional skiff. Construction is much easier too. General over-all dimensions are given, with nose construction and a sectional view showing the beveled rails on the forward half that fit over the stern half and prevent it from slipping sideways.

2 page(s)

£2.72
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